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Marcelo Claure, Town Hall Meetings, New Family Share Pack Plan, Unlimited Individual Plan, Discussion Thread


joshuam

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Sprint's church was 1.84% the last quarter...which was much improved from previous quarters. T-Mobile just reported 1.3% church for this past quarter

 

Just for comparison convenience, that's compared to churn of 1.01% for AT&T, and 0.90% for Verizon 

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Just for comparison convenience, that's compared to churn of 1.01% for AT&T, and 0.90% for Verizon

Yeah but you have to look at it from a historical perspective... 1.3% is almost the lowest in T-Mobile history (last quarter was fractionally smaller).

 

They are also port-positive on every carrier and have been for the last nine quarters. In Q2'15: 1.4 from Verizon, 1.9 from AT&T and 2.5 from Sprint.

Edited by luvixuha
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That's funny. I actually noticed the opposite on Facebook ads for T-Mobile. Lots of people thanking them for better service, great CS, etc. Obviously some negatives in there, but generally positive. Sprint's ads on Facebook used to be almost 100% negative, but I am seeing a small number of positive posts just scrolling through. Obviously not scientific at all, just an observation.

I sometimes go read carriers' Facebook sites to read comments and see what the general, less tech-minded customers have to say about their service with the carriers. It is a good way to learn the mainstream opinions on there when the majority of news reporting and tech community sites such as Engadget, Verge, Fierce, S4GRU, TmoNews, Are, etc. mostly have comments from those more tech-minded.

 

I went to the Sprint Facebook site the other day and noticed while there seems to be fewer network and service complaints, there are more complaints from loyal customers of Sprint, complaining about how Sprint won't let them have the promo plans, how they find it unfair new customers get better rates, etc.

 

I think carriers really ought to simplify their rate plans and have whatever is chosen as the official rate plan be available for all customers, rather than relying on limited promotional plans. Although, there are loyal Sprint customers who say the Everything Data 1500 is best, better than the promotional plans even.

 

An idea I have for Sprint, if they wanted to bring back the ED-like plan without unlimited data, for instance, they could offer a deal for $65 monthly on the first line, and $35 each additional line, where every line would get 15gb data, 1500 minutes and 1500 texts. Other than those who really need/want unlimited data, that plan would satisfy many customers.

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1500 texts? You obviously don't have teenage children.

 

I have 4 lines on ED1500 and we use an average of less than 500 minutes (only coming close when the wife has extended business conference calls)...but 1500 texts wouldn't be good for even a week. However that's changing a bit as they seem to use Snapchat much more frequently now.

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I thought tmobile was still denying their new upgrade plan was a lease:

 

dce2a4070cf44ec9e8d22a7e972434d9.jpg

 

Sent from my SM-G925P using Tapatalk

 

 

Where did T-Mobile say that? It's quite clear that it is a lease. All the references when you sign up say lease, the online account says "Lease Details", etc.

 

When Sprint launched leasing, John Legere said it was dumb. Now he doesn't...lol

 

But T-Mobile's lease is different than Sprint's...18 month vs 24 month, and the cost is the same as EIP.

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Where did T-Mobile say that? It's quite clear that it is a lease. All the references when you sign up say lease, the online account says "Lease Details", etc.

 

When Sprint launched leasing, John Legere said it was dumb. Now he doesn't...lol

 

But T-Mobile's lease is different than Sprint's...18 month vs 24 month, and the cost is the same as EIP.

 

Ah, gotcha. I just remembered Legere trashing on Sprint's lease, and now they're advertising it on FB.

 

As a side note, I cropped that screenshot and it looked a lot smaller in Tapatalk than when I came back and looked at it on the PC.

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Just for comparison convenience, that's compared to churn of 1.01% for AT&T, and 0.90% for Verizon 

 

I still can't get over how Verizon is keeping their churn so damn low. Kudos to them for this, but it's not going to last. Simple economics tells us this. At least, it won't last without some price cuts. :D

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1500 texts? You obviously don't have teenage children.

 

I have 4 lines on ED1500 and we use an average of less than 500 minutes (only coming close when the wife has extended business conference calls)...but 1500 texts wouldn't be good for even a week. However that's changing a bit as they seem to use Snapchat much more frequently now.

Hmm... I didn't think 1500 was a bad number.

 

I had an idea for a points system to be used as a replacement for unlimited voice/text, which perhaps I should have used that idea instead. Customers could purchase "points", which would be used as a choice between voice calling and texting, say 1 minute or 1 text for 1 point. 3000 points could be $15 monthly, then people could choose which usage matters more to them, so people don't end up paying for unlimited they don't need.

 

Or is 3000 texts per line still not enough monthly?

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Might be different now, but I've seen as many as 6-8k texts/mth on accounts of friends....

 

But what's the point of limiting or paying for them? Who even has plans like that anymore?

 

It's all about that data...

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You guys think 6-7k a month is a lot? My sister has hit 150k in a month before and I'm regularly at 5-8k and I barely send out going texts.

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You guys think 6-7k a month is a lot? My sister has hit 150k in a month before and I'm regularly at 5-8k and I barely send out going texts.

That means your sister, on average (assuming she gets 10 hrs of sleep a day), sent/received 5.7 texts per minute for an entire month (31 days.)  That's a lot of texting!

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That means your sister, on average (assuming she gets 10 hrs of sleep a day), sent/received 5.7 texts per minute for an entire month (31 days.)  That's a lot of texting!

That was at a period where she got more like 4-5 hours of sleep a day. Either way it was crazy, and I'm quite glad she isn't like that now for many reasons. 

 

Supposedly Myway plans are getting the ax soon, I'm glad I got mine when I did.

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I shouldn't have read the comments on the video. People are saying "You don't have to try Sprint, they suck."

 

This is is exactly what baffles me about consumers on social media. They're quick to tell you don't try something to see if it works for you. You should just trust them when they say it sucks. How would they know it sucks if they're just relaying what their sister's father's cousin's ex-girlfriend said when she had service 3 years ago.

 

Either way I want to hear what he has to say about his service in a few months.

 

Yeah, it's stomach-turning. First, ancient perceptions. Many people, primarily in non-urban areas, still use Verizon out of fear and compliance (everyone else does, why not me?). If you ask these people about cell service, they'll probably tell you they don't know about AT&T, or they sucked 5-10 years ago when they or someone they know tried them, Sprint sucked 5-10 years ago when they or someone they know tried them, and most still don't know T-Mobile exists (but rightfully so-- especially those who bought their marketing, tried them, and found out). 

 

Second, marketing. Verizon has had many people with clever marketing and tower placement. Verizon, outside of urban areas, never really did have such excellent coverage in their heyday a few years ago. As long as 2-3 years ago did they finally catch up in many areas. In fact, if you traveled to the wrong area, it got very ugly. Nada mixed with 1 bar of 1X -- not fun. They do better with overall LTE and coverage primarily out west, but wow when they're not good. 

 

On the flip side, I remember some encounters a few years and nearly a decade ago, where a new Sprint user gladly enjoyed better native service than Verizon through post or prepaid and switched to them fully as a result (even in semirural areas)!

 

Third, wtf. 2-3 years ago, no one outside of cities knew or cared about T-Mobile's existence or service and I doubt they were so adored in most urban areas, either. They were like USCC to a New Yorker.

 

It goes to show you. 

Edited by cortney
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I still can't get over how Verizon is keeping their churn so damn low. Kudos to them for this, but it's not going to last. Simple economics tells us this. At least, it won't last without some price cuts. :D

As long as they continue to maintain the best overall network, I don't see their churn going up by much.

 

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

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Building the Next Generation Network

Sprint has been making substantial progress in delivering a network with the reliability, capacity and speed customers demand. Ottendorfer, in his capacity leading the Technology Office, will lead the company’s efforts to build on that progress by deploying the next generation of its wireless network. This will capitalize on Sprint’s rich spectrum portfolio, increasing coverage and capacity by significantly densifying the company’s network.

The company is uniting the Network and Information Technology functions to capture tremendous advantages, including greater efficiency in designing, rapidly deploying and scaling the next generation network.

 

“Günther is a world-class innovator and he comes to us with the rich experience of leading wireless network transformations at telecommunications companies around the world,” said Claure. “He is uniquely qualified to lead us in building on the momentum of our ongoing network improvements and then moving us forward to create a network for the future.”

Ottendorfer will arrive at Sprint with more than 25 years of experience leading global technology teams. Most recently, as group chief technology officer Telekom Austria Group, Ottendorfer was responsible for driving innovation, quality and synergies in all seven central and eastern European countries that Telekom Austria Group serves.

 

At Telekom Austria Group, Ottendorfer led a number of successful projects that included major wireless network expansion and improvement, the introduction of new technologies and efforts to make the organization more efficient.

 

Prior to that position, Ottendorfer served as managing director networks of Optus Singtel in Sydney Australia from 2011-2013. He also spent nine years at Deutsche Telekom working in a variety of European countries, eventually leading network planning for all of Deutsche Telekom’s mobile networks across Europe.

 

Network Virtualization is a prime example of the advanced technology that offers the company the ability to increase the power of its wireless network, deploy improvements rapidly, manage it with greater flexibility and more easily introduce new services over the network. Ottendorfer was ahead of the curve in recognizing this technology as a future trend in the mobile industry and he championed its use while serving as Group CTO at Telekom Austria Group.

 

“I am truly honored and excited about the opportunity to join Sprint and work in the biggest telecom market of the world,” said Ottendorfer. “I see a tremendous amount of potential in the company and its network. The team has established strong momentum and I look forward to building on that.”

Robbiati and Ottendorfer will relocate to Kansas City with their families.

Via Sprint's Newsroom

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Sprint shaking up their top brass..

 

http://newsroom.sprint.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=11956

 

 

and finally some verification of the "Next generation network" project moving forward.

Glad to see John Saw getting promoted. He's been doing wonders for the Sprint network, and it's nice to see him progressing higher in the company. I hope he gets to stick around for years to come. :)

 

-Anthony

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That was at a period where she got more like 4-5 hours of sleep a day. Either way it was crazy, and I'm quite glad she isn't like that now for many reasons.

 

Supposedly Myway plans are getting the ax soon, I'm glad I got mine when I did.

Aug 6th we stop selling myway plans. So going forward its all the share packs or $60/$110 unlimited plans. If you do a contract add $25.
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Well, obviously I was wrong with my estimates on texting. Not that I have a problem with unlimited calling and texting, though it would be nice to see some sort of plan available without it for those who use less of it. The ED 1500 is a great plan for those who use data mostly and less on calling/texting.

 

I'm not aware of how my idea of this could be done, technically, but could texting just be part of data usage? I don't know exactly how much data it would take, though I can't imagine it is much. Or perhaps leave texting at unlimited, but have calling minutes back at a cheaper monthly rate. For instance, it would be nice if AT&T and Verizon did that, and lowered the Edge add a line to $5 monthly from the current $15 monthly.

 

Also, nice to hear some new news on the NGN project. Hopefully there will be more of it soon along with results so at least some of those harsh comments against Sprint reduce somewhat.

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