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iPhone 6 and Sprint Spark


derrph
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I should clarify that I work around water on a regular basis, so a waterproof case is a necessity for me.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

I used to go boating with my 4s not in a case. And I would text while on the boat or in the water. I was really risky with it lmao. 

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I used to go boating with my 4s not in a case. And I would text while on the boat or in the water. I was really risky with it lmao.

More like crazy!

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

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FireChat enables iPhones to leverage iOS 7's Apple Multipeer Connectivity framework to link directly via Bluetooth personal area networks (PANs), peer-to-peer Wi-Fi or a traditional Wi-Fi network, obviating the need for access to a cellular network. OpenGarden's website indicates the company is working on a Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) Android version of FireChat as well.

 

 

 

http://www.fiercewireless.com/tech/story/apples-ios-7-taking-cellular-out-networking/2014-03-30

There is already a google version. Does the app work across different platforms?

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Can you imagine if the 5S was triband on sprint? Since Sprint's network isn't fully eCSFB matured yet, millions of iPhone users would be having problems making and receiving phone calls. Making the 5S dual-band was the best decision they could have made. Once the 6 is released, Sprint's network won't be having those issues anymore, so it'll be safe for an eCSFB reliant iPhone to hit the market.

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More like crazy!

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

I've also been called that. Fortunately the 5S space grey seems to be much more resistant to scratches than the 5 black was. In fact, its considerably more resistant.

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Can you imagine if the 5S was triband on sprint? Since Sprint's network isn't fully eCSFB matured yet, millions of iPhone users would be having problems making and receiving phone calls. Making the 5S dual-band was the best decision they could have made. Once the 6 is released, Sprint's network won't be having those issues anymore, so it'll be safe for an eCSFB reliant iPhone to hit the market.

I thought that the iPhone didn't use eCSFB. Could've sworn I read that somewhere. Maybe robert said it?

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I thought that the iPhone didn't use eCSFB. Could've sworn I read that somewhere. Maybe robert said it?

The iphone doesn't.

 

Sent from my Nexus 5

 

 

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It doesn't, it's a good thing it doesn't currently.

Then if the iPhone 6 was triband, would there be similar issues that triband phones are currently experiencing? Or would they be non existent. 

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Then if the iPhone 6 was triband, would there be similar issues that triband phones are currently experiencing? Or would they be non existent.

If Apple decides to go triband with the 6 and they keep their designs for how the device receives texts and calls now, then I don't think people will have problems. The problem woth triband devices is that they have one radio pathway, and they rely on CSFB to kick them back to 3G for a text or call. Where-as the iPhone has always been single path and relies on the software of itself to ping the 3G side of the network every "x" amount of seconds.

 

I mean, Apple doesn't have to use CSFB, right?

 

Short answer: No, I'm pretty sure the problems would be non-existent.

 

-Anthony

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If Apple decides to go triband with the 6 and they keep their designs for how the device receives texts and calls now, then I don't think people will have problems. The problem woth triband devices is that they have one radio pathway, and they rely on CSFB to kick them back to 3G for a text or call. Where-as the iPhone has always been single path and relies on the software of itself to ping the 3G side of the network every "x" amount of seconds.

 

I mean, Apple doesn't have to use CSFB, right?

 

Short answer: No, I'm pretty sure the problems would be non-existent.

 

-Anthony

 

Apple went with the automatic pings to eliminate such a problem based on the fact that the iPhone 5S is Dual Band to Sprint, but is actually a 13 LTE band device (model A1453, the Sprint & Verizon variant), and therefore they took an extremely smart approach to this whole situation by using pings to check. And the ping is so short lived that you would never even know it was happening unless a call comes in or you know how the tech worked.

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Apple went with the automatic pings to eliminate such a problem based on the fact that the iPhone 5S is Dual Band to Sprint, but is actually a 13 LTE band device (model A1453, the Sprint & Verizon variant), and therefore they took an extremely smart approach to this whole situation by using pings to check. And the ping is so short lived that you would never even know it was happening unless a call comes in or you know how the tech worked.

This might explain why I sometimes have people complain that it took forever for me to answer their call, even though on my end my iPhone 5 only rang once. My wife's iPhone 5c does the same exact thing.

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1.5 rings before calls come through to our iPhones usually. At most 3 rings in a bad signal area.

 

When I used a Sprint S3 it took the same amount of time before it rang through, as well as my Nexus 5 that I had, so Apple hasn't caused any noticeable lag in receiving calls by doing it the way they did in my educated opinion.

 

Att and Verizon also have delays before calls go through, att is network side and I'm not sure about Verizon. T-Mobile is the only network (aside from att 2G) that doesn't have any sort of courtesy ringback tone when calling a TMO line.

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There is already a google version. Does the app work across different platforms?

 

The iOS version of Firechat was intro'd 2 weeks before the Android version of Firechat ( intro'd April 3rd )...

 

Neither version is cross platform..

 

But BOTH versions are anonymous and ephemeral — conversation streams disappear as soon as the app is closed — it’s designed to create proximity-based hyperlocal networks. In NEARBY chat mode  - Both iOS & android versions use Wi-Fi and Bluetooth links to connect to nearby devices without using cellular internet at all making it extremely secure and private.

 

Everyone mode uses wifi or cellular and is thus not private..

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This might explain why I sometimes have people complain that it took forever for me to answer their call, even though on my end my iPhone 5 only rang once. My wife's iPhone 5c does the same exact thing.

 

There's more to this.  My family uses both iOS and android phones.. and both ( the receiving caller ) has had 1 ring on their side while the caller had 10 rings.. sometimes on either iOS/Android we have had instances of hearing NO RINGS - but we know someone called because we get a voice msg !

 

I think it's a Sprint problem seen more in areas not upgraded or being upgraded.. Ive seen it less lately..

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Firechat is strange. Under that "everyone" tab, is that really all firechat users? It doesn't seem like many are using it.

 

I could be on firechat talking NEARBY ( local ) which would be only over blutooth or wifi..  

Like biggest reason to use firechat is to use NEARBY chat..

 

NEARBY chat conversations are completely unseen ( and thus not seen in EVERYONE chat ) since  bluetooth has a max range of about 300 feet ( 300 ft is in  Bluetooth 4.0 in most newer phones )

 

If you're using firechat for the reason it was designed - max security and privacy - then you'll be using it in NEARBY mode which means most users probably aren't using EVERYONE mode ( EVERYONE mode is over wi-fi or celullar internet )...

 

Nearby mode doesn't use cellular networks so you're not able to be monitored..  

 

Hope this explains why you don't see many people in EVERYONE mode.. Although it's an option it was designed more for NEARBY chat which makes it secure.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Getting back to cases - when I got my Sprint 5 there was only one case available at the local Sprint store and it was a weird rubbery russian case I really like.

 

I dropped the phone once and the case is such that it recesses the screen away from not hitting the ground in cases like that.

 

The information I have on the next iPhone is there will be two sizes: 4.7 and 5.5 inches and currently the larger version will take longer to come to the market since they were supposedly having problems finding a battery that large but thin enough.

 

See:

www.macrumors.com

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Getting back to cases - when I got my Sprint 5 there was only one case available at the local Sprint store and it was a weird rubbery russian case I really like.

 

I dropped the phone once and the case is such that it recesses the screen away from not hitting the ground in cases like that.

 

The information I have on the next iPhone is there will be two sizes: 4.7 and 5.5 inches and currently the larger version will take longer to come to the market since they were supposedly having problems finding a battery that large but thin enough.

 

See:

www.macrumors.com

 

The leaks seem to be coming from the some of the same sources who leaked the finger print sensor.  The finger print sensor was leaked about 10 months before the 5S release..  this "rumor" has much more credibility because its coming from suppliers and  wall street analyst ..Even Apple's own internal study said last year they were losing out on a growing smart phone market because some people simply wanted a bigger screen.  Apples number of phones sold HAS INCREASED every year and so have their profits, but the market is growing so fast that it's percentage of market share ( of the entire market ) has barely grown world wide. Things like screens need to be ready long before anything else in order to have enough stock piled to build millions of phones ( millions of phones aren't built in a few weeks ) ..

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I'm guessing there's no integrated LTE because the MDM9635 is being used instead. That should integrate any LTE band Apple wants with no issue.

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  • 3 weeks later...

While in the Apple store today, the rep kept saying to me and a few others that WWDC is around the corner, and you never know what'll be announced. It seems like even store employees are hoping for a summer release of the 6.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

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I hope it's sooner rather than later. My iPhone 5 batter is not what it used to be.

Understandable. My friend has my iPhone 5 and I see her charging it more and more than she used to.

 

 

Sent from Josh's iPhone 5S using Tapatalk 2

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