Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Rumor--Friends at US Cellular say they are going to be bought and they suspect it's Sprint doing the buying.   Speculation is it's going to be by the end of the year. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumor--Friends at US Cellular say they are going to be bought and they suspect it's Sprint doing the buying. Speculation is it's going to be by the end of the year.

Possibly they did close some locations in my area

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it means expanded coverage then I say go ahead!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing is U.S. Cellular's LTE tends to have high pings like 140ms at times. Not as bad as MetroPCS but still pretty bad. Can Sprint take U.S. Cellular cell sites and backhaul and re-purpose them for PCS LTE? In Pitt County, NC Sprint has a native footprint but U.S. Cellular has a stronger footprint and LTE across nearly the entire rural area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing is U.S. Cellular's LTE tends to have high pings like 140ms at times. Not as bad as MetroPCS but still pretty bad. Can Sprint take U.S. Cellular cell sites and backhaul and re-purpose them for PCS LTE? In Pitt County, NC Sprint has a native footprint but U.S. Cellular has a stronger footprint and LTE across nearly the entire rural area.

Why do that when they can use the existing 700 coverage?

 

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 2

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do that when they can use the existing 700 coverage?

 

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 2

 

Because Sprint doesn't have any 700Mhz compatible devices. SMR is good enough until the 600Mhz auction. They'd do better just selling that off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because Sprint doesn't have any 700Mhz compatible devices. SMR is good enough until the 600Mhz auction. They'd do better just selling that off.

They have already committed to adding band 12 (700 mHz A-C) to future devices.

 

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 2

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i cant speak for other markets but this would be amazing, at least coverage wise up here in northern new england where US Cellular has a pretty decent network for rural areas and sprint...not so much.

 

is it a fairly straight forward migration of the US cellular network over to Sprint if this were to happen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well since Leap is being bought up by AT&T, Sprint mind as well grab up US Cellular and improve the spectrum portfolios in the Mid-west and east.  I would much rather have had Sprint made a bid for Leap though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well since Leap is being bought up by AT&T, Sprint mind as well grab up US Cellular and improve the spectrum portfolios in the Mid-west and east.  I would much rather have had Sprint made a bid for Leap though.

Why? US Cellular fits in perfectly with their spectrum while Leap's primary asset was AWS. Also, until I see something more definitive this is just a silly rumor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

US cell has been rumored to be selling off parts of California to t-mobile iirc. As far as where I am it will never happen. In Wisconsin us cell is right on par with Verizon where as with the Chicago region there weren't doing so hot. So while it is possible that they might buy another portion of it there is no way the whole company itself will go down right now. In a few years maybe but not now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I'll regale you with a tale of extreme banal minutiae from 2006: my then girlfriend/now wife and I were driving through Wyoming, about 40 miles or so away from Cheyenne, and ended up getting stuck in a snowstorm when a FedEx truck rolled off a hill.

 

I had USC at the time, my wife had Sprint. She had no service up in the mountains; I had 2 bars and could make/receive calls and send text messages.

 

Point being, I love USC's coverage, and would welcome a buyout.

 

(Also: I propose we change the thread title to "US Cellular bye buy," because puns are awesome.)

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had USC at the time, my wife had Sprint. She had no service up in the mountains; I had 2 bars and could make/receive calls and send text messages.

 

I practically guarantee that was a phone RF or setting issue, not a USCC benefit.  USCC has no native coverage in Wyoming, and Sprint has very little.  But Sprint at the time had roaming agreements with both VZW and Alltel.

 

AJ

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I practically guarantee that was a phone RF or setting issue, not a USCC benefit.  USCC has no native coverage in Wyoming, and Sprint has very little.  But Sprint at the time had roaming agreements with both VZW and Alltel.

 

AJ

That makes sense. At the time, I was just a "I'm shopping the cheapest plans in my area" guy. Now, thanks the forum, I know better. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Possibly they did close some locations in my area

There was a store here. and in the malls. They're both gone lol. Idk if theres anything left of usc here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not support any USCC buyout.  I would rather see USCC remain independent.  And USCC is such a regionalized operator that acquiring it would do relatively little to help Sprint nationally.  Too little, too late.  Alltel/WWC was the rural prize that would have helped Sprint and its perception nationally, but as we know, that ship sailed several years ago.

 

Now, that said, USCC is effectively shifting gears in its LTE rollout from Lower 700 MHz to Cellular 850 MHz.  That will allow USCC to offer LTE capable iPhone models.  Additionally, if the LG G2 is any indication, Sprint band 26 LTE 800 devices will cover the entire superset band, including Cellular 850 MHz.  So, they would be compatible with USCC's band 5 LTE 850 deployment.

 

AJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(Also: I propose we change the thread title to "US Cellular bye buy," because puns are awesome.)

 

 

AJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a store here. and in the malls. They're both gone lol. Idk if theres anything left of usc here

 

Your area was sold to Sprint some time ago, hence the stores closing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would welcome this... I live in Southeastern Oklahoma and it would beef up native coverage to be usable when you venture out of the sprint areas where 1xrtt is all you get on USCC right now.  

 

/b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find this highly unlikely for various reasons

 

  • $250 million in network investments for gear from Alcatel-Lucent & Nortel
  • $500 million in internal billing system upgrades (which caused a shitstorm)
  • Extremely healthy relationship with Sprint including preferred relationship & other goodies
  • Carlson family owns 80+% of the company and the only way for a buyout is if the Carlson wants out or receives an offer that they cannot refuse. 

I find it more likely that USCC & Sprint goes into a partnership and opens up LTE / EVDO roaming over their Cellular 850 & PCS in exchange for roaming on sprint SMR 800 & PCS LTE.

 

Side note - Just a FYI, USCC hardly uses any fiber or microwave backhaul. The vast majority of their sites utilizes bonded T1 or T3 copper lines due to their rural nature and many of them are bogging down due to smart phone use. This is the same type of backhaul that Sprint rejected from Centurylink down in NM and had to reopen bids for new backhaul that met NV requirements. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your area was sold to Sprint some time ago, hence the stores closing. 

 Didn't even know. Thanks for the information :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Didn't even know. Thanks for the information :D

 

We wrote the most detailed breakdown of the Sprint-USCC spectrum transaction last fall.  But maybe you were not here yet, lol.

 

http://s4gru.com/index.php?/blog/1/entry-334-updated-sprint-uscc-spectrum-deal-sprint-gets-20-mhz-broader-in-the-city-of-broad-shoulders/

 

AJ

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be nice. My parents live in western Iowa and US Cellular and Verizon are the only options. They live in a huge coverage hole that used to be blanketed by Nextel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest tuwsy

I do not support any USCC buyout. I would rather see USCC remain independent. And USCC is such a regionalized operator that acquiring it would do relatively little to help Sprint nationally. Too little, too late. Alltel/WWC was the rural prize that would have helped Sprint and its perception nationally, but as we know, that ship sailed several years ago.

 

Now, that said, USCC is effectively shifting gears in its LTE rollout from Lower 700 MHz to Cellular 850 MHz. That will allow USCC to offer LTE capable iPhone models. Additionally, if the LG G2 is any indication, Sprint band 26 LTE 800 devices will cover the entire superset band, including Cellular 850 MHz. So, they would be compatible with USCC's band 5 LTE 850 deployment.

 

AJ

What's their 850 spectrum config gonna be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest tuwsy

They have already committed to adding band 12 (700 mHz A-C) to future devices.

 

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 2

Source please. Unless sprint is gonna buy out the rest of A block, this doesn't pass the smell test.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Similar Content

    • By legion125
      by Jeff Foster
      Sprint 4G Rollout Updates
      Friday, April 20, 2012 - 11:31 AM MDT
       
      Is there a "spectrum shortage?" Those two words send shivers down the spines of wireless industry executives. New services demand ever more spectrum, and, the story goes, there simply isn't enough spectrum available. An Internet search engine will easily find hundreds of thousands of links to the term "spectrum shortage." Many claim that it will be the downfall of America.
      The dwindling availability of a finite resource that can't be seen or touched threatens to possibly disrupt the mobile lifestyle that virtually every American has embraced. Dropped cellphone calls, delayed text messages and choppy video streams could become more frequent occurrences because the airwaves on which that data travel are nearing capacity at a time when mobile usage shows no signs of slowing.
      Federal regulators and industry players are searching for ways to fend off the supply-and-demand collision. Dish Network recently acquired a large block of vacant wireless spectrum that pending regulatory approval could be used for mobile broadband services.
       
      Short-Term Plan

      AT&T tried to merge with T-Mobile to solve its own capacity problem. It wanted to get its hands on T-Mobile spectrum. Still, that would have been only a temporary fix at best. Remember all the terrible stories about the quality of AT&T's wireless data network over the last few years? They say they simply don't have enough.
      The reason is that during the last few years, smartphones like the Apple iPhone and the many devices running Android emerged, and wireless data traffic grew like crazy. This problem jumped up and bit AT&T in the rear end. Suddenly, so many people were sucking so much data that the network could not handle it, due to spectrum shortage. Spectrum is like the size of the hose, and a wider hose is needed to carry more data for more customers.
      A couple good things are suddenly happening that may give carriers a little time to solve this increasing problem. Perhaps Verizon starting to sell the iPhone last spring has something to do with it. If so, then now with Sprint selling the iPhone, AT&T will have more breathing room, at least temporarily. That's the good news. However, that reprieve will only last a short while before the exploding smartphone and wireless data growth catches up. Then the other carriers will be faced with the same problem that's confronting AT&T.
      In the first quarter of 2011, the amount of data the average smartphone user consumed each month grew by 89 percent to 435 megabytes from 230 MB during the same quarter in 2010, according to Nielsen research. That's up from about 90 MB in 2009. For reference, the average size of an MP3 music file is about 4 MB.
      "Texting has always been traditionally viewed as a lightweight consumer of bandwidth, but if I start adding videos and pictures to my texts, that also starts consuming more bandwidth," said Tom Cullen, an executive vice president with Dish. But the primary growth driver will be video. Consumers can go through 5 gigabytes a month simply by streaming 10 minutes of standard definition video daily, he said.
       
      Data use is skyrocketing
      Data from the FCC indicate that more Americans are looking at their phones rather than talking on them. In 2009, 67 percent of available spectrum was utilized for voice and 33 percent for Internet data. Those percentages are now at 75 percent for data and 25 percent for voice. With each new iPhone release, data consumption grows. The iPhone 4S eats up twice as much data as the iPhone 4 and three times as much as the iPhone 3G, according to a study by network services firm Arieso. The new iPhone features Siri, a bandwidth-heavy voice recognition feature.
      The FCC estimates the U.S. will face a spectrum deficit of 90 MHz in 2013 and 275 MHz in 2014. To address the crunch, the federal government hopes to unleash 500 MHz of spectrum currently used for other purposes for wireless broadband by 2020. To put that figure in perspective, there is currently 547 MHz of spectrum allocated for mobile services, and AT&T and Verizon each own about 90 MHz.
      The government plans to hold so-called incentive auctions, which will try to lure spectrum owners such as TV broadcasters to sell their licenses. Verizon Wireless has agreed to purchase spectrum from a group of cable-TV companies. Sprint has expressed interest in working with Dish, which acquired the bulk of its 45 MHz of spectrum through two deals for bankrupt satellite technology companies. Dish chairman Charlie Ergen has said that the satellite-TV provider would prefer to partner with an existing wireless carrier on a high speed, 4G network. In response to recent comments by Sprint Chief Financial Officer Joe Euteneuer about the company's interest in working with Dish, Cullen said other wireless carriers are in the same situation. After failing to acquire T-Mobile, analysts expect AT&T to make a play for Dish, a long-rumored merger partner.
      As for T-Mobile, perhaps the most logical buyer is CenturyLink. T-Mobile's German-based parent company has indicated that it might exit the U.S. market. CenturyLink, which acquired Denver-based Qwest last year, is the third-largest landline phone company but does not own a wireless service, unlike the top two, AT&T and Verizon.
      Carriers are trying to offload as much traffic as they can to Wi-Fi networks, which ride on unlicensed spectrum. In some areas, they're installing picocells, which are smaller cell sites that can help boost capacity in dense areas.
      Finally, they're spending billions of dollars on LTE networks that use the airwaves more efficiently. Verizon and AT&T already have 4G LTE networks in place, and Sprint is moving to the technology. Dish says it hopes to enter the mobile broadband market with advanced LTE technology by late 2014 or early 2015. If Dish were to also offer voice service, it would come through VoLTE, which is similar to Voice-over-Internet Protocol (VOIP) phone services. Dish still needs the FCC to drop a condition tied to its spectrum that requires devices to have the ability to communicate with satellites, not just ground-based cell sites. The rule-making process that will likely remove the requirement is underway and could be completed by summer's end.
       
      Is there really a shortage problem?
      The problem, analysts argue, is that the operators that control the greatest amount of unused spectrum may be under-capitalized or unwilling to build out networks to use the spectrum. "We do not believe the U.S. faces a spectrum shortage," Jason Bazinet and Michael Rollins wrote in their Citigroup report. "Too much spectrum is controlled by companies that are not planning on rolling out services or face business and financial challenges. And of the spectrum that is being used, 90 percent of it has been allocated to existing 2G, 3G, and 3.5G wireless services by larger wireless carriers, such as AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint Nextel, and T-Mobile USA.
      In total, U.S. operators have licenses for about 538MHz of wireless spectrum. Only about 192MHz of that spectrum is currently being used. Most of the unused wireless spectrum is owned by companies such as Clearwire, LightSquared, and Dish Network. But so far, LightSquared has been stopped and the other companies have been slow to build networks using their available spectrum.
      "There is definitely a mismatch when it comes to spectrum in the wireless industry," said Paul Gallant, an analyst with MF Global in Washington, D.C. "There are some companies that have spectrum, but they're struggling financially. Or they aren't quite sure what to do with the spectrum. And others that have the money and business model, but need the spectrum." The move to 4G is very important for these operators because it offers them a more efficient way to deliver service. 4G LTE uses the available spectrum roughly 700 percent more efficiently than the 3G wireless technology EV-DO. Carriers will soon be refarming 3G spectrum to 4G LTE in several years.
      A key factor in encouraging efficient use of spectrum has been largely overlooked in carrier boardroom discussions. Wireless providers can add capacity, without obtaining more spectrum, by adding more and more cell sites. Additional cell sites in spectrum constrained areas allow the same spectrum to be used by even more consumers, as well as adding picocells and microcells to denser population areas. So far, the carriers have not expressed too much interest in this method due to additional capital expenditures and overhead. Their strategy is like what Microsoft, Apple and Google have used. It's just cheaper to buy what you need than to invest the time and energy to do the actual work.
      So what can the wireless companies do? To some extent, re-farming their existing networks will help. But so will finding ways to use other spectrum. For example, only T-Mobile lets users make phone calls using Wi-Fi, yet most of the mobile devices available from carriers have this capability; the carriers just don't enable it.
      Allowing Wi-Fi calling could unload millions of voice and data users on to alternative networks and ease the spectrum crunch, at least to some extent. Encouraging VoIP use would also help for two reasons. VoIP doesn't require a lot of bandwidth, and it means that the phone in question uses only the data spectrum, not both voice and data while this is going on.
      These points illustrate that the carriers do have options beyond just buying up spectrum. They can offload more wireless traffic than they do now, build more cell sites into their networks and they can allow the use of other types of communications. While the spectrum crunch isn't going away, that doesn't mean that the process can't be slowed.
       
      Sensational graphic extolling the dire spectrum crisis. Maybe a tad exaggerated???
       
       
      Images courtesy: Spectrum Bridge, iqmetrix.com
       
      Source: FierceWireless.com, Denver Post, Ecommercetimes.com, CNET
    • By Conan Kudo
      Now all your WCS are belong to AT&T...
    • By KD8JBF
      Found an article on FierceWireless speculating that Sprint may not jump into the AWS auction...Thoughts?
       
      http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/analyst-sprint-might-pass-fccs-spectrum-auctions/2014-04-04?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal
       
    • By briank101
      I'm getting up to speed on all the bits and pieces of the Sprint network after getting my Moto X smartphone about 6 weeks ago. I was trying to find some info on the number of EVDO rev. A carriers per sector at a typical site in the PCS spectrum constrained Chicago market. I guess what I'm trying to find out is the effective EVDO air link capacity available to me in the outer Chicago suburbs. I would find it hard to believe if there is only one EVDO carrier serving the whole area of a sector with only 3.1 Mbps theoretical max to share with everyone in my area.
       
      Out where I live, a typical tower serves about a 3 mile radius which I calculate a 120 degree sector would cover the users in a 9.4 square miles area (with the 3 sectors of the tower would cover abaout 28.3 sq miles). Ideally I perhaps could use a spectrum analyzer which I could maybe borrow from work, but if someone here has the scoop, it would be very helpful.  Now if there is 2, 3 or 4 EVDO carriers per sector with the back haul to match, then I suspect there is some breathing room, and my phone perhaps can jump to the carrier that is least utilized, possibly by looking at SNR if I understand correctly.
       
      Also would I be correct to state that one 1X Adv carrier and 3 EVDO carriers would fit exactly into 5 MHz of spectrum?
       
      I appreciate any feedback as a brand new poster.
      Brian
    • By EmeraldReporter
      CDMA is leaps and bounds better then GSM...
       
      And LTE was built upon GSM...
       
      And WiMAX is a little something different.
       
      What did Qualcomm have as their 4G initiative? Was it better then LTE/WiMAX?
       
      Was Qualcomm involved in either LTE/WiMAX development? Any CDMA goodness within either?
  • Posts

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...