Jump to content
  • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Similar Content

    • By lilotimz
      Samsung TDD-LTE gear which are being utilized in Clearwire priority sites. .   Clearwire - Samsung TDD-LTE RRH SLS-BD106Q & Antennas           Samsung TD-LTE RRUs mounted behind BRS/EBS Antenna     Sprint 2500-2600 mhz TD-LTE Setup Note the Antennas are much thicker and fatter than the antennas being utilized by Sprint Network Vision.  
       

       
      Clearwire TD-LTE Base Station / Cabinet
      May be subject to change as TD-LTE sites start being integrated into the Network Vision setups.
       

       

       

       
      Happy Hunting!
        I'll clean the post up this weekend when I have more time.   Courtesy of Sbolen from Missouri market. Samsung TDD RRH SLS-BD104Q1
      Samsung TDD RRH SLS-BD106Q
    • By lilotimz
      Here are the Alcatel-Lucent (ALU) Network Vision equipment for Sprint. Their equipment consists of 2x base stations, 6 or 9 Remote Radio Unit (RRU) setups, and 1 standard NV antenna of with connectors on the bottom (4x PCS, 2x SMR). 

      Below are images of Alcatel-Lucent equipment. In these images, you will find Alcatel-Lucent base stations, Sprint Network Vision antennas, PCS 1900 & SMR 800 RRUs, and their configurations.
      Alcatel-Lucent 4x40w 25 MHz PCS 1900 B25 RRUs (Panasonic) [old]

      Alcatel-Lucent  4x45w 1900 MHz B25 RRU 

      ALU 2x50w B26 800 MHz RRU [KMW Communications]

      Older Panasonic Setup [4x40w 25 MHz B25]




      Standard Alcatel-Lucent Setup 
      Utilizes 2x50w 800 MHz B26 RRU and 4x45w 1900 MHz B25 RRU and compatible antennas. 



      Closer Look at the connectors on the bottom of the antennas

      Special Case Mexican IBEZ Setup
      Note the lack of 800 MHz RRUs though the antennas are capable of 800 MHz. 


      High Capacity Setup


      High Capacity no SMR 800 IBEZ setup


      * Credits go to those whom took the images of these equipment. You know who you are."
    • By jakeuten
      Just a bit of insight. I live near UMD in Duluth, MN. Sprint's signal is clearly much 'dirtier' with a 1.0 SNR compared to T-Mobile's 20.4 SNR. I don't have a screenshot from the same time, but I get about a 22 to 29 SNR with T. I know that AT&T uses RRU's but I'm not too sure about Sprint or T-Mobile. Also, I didn't even know they had L2500 where I live, but I force checked it on my Samsung S7 (AT&T). 


    • By S4GRU
      Did you know that with many Sprint (Uniband) LTE Android devices, the signal strength indicator at the top does not show your LTE signal strength? Even if 4G or LTE is displayed next to it?
       
      That's right!  This signal displayed here is your 1x (voice signal), and it is not your 3G EVDO signal strength, nor your LTE signal strength.  Regardless of whether it says 3G or 4G next to it. This is the cause of a lot of confusion.  Also, third party apps like NetMonitor do not show accurate LTE signal strengths. They also only show the 1x signal strength, even though they may reference being connected to LTE.
      The purpose of this thread is to help educate the masses, because many people think they have a strong LTE signal, when in fact they do not. And then they are unhappy, thinking that Sprint LTE is really slow, even with a strong signal. LTE performance is very signal strength dependent. So, when you have a weak signal, you can expect much slower than peak results.
       
      There is only one accurate way to get your LTE signal strength, and that is from your LTE Engineering screen in your Debug menu. And we will discuss the different ways to get that below.
       
      ...In HTC, Motorola & LG Sprint LTE devices:
      Go in to your phone app, and dial ##DEBUG# Select LTE Engineering Go down to RSRP. The number under RSRP shown in dBm is your LTE signal strength. ...In Samsung Sprint LTE devices:
      Go in to your phone app, and dial ##DEBUG# Enter 777468 for your lock code Select LTE Engineering Go down to RSRP. The number next to RSRP shown in dBm is your LTE signal strength. ...In the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 5:
      Go in to your phone app, and dial *#*#DEBUG#*#* Enter 777468 for your lock code Select LTE Engineering Go down to RSRP. The number next to RSRP shown in dBm is your LTE signal strength. The LTE Signal Strength Scale:
       
      Now you have determined your actual LTE signal strength in dBms your device is receiving, you can use the following scale below to determine its strength:
      Better than -88dBm RSRP is a strong signal Between -89dBm and -96dBm is a very good signal Between -97dBm and -105dBm is good Between -106dBm and -112dBm is fair Worse than -113dBm RSRP is poor Feel free to link people to this thread for explanation. Hopefully, this will clear up some confusion out there!
       
       
  • Posts

    • I need to rebuild a couple maps. I just usually take pictures and poast those. I am busy and unorganized so I could care less to sort a bunch of site data from the master map and copy paste again, or match GPS to a site and harvest from there. Have you guys found a way to automate something like SCP log sorting, what would be required to do this when starting fresh?  
    • Currently 13. Since I control the code though, I can add more if/when needed. 
    • On a capital raised basis Sprint does not look bankrupt at all.  The number of site improvements doing since the merger was announced is astounding.  Most of the sites in my market have been touched, most Clear sites tribanded, new sites made, small cells multiplied, Massive MIMO installed in dozens of places with more permits added just a few weeks ago.  They have more macro sites in my market than T-Mobile, a ton of small cells where T-Mobile has almost none.  Yet this work does not show in root metrics.  RF engineers from other firms have all said Sprint is short of backhaul as their key problem.  They blame management, which I believe is the key reason Masa wants this merger.
    • Bankruptcy is a business tool.  Sprint's biggest problem is its debt load. Bankruptcy was a real possibility when Masa first got involved. Another option would be to sell Boost.  This dragged on merger has cost Sprint in terms of reputation.  A big time advertising campaign would be required to explain what they have been doing to the network. The key issue to tackle would be backhaul which would come out of operating thus P&L.  Sprint needs a Cricket type solution -- pay for the maximum speed you want.
    • How many different icon choices?  
  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...