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Does Sprint have contingencies in place for the California exodus?


ImmerStark
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I've been hearing a lot of news lately about the drought in California being past the critical stage and the likelihood of a large chunk of the population being forced to relocate when the ground water is exhausted next year. It occurred to me that this would throw a major wrench in network planning and the allocation of resources. So, any speculation or insight on the how that will be handled?

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Did you read this article on April 1st?  Desalinated water only costs about twice as much as fresh water.  They'll just build more plants if they need more water.  Even if they went to 100% ocean water it would only cost a few hundred dollars more a year per person for residential use. 

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I read in the newspaper yesterday that the average Californian uses 77 gallons of water per person per day...that seems insane!

If they broke that down as total water use and assigned a per person average then that makes sense since California is a big agriculture state. I find it hard to believe that the average individual uses that much water per day.

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Uhhhhhh  :blink:

 

If a large chunk of California's population has to evacuate, you better believe Sprint and the whole country are going to have bigger things to worry about than their cell phones, like where they're going to get a lot of their food and where to put 30 million refugees. That said, it's not going to happen, at least not in the next decade or so, so I wouldn't worry too much about it.

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I read in the newspaper yesterday that the average Californian uses 77 gallons of water per person per day...that seems insane!

The average American uses 80-100 gallons per day according to the USGS. The average shower alone is ~ 20 gallons of water. The average toilet flush is ~2 gallons, an average of five flushes a day per person. Then there's tooth brushing, hand washing, cooking, cleaning. We use WAY more water than we are prepared to admit, as a nation. 

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I'm 66 years old and in my remaining life time I fully expect to see:

 

1)Salton Sea to go back to desert as it was prior to the Colo River flood that 

    created it in the early 1900's; divereted Color River to SS will stop

2)Lake Powell will be fully or mostly drained to stop losses to evaporation and

   to keep Lake Mead from dropping further

3)Colorado River water trickling into the Mexican desert will cease

4) Agriculture in the SoCal regions of Yuma and elsewhere will cease as no

    more Colorado River water will be diverted to that region..it will go back to being

    desert as it once was

5)California agriculture in total will have to cut back water usage by 50% at least

   to prevent further eradication of the acquafers and the devastating consequences

   of their elimination

6)Food prices likely to do a double over the next 10 years for all of us..

 

Gov Brown ordered a 25% cutback of 12-15% of the water use in the state exempting

agriculture which acounts for 80% of state water usage; failure to do the painful math now only

means a lot more pain down the

road for all of us....so yes , I'm worried about being able to use a cell phone going forward since

available funds most likely will be used for food & water

 

Have a good day!!

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I'm 66 years old and in my remaining life time I fully expect to see:

 

1)Salton Sea to go back to desert as it was prior to the Colo River flood that 

    created it in the early 1900's; divereted Color River to SS will stop

2)Lake Powell will be fully or mostly drained to stop losses to evaporation and

   to keep Lake Mead from dropping further

3)Colorado River water trickling into the Mexican desert will cease

4) Agriculture in the SoCal regions of Yuma and elsewhere will cease as no

    more Colorado River water will be diverted to that region..it will go back to being

    desert as it once was

5)California agriculture in total will have to cut back water usage by 50% at least

   to prevent further eradication of the acquafers and the devastating consequences

   of their elimination

6)Food prices likely to do a double over the next 10 years for all of us..

 

Gov Brown ordered a 25% cutback of 12-15% of the water use in the state exempting

agriculture which acounts for 80% of state water usage; failure to do the painful math now only

means a lot more pain down the

road for all of us....so yes , I'm worried about being able to use a cell phone going forward since

available funds most likely will be used for food & water

 

Have a good day!!

 

 

1)Salton Sea to go back to desert as it was prior to the Colo River flood that 
    created it in the early 1900's; divereted Color River to SS will stop
 
The Salton Sea was created from agricultural runoff.  Basically, it was created because farmers used to be horribly inefficient watering their crops.  It's shrinking because farmers no longer waste as much water.  It's 100% man-made...
 
2)Lake Powell will be fully or mostly drained to stop losses to evaporation and
   to keep Lake Mead from dropping further
 
 
 
3)Colorado River water trickling into the Mexican desert will cease
 
There are water compacts that regulate how the Colorado river is shared.  Please review Minute 316 and the colorado river compact:
 
4) Agriculture in the SoCal regions of Yuma and elsewhere will cease as no
    more Colorado River water will be diverted to that region..it will go back to being
    desert as it once was
 
Again, read the Colorado River Compact above.
 
5)California agriculture in total will have to cut back water usage by 50% at least
   to prevent further eradication of the acquafers and the devastating consequences
   of their elimination
 
Well, proper aquifer management laws were finally put into place in California.  They'll be phased in over the next decade or so.
 
6)Food prices likely to do a double over the next 10 years for all of us.
 
Food prices will continue to go up but it won't be primarily driven by California drought.  I would suspect specific crops will double in price as farmers in California pay more for water.
 
Gov Brown ordered a 25% cutback of 12-15% of the water use in the state exempting
agriculture which acounts for 80% of state water usage; failure to do the painful math now only
means a lot more pain down the road for all of us....so yes , I'm worried about being able to use a cell phone going forward since
available funds most likely will be used for food & water
 
Have a good day!!

 

 

I think people tend to read the news and develop very interesting ideas.  Thank you for sharing.

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I've been hearing a lot of news lately about the drought in California being past the critical stage and the likelihood of a large chunk of the population being forced to relocate when the ground water is exhausted next year. It occurred to me that this would throw a major wrench in network planning and the allocation of resources. So, any speculation or insight on the how that will be handled?

 

I suggest you visit the California Department of Water Resources CDEC website.

 

http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/resapp/getResGraphsMain.action

 

Things are bad, particularly for those communities that do live on ground water but for most of California, they are connected to the California State Water Project or the Colorado River.

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I thought the Salton Sea was created by the Colorado River flooding and overflowing its banks. And running to a low spot below sea level and settling. That's what I was taught in California Geography as a kid.

 

It probably is sustained by overflow of agriculture irrigation, though.

 

Using Moto X² on Tapatalk

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I thought the Salton Sea was created by the Colorado River flooding and overflowing its banks. And running to a low spot below sea level and settling. That's what I was taught in California Geography as a kid.

 

It probably is sustained by overflow of agriculture irrigation, though.

 

Using Moto X² on Tapatalk

 

Well, it created a giant hole in the earth that was an empty pocket (kinda like many desert low elevations).

 

The Salton Sea was created between 1905 and 1907 when the Colorado River broke through diversion canals in the irrigation system in Imperial County. 

 

It would have dried up but agricultural runoff kept it fed.

 

www.water.ca.gov/pubs/conservation/salton_sea_history/history.pdf

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Well, it created a giant hole in the earth that was an empty pocket (kinda like many desert low elevations).

 

The Salton Sea was created between 1905 and 1907 when the Colorado River broke through diversion canals in the irrigation system in Imperial County.

 

It would have dried up but agricultural runoff kept it fed.

 

www.water.ca.gov/pubs/conservation/salton_sea_history/history.pdf

Going back in reading the history, it was the flood of the canals from the Colorado River that overwhelmed the dams and dikes and pushed its volume up significantly to be a large sustainable lake. Before that, the lake was much smaller and never expected to be sustained perennially. So both answers are technically correct.

 

Without the historic floods, there would be no large modern Salton Sea. Without the canals and runoff, there would be no large modern Salton Sea.

 

Using Moto X² on Tapatalk

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Not to be pedantic on the Salton Sea..it was just one of my predictions: the Salton Sea was created accidentily

by engineers trying to control the flow of water; they made hydrological mistakes that allowed the Colorado River

to flow there unabated for two years;the compact covenants that irev210 mentioned will be cast aside IMHO to

sustain the most people in the American Southwest over the course of the next decade or so; people tend to fight

over sex, money and power... but they go to WAR over WATER...and old western saying...I'm sorry the die is cast 

on this one...most of what I stated is simply going to happen one way or another..

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Not to be pedantic on the Salton Sea..it was just one of my predictions: the Salton Sea was created accidentily

by engineers trying to control the flow of water; they made hydrological mistakes that allowed the Colorado River

to flow there unabated for two years;the compact covenants that irev210 mentioned will be cast aside IMHO to

sustain the most people in the American Southwest over the course of the next decade or so; people tend to fight

over sex, money and power... but they go to WAR over WATER...and old western saying...I'm sorry the die is cast 

on this one...most of what I stated is simply going to happen one way or another..

 

 

http://poseidonwater.com/our_projects/all_projects/carlsbad_project

 

 

Water will just become more expensive, that's all.  And not catastrophically so.

 

So, right now, in California water can be as much as $1200/acrefoot or so (325,851 gallons), so about a third of a penny per gallon.

 

Desalination costs between $2,000-$2,200/AF.  So even if water costs double to 2/3rds of a cent per gallon, I don't personally view that as a significant burden on income.

 

Let's look at San Francisco - now they have their own water supply that is very drought resilient but let's assume they had no water supply and decided to desal all of their water needs.

 

The average per capita usage of water in San Francisco is among the lowest in the Country at 44 gallons per capita.  Let's assume the average family of four uses 44 gallons each, so 176 gallons a day.  That comes out to $1.144 in usage per day or $34.32/month in water costs.

 

Assume some other overhead costs (O&M, customer service, etc) and we are at about $60-70/month.  As a percentage of median household income in California, that's pretty inexpensive in my opinion.

 

Blend that against $1,000/acrefoot water (say 50% of supply) and you are at even less.

 

Again, bottom line - California isn't running out of water.  It's just becoming more expensive.  It seems likely that people will be less willing to foot the bill for nice grass lawns when that costs hundreds of dollars a month.

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You guys are wrong on the dates.  "The Salton Sea" was created in 2002.  I saw it at a film festival around that time back when I was in film school.

 

220px-Salton_sea_poster.jpg

 

Regardless, this is an odd, sensationalist topic.  The idea that there will be some mass evacuation or exodus of millions of Californians is preposterous.  That will not happen.

 

Rather, if water conditions worsen, there may be a steady trickle -- much like the Colorado River itself -- of people leaving the state, enough to effect negative population change.  It could amount to several million people over several years, probably a decade or more.

 

Moreover, any migration away from California would not be received in just one area.  Many emigrants could go back to Mexico, taking them out of the national equation.  Likely domestic destinations could include Las Vegas, the Valley of the Sun, the Willamette Valley, the Puget Sound area, the Wasatch Front, the Rocky Mountain Front Range, and Albuquerque.  Those long have been popular spots for ex Californians, so that is nothing new.  It is not as if Portland suddenly is going to swell by three million relocations from California.  That "contingency" need not be a concern.

 

In the end, what is the impetus for this thread?  Do Okies have some sort of reverse Dust Bowl fantasy that consumes and empties California?

 

AJ

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Honestly I was just bored and my mind was wandering. The complete lack of meaningful network vision activity in my entire state has left me with much free time to fill ;-)

 

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

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Honestly I was just bored and my mind was wandering. The complete lack of meaningful network vision activity in my entire state has left me with much free time to fill ;-)

 

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

i know how you feel

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The average American uses 80-100 gallons per day according to the USGS. The average shower alone is ~ 20 gallons of water. The average toilet flush is ~2 gallons, an average of five flushes a day per person. Then there's tooth brushing, hand washing, cooking, cleaning. We use WAY more water than we are prepared to admit, as a nation. 

Some research indicates that it is not as clean cut as you make it. The figure of 80=-100 gallons a day is accurate. However, that figure is for domestic water use which includes dish washing, clothes washing and lawn watering. Additionally, the average per person use varies widely depending on where one lives. http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/our_water/tomorrow_beyond.html

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Las vegas is spending billions to build a "straw" to suck out the very last drop of Lake Mead.

That because the State of Nevada won't let them steal it from Nye County and Lincoln County, NV. :P

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 6+ using Tapatalk 3.1.1

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A couple of years ago, Georgia was in a serious drought. Many towns ran out of water and had to get daily deliveries. Same in texas. Las vegas is spending billions to build a "straw" to suck out the very last drop of Lake Mead.

Actually the take of water by Las Vegas is miniscule compared to the water drawn by California (4.4 million acre ft/yr and 

Arizona (2.8 million acre ft/yr; Nevada gets a paltry .3 million acre ft/yr a factor of 15 times less than that taken by Cali....

the current LV "straw" is only 20 ft or so below the surface; the new straw insures that Southern Nevada will get at least

the paltry amount agreed to in 1928..

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That because the State of Nevada won't let them steal it from Nye County and Lincoln County, NV. :P

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 6+ using Tapatalk 3.1.1

 

Perhaps not at the moment because it's not absolutely necessary. However, if push comes to shove, whoever's sitting in the governor's mansion won't let Clark County whither just because Nye, Esmerelda, White Pine and the other rural counties don't want to share.  ;)

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