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World's first fully digital radio transmitter built purely from microprocessor technology


mhammett
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http://www.gizmag.com/digital-radio-transmitter-microprocessor-technology/36380/

 

 

For the first time in history, a prototype radio has been created that is claimed to be completely digital, generating high-frequency radio waves purely through the use of integrated circuits and a set of patented algorithms without using conventional analog radio circuits in any way whatsoever. This breakthrough technology promises to vastly improve the wireless communications capabilities of everything from 5G mobile technology to the multitude devices aimed at supporting the Internet of Things (IoT).

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@kfitchard: A new entry into the 5G debate: Kumu's full duplex technology could revolutionize wireless networks https://t.co/B9J7eyV9LE via @gigaom

 

 

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I think we have discussed here before but this is the first time that the vendor has demonstrated a commercially viable system. The multiplier effect won't be as big as the pCell's but it will definitely help the FDD rich carriers. Now it will require new hardware at both the base station and the user terminal so maybe leaving it for 5G is appropriate. pCell does not require new user hardware so it could definitely be used right away at places like stadiums or other places where a lot of people congregate.

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I think we have discussed here before but this is the first time that the vendor has demonstrated a commercially viable system. The multiplier effect won't be as big as the pCell's but it will definitely help the FDD rich carriers. Now it will require new hardware at both the base station and the user terminal so maybe leaving it for 5G is appropriate. pCell does not require new user hardware so it could definitely be used right away at places like stadiums or other places where a lot of people congregate.

This won't be allowed to run in current fdd spectrum because it would interfere with phones that don't have the new full duplex noise cancellation.

 

But Tdd is good to go.

 

 

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This won't be allowed to run in current fdd spectrum because it would interfere with phones that don't have the new full duplex noise cancellation.

 

But Tdd is good to go.

 

 

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If TDD is already used I don't see how that is any different than FDD. You need new hardware in both cases.

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If TDD is already used I don't see how that is any different than FDD. You need new hardware in both cases.

Yes but Tdd is licensed to use same channel for uplink and downlink with some restrictions on duty cycle I think.

 

 

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@kfitchard: A new entry into the 5G debate: Kumu's full duplex technology could revolutionize wireless networks https://t.co/B9J7eyV9LE via @gigaom

 

I like Kevin Fitchard, but gee, I wonder which is his primary wireless provider.

 

(For instance in many U.S. LTE systems, our devices receive data from the tower in a 2100 MHz channel, but they send information back at 1700 MHz).

 

#TechPressBias

 

AJ

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I like Kevin Fitchard, but gee, I wonder which is his primary wireless provider.

 

 

#TechPressBias

 

AJ

Considering three out of four national LTE networks (and many smaller networks) use AWS frequencies in a fairly significant manner for LTE, that really doesn't say much.

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Considering three out of four national LTE networks (and many smaller networks) use AWS frequencies in a fairly significant manner for LTE, that really doesn't say much.

 

Yes, and all four national networks use PCS frequencies in some manner for LTE.  Touché.

 

;)

 

AJ

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Considering three out of four national LTE networks (and many smaller networks) use AWS frequencies in a fairly significant manner for LTE, that really doesn't say much.

 

I get your point.  I get Kevin's point.  Because of the massive FDD offset for AWS, that makes it much easier to explain to the layperson 2100 MHz as the downlink and 1700 MHz as the uplink -- rather than, say, 850 MHz as the downlink and 850 MHz as the uplink.

 

Wait, what, 850 MHz for both?  How does that jive with this article about full duplex as developing technology for both links?

 

No, no, no, it is actually 869-894 MHz for the downlink and 824-849 MHz for the uplink.  In the end, just 2100 MHz and 1700 MHz are clean and neat.

 

But I do think a tech press bias is evident.  From anecdotal experience, most use VZW, AT&T, or T-Mobile.  They do not come across as though they like VZW and AT&T, but many still subscribe for overall coverage reliability.  Those who use T-Mobile as their primary provider seem to take a rooting interest in Magenta.  And that colors their published pieces -- pun intended.  Much of that can be attributed to the replacement of journalism with blogging.

 

AJ

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