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10MHz by 10MHz LTE 1900 band


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The site shows PCS A block. 

 

For Boston, Washington, and Pittsburgh -- completely inaccurate.  And therein lies the problem with that site...

 

AJ

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For Boston, Washington, and Pittsburgh -- completely inaccurate.  And therein lies the problem with that site...

 

AJ

 

How would one fact check that? I have no idea where to start. I'm trying the FCC website, but what I'm looking for (I think) isn't loading.

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How would one fact check that? I have no idea where to start. I'm trying the FCC website, but what I'm looking for (I think) isn't loading.

 

The PCS A/B blocks are licensed on an MTA basis.  MTAs are large -- they are roughly the size of entire states.  That is the problem.  USCC may hold partitioned and/or disaggregated chunks of PCS A block spectrum in the Boston MTA, Washington-Baltimore MTA, and Pittsburgh MTA, but none of that spectrum is in the titular cities proper, just in the outlying areas, possibly hundreds of miles distant.  Again, that automated site does not accurately and precisely account for such partitions and disaggregations.

 

AJ

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The site shows PCS A block. 

The FCC License View data does not provide geographic disaggregation data (the Spectrum Dashboard uses a different data source that is too infrequently updated to be useful), so you must access the ULS by clicking on the hyperlink to US Cellular's license. The ULS page will provide a tab showing what markets they have.

 

In the Pittsburgh MTA, this license indicates USCC (through Hardy Cellular Telephone) has only frequencies in West Virginian parts of the MTA.

 

In the Boston MTA, this license indicates USCC (through Maine RSA #1) has frequencies in the Portland, ME area. Also in the MTA, this license indicates USCC (through NH #1 Rural Cellular) has frequencies in the Lebanon, NH area.

 

In the Washington MTA, this license indicates USCC (through USCOC of Cumberland) has frequencies for the Cumberland, MD area.

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Here's where I have to disagree with Sprint only being able to get one - Sprint bought Nextel too high. If they took Alltel first, they'd have better revenue and not have to engage in a "merger of equals". They would have been able to buy Nextel at a much lower price and make faster progress clearing Nextel spectrum for CDMA 1X. That would have left Sprint with more capital, enabled them to have better coverage, and given them more flexibility in spectrum auctions for 700 MHz.

 

That would have been ideal for CDMA users who wanted to shake free of Big Red.

 

 

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Assuming some one else doesn't get to nextel first. Nextel really didn't have all that much in way of an evolution path.

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Here's where I have to disagree with Sprint only being able to get one - Sprint bought Nextel too high. If they took Alltel first, they'd have better revenue and not have to engage in a "merger of equals". They would have been able to buy Nextel at a much lower price and make faster progress clearing Nextel spectrum for CDMA 1X. That would have left Sprint with more capital, enabled them to have better coverage, and given them more flexibility in spectrum auctions for 700 MHz.

 

That would have been ideal for CDMA users who wanted to shake free of Big Red.

 

 

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At the time of the Sprint / Nextel merger, nobody thought about the explosion of mobile data services beyond the use of email. There was no Netflix or other high data intensive service. Alltel was not cheap and yes had coverage but not the customers by number. Back in the days like today, it's all a game of number.

I see at the end a Sprint / T-Mobile merger and if Dish get's into the market, some of the combined assets will be spun off to Dish to gain FCC/DOJ approval.

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At the time of the Sprint / Nextel merger, nobody thought about the explosion of mobile data services beyond the use of email. There was no Netflix or other high data intensive service. Alltel was not cheap and yes had coverage but not the customers by number. Back in the days like today, it's all a game of number.

I see at the end a Sprint / T-Mobile merger and if Dish get's into the market, some of the combined assets will be spun off to Dish to gain FCC/DOJ approval.

At the time of the Nextel merger, Alltel had 12M customers, Sprint had like 23M. I was using email and calendar/contacts sync over the net. Granted it's not video, but people were using productivity applications over their Palm and Windows Phone. Sprint shunned the rural carriers, even significant ones like Alltel, USCC, RCC. Heck they ignored the large prepaid ones like MetroPCS and Leap. All of them bring customers and spectrum. Let's face it. Besides the BRS holdings Sprint is not spectrum rich. It does not hold a lot of midband spectrum. All of these companies would have enriched their subscriber base, their coffers and their spectrum trove. All of them were CDMA, except for RCC with an easy migration path. So they allowed them to enrich their competitors!

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The FCC License View data does not provide geographic disaggregation data (the Spectrum Dashboard uses a different data source that is too infrequently updated to be useful), so you must access the ULS by clicking on the hyperlink to US Cellular's license. The ULS page will provide a tab showing what markets they have.

 

In the Pittsburgh MTA, this license indicates USCC (through Hardy Cellular Telephone) has only frequencies in West Virginian parts of the MTA.

 

In the Boston MTA, this license indicates USCC (through Maine RSA #1) has frequencies in the Portland, ME area. Also in the MTA, this license indicates USCC (through NH #1 Rural Cellular) has frequencies in the Lebanon, NH area.

 

In the Washington MTA, this license indicates USCC (through USCOC of Cumberland) has frequencies for the Cumberland, MD area.

 

The PCS A/B blocks are licensed on an MTA basis.  MTAs are large -- they are roughly the size of entire states.  That is the problem.  USCC may hold partitioned and/or disaggregated chunks of PCS A block spectrum in the Boston MTA, Washington-Baltimore MTA, and Pittsburgh MTA, but none of that spectrum is in the titular cities proper, just in the outlying areas, possibly hundreds of miles distant.  Again, that automated site does not accurately and precisely account for such partitions and disaggregations.

 

AJ

 

You have to go by call sign within an MTA. He needs to increase his granularity because of the severe disaggregation and fragmentation in the PCS band.

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At the time of the Sprint / Nextel merger, nobody thought about the explosion of mobile data services beyond the use of email. There was no Netflix or other high data intensive service. Alltel was not cheap and yes had coverage but not the customers by number. Back in the days like today, it's all a game of number.

I see at the end a Sprint / T-Mobile merger and if Dish get's into the market, some of the combined assets will be spun off to Dish to gain FCC/DOJ approval.

Not with a Democratic administration. It aint happening!

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I see at the end a Sprint / T-Mobile merger and if Dish get's into the market, some of the combined assets will be spun off to Dish to gain FCC/DOJ approval.

Please tell us what assets softy would be willing to spin off. The whole point of a buyout would be to eliminate a competitor, not to create a credible one for a merger to be approved.

 

Here's an idea: there's a already a 4th credible competitor. Problem solved! Lol

 

 

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Please tell us what assets softy would be willing to spin off. The whole point of a buyout would be to eliminate a competitor, not to create a credible one for a merger to be approved.

 

Here's an idea: there's a already a 4th credible competitor. Problem solved! Lol

 

 

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T-mobile's network can be totally divested to Dish which can host Dish's spectrum. Actually they can start hosting Dish's spectrum before the actual network is divested.

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T-mobile's network can be totally divested to Dish which can host Dish's spectrum. Actually they can start hosting Dish's spectrum before the actual network is divested.

And dish will start out with how many customers? Apparently zero if the entire TMO network is gonna is gonna be divested.

 

And Charlie would buy a network with 0 people to offset the OPEX?

 

 

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You have to go by call sign within an MTA. He needs to increase his granularity because of the severe disaggregation and fragmentation in the PCS band.

He's already doing that, to an extent. He can only present what the License View data gives him. And he has been attempting to use the ULS as the data source instead, but the awkward and inconsistent data format makes it very difficult, so he hasn't switched over.

 

Besides, it wasn't even hard to find the licenses. Clicking on an area, then clicking on the operator name, then clicking on "Market" in the ULS tab presents you with the information you seek.

 

Did no one notice the hyperlinked operator names and not click on them?

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And dish will start out with how many customers? Apparently zero if the entire TMO network is gonna is gonna be divested.

 

And Charlie would buy a network with 0 people to offset the OPEX?

 

 

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Spinning off the T-Mobile network would only give lots and lots of people motivation to bolt to whatever company got that network. Dish would have the spectrum to be a fearsome competitor with their spectrum and T-Mobile's network.

 

If Dish and T-Mobile would merge or partner anyway, that makes sense.

 

- Dish has a primarily rural customer base. Lots of people and resellers out there that can sell Dish/T-Mobile services in rural areas.

- T-Mobile urban customers get the benefit of AWS-4, 20x20. That's awesome for T-Mobile customers in 5x5 or 10x10 T-Mobile markets. Then add aggregation and it's awesome for those in 20x20 markets because you can push up to 300 Mbps on 4x2 MIMO, 600 Mbps on 4x4 MIMO if/when devices with 4x4 MIMO make it to the market.

- Dish gains T-Mobile corporate/TPR stores to sell Hoppers and Slings in urban areas. They could also sell Sling OTT plans through those stores in places like New York that don't have easy access to satellite line of sight.

- Dish could even sell an LTE Hopper that provides home access in rural areas.

 

The negative is "does Dish keep the Uncarrier culture?" Jury is still out there. Dish might raise rates to pay for all that spectrum and rural upgrading they will do.

 

 

 

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Spinning off the T-Mobile network would only give lots and lots of people motivation to bolt to whatever company got that network. Dish would have the spectrum to be a fearsome competitor with their spectrum and T-Mobile's network.

 

If Dish and T-Mobile would merge or partner anyway, that makes sense.

 

- Dish has a primarily rural customer base. Lots of people and resellers out there that can sell Dish/T-Mobile services in rural areas.

- T-Mobile urban customers get the benefit of AWS-4, 20x20. That's awesome for T-Mobile customers in 5x5 or 10x10 T-Mobile markets. Then add aggregation and it's awesome for those in 20x20 markets because you can push up to 300 Mbps on 4x2 MIMO, 600 Mbps on 4x4 MIMO if/when devices with 4x4 MIMO make it to the market.

- Dish gains T-Mobile corporate/TPR stores to sell Hoppers and Slings in urban areas. They could also sell Sling OTT plans through those stores in places like New York that don't have easy access to satellite line of sight.

- Dish could even sell an LTE Hopper that provides home access in rural areas.

 

The negative is "does Dish keep the Uncarrier culture?" Jury is still out there. Dish might raise rates to pay for all that spectrum and rural upgrading they will do.

 

 

 

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I agree a TMO dish merger or partnership would be awesome

 

In TMO 20fdd markets, TMO subs would get 40sdl + 20x20 for 450mbps.

 

TMO would aggregate 40sdl with 5fdd 700a for an amazing nationwide experience.

 

But the problem is dish is not gonna buy a network with zero customers.

 

Scale scale scale we heard. That's the problem.

Network with zero customers has 0 scale.

 

Dish would def partner with TMO because they have more leverage over TMO bc sprint doesn't need dish spectrum for capacity whereas TMO does.

 

 

 

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From what I understand, this thread is for discussions on 10x10 Sprint PCS carriers. Not sure if wet dreams about a T-Mobile/Dish merger fall under this category. That said, I'm just going to leave this here..ImageUploadedByTapatalk1425766250.446501.jpg

 

 

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That said, I'm just going to leave this here..attachicon.gifImageUploadedByTapatalk1425766250.446501.jpg

 

Is that the best you can do?

 

 

AJ

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Please tell us what assets softy would be willing to spin off. The whole point of a buyout would be to eliminate a competitor, not to create a credible one for a merger to be approved.

 

Here's an idea: there's a already a 4th credible competitor. Problem solved! Lol

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Sprint has already a lot of spectrum and it would be likely that a merged SprinT-mobile would have to part with some spectrum. Additional assets could also be in play but that would be even more speculation.

Dish Network would be the only party that would be interested as AT&T and Verizon are much larger companies and it would be preferrable if a new small company enters the market.

 

Dish would be forced to decide if they like to sell or start to build their own network with their current spectrum assets.

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Sprint has already a lot of spectrum and it would be likely that a merged SprinT-mobile would have to part with some spectrum. Additional assets could also be in play but that would be even more speculation.

Dish Network would be the only party that would be interested as AT&T and Verizon are much larger companies and it would be preferrable if a new small company enters the market.

 

Dish would be forced to decide if they like to sell or start to build their own network with their current spectrum assets.

You think another entrant wants to compete against att, vzw, TMO+sprint with some spectrum leftovers and zero customers?

 

 

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The FCC License View data does not provide geographic disaggregation data (the Spectrum Dashboard uses a different data source that is too infrequently updated to be useful), so you must access the ULS by clicking on the hyperlink to US Cellular's license. The ULS page will provide a tab showing what markets they have.

 

In the Pittsburgh MTA, this license indicates USCC (through Hardy Cellular Telephone) has only frequencies in West Virginian parts of the MTA.

 

In the Boston MTA, this license indicates USCC (through Maine RSA #1) has frequencies in the Portland, ME area. Also in the MTA, this license indicates USCC (through NH #1 Rural Cellular) has frequencies in the Lebanon, NH area.

 

In the Washington MTA, this license indicates USCC (through USCOC of Cumberland) has frequencies for the Cumberland, MD area.

 

I didn't know that they could pick an area of a larger license, I thought it was as it was sold. This makes sense given their actual service area's, but does beg the question... who has the other parts of the licenses?  Do the spectrum holding companies that you have listed lease the license to other companies, or are they leasing it from someone else to provide service in the rural areas that other companies have under-served? 

 

And I am guessing that the same thing is happening with the AWS licenses that cover a huge percentage of the country on the map... they probably only own/use the spectrum in the Midwest where they have service.  This could make the spectrum gained from swapping much less valuable.  

 

Personally I know that there are spots where purchasing USCC would benefit me, and it would make sprint a DOMINANT force in the midwest... but I can see that it might not be financially better then an organic expansion in the areas sprint sees as growth opportunities. 

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I didn't know that they could pick an area of a larger license, I thought it was as it was sold. This makes sense given their actual service area's, but does beg the question... who has the other parts of the licenses?  Do the spectrum holding companies that you have listed lease the license to other companies, or are they leasing it from someone else to provide service in the rural areas that other companies have under-served? 

 

And I am guessing that the same thing is happening with the AWS licenses that cover a huge percentage of the country on the map... they probably only own/use the spectrum in the Midwest where they have service.  This could make the spectrum gained from swapping much less valuable.  

 

Personally I know that there are spots where purchasing USCC would benefit me, and it would make sprint a DOMINANT force in the midwest... but I can see that it might not be financially better then an organic expansion in the areas sprint sees as growth opportunities. 

The licenses are fragmented. The FCC permits disaggregation and partitioning, which can be used to split it in the frequency domain, the geographical domain, or both. In this case, the splits occurred in both frequency and geographical space. You can see the other licenses in the MTA if you go to the "Define View" pull-down menu and select "Other Licenses in Market" and click "GO".

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I didn't know that they could pick an area of a larger license, I thought it was as it was sold. This makes sense given their actual service area's, but does beg the question... who has the other parts of the licenses?  Do the spectrum holding companies that you have listed lease the license to other companies, or are they leasing it from someone else to provide service in the rural areas that other companies have under-served?

 

You may be thinking of this backward.  USCC has never held an entire MTA based PCS A/B block license -- what you could deem an original call sign license.  All of those licenses in the contiguous US are in the hands of Sprint, AT&T, T-Mobile, and VZW -- in basically that descending order.  So, USCC did not sell off or lease the spectrum in the aforementioned metro areas of Boston, Washington, and Pittsburgh.  Rather, for cash or trade, other licensees partitioned or disaggregated that spectrum to USCC in smaller markets outside of the titular markets.

 

AJ

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You think another entrant wants to compete against att, vzw, TMO+sprint with some spectrum leftovers and zero customers?

 

 

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Dish has currently a subscriber pool which it could use to offer services and I am sure that Dish is looking into mobile broadband solutions, and not compete as full service wireless carrier. Dish can use their current infrastructure to service their customers. Dish wants to push video and I think it sees wireless just as another pipe. I think they could offer a fixed service for video and broadband.

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Dish has currently a subscriber pool which it could use to offer services and I am sure that Dish is looking into mobile broadband solutions, and not compete as full service wireless carrier. Dish can use their current infrastructure to service their customers. Dish wants to push video and I think it sees wireless just as another pipe. I think they could offer a fixed service for video and broadband.

They already have a fixed video service.

Yes they want fixed broadband and like any business, they'll do it the cheapest way possible: lease 40mhz sdl to TMO in the cities in exchange for TMO creating a rural fixed wireless.

None if that requires buying TMO network by itself.

 

 

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