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The Iphone 5s & Iphone 5c [not Tri-Band LTE] (was "Next iPhone to be announced on September 10")

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I thought the PRL affected only voice/text?

No. The PRL controls if a phone searches for LTE in the GEO.

 

But unlike CDMA2000, the PRL just does not serve as a list of frequencies to direct the search.

 

AJ

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But unlike CDMA2000, the PRL just does not serve as a list of frequencies to direct the search.

 

AJ

Correct. Just an on/off switch basically. Only Qualcomm LTE chipsets seem to follow this spec as the Galaxy Nexus did not follow this.

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We all know that Sprint is working on Spark which will see peak speeds of around 60+ Mb ( they got 100 in a lab setting )

 

I read an article that Verizon is also beefing up with the acquired AWS spectrum ( Verizon purchased 122 Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) spectrum licenses in the U.S.

 

Additonal AWS spectrum added is in these areas of the USA for Verizon: http://www.phonearena.com/image.php?m=Articles.Images&f=name&id=50040&kw=&popup=1 )

 

..

 

A Verizon iPhone 5s user in NY hit 80 Mb down and 23 Mb up on his 5s.. there is a screenshot of many speedtest.. It won't be long before everyone is offering better speeds..

 

iPhone 5s hits 80 Mb here:

http://www.phonearena.com/news/Verizon-LTE-signal-measured-at-80Mbps-in-New-York-City_id48306

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Nexus 5 Launched & I think it's Tri-Band it supports bands 19/25/26 Tri-band right ?

 

 

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Nexus 5 Launched & I think it's Tri-Band it supports bands 19/25/26 Tri-band right ?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The bands that Sprint uses: 25 (1900 MHz), 26 (800 MHz), and 41 (2500/2600 MHz) are all supported by the Nexus 5. Therefore, it is a Tri-Band Sprint phone

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The bands that Sprint uses: 25 (1900 MHz), 26 (800 MHz), and 41 (2500/2600 MHz) are all supported by the Nexus 5. Therefore, it is a Tri-Band Sprint phone

 

Ohh okay now I get it. And congrats to all the nexus lovers lol. I believe both new iPads are Tri-band as well idk why Apple did it that but its Apple we never know.

 

 

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I believe both new iPads are Tri-band as well idk why Apple did it that but its Apple we never know.

 

No, the new iPad models are not Sprint tri band.  Relevant to Sprint, they are dual band 25/26 LTE 1900/800 -- just like this year's iPhone models.

 

AJ

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No, the new iPad models are not Sprint tri band. Relevant to Sprint, they are dual band 25/26 LTE 1900/800 -- just like this year's iPhone models.

 

AJ

Oh Okay , I must've misread the Bands page on the Apple site.

 

 

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The iPad air crammed 14 bands into one device. Unfortunately, not TD-LTE. My real technical guess? They're waiting for the next Qualcomm RF solution where they could go to even more bands.

 

I've also thought that a China Mobile iDevice could support SoftBank and Sprint. We just haven't seen that device released to find out yet.

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Remember when the iPhone was the only Sprint LTE smartphone to work through CSFB instead of SVLTE?

 

Fun times. :)

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Remember when the iPhone was the only Sprint LTE smartphone to work through CSFB instead of SVLTE?

 

Fun times. :)

Is this true? Are iphone 5s users facing same LTE issues as triband phones?

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Is this true? Are iphone 5s users facing same LTE issues as triband phones?

Not that anyone on here has seen.

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Has anyone figured out the LTE preference on the iPhone 5s or 5c?  I can't seem to find it in the phone.

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Has anyone figured out the LTE preference on the iPhone 5s or 5c? I can't seem to find it in the phone.

what preference? The one in Settings, Cellular? You can enable / disable LTE there. Not sure what else you're referring to.

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what preference? The one in Settings, Cellular? You can enable / disable LTE there. Not sure what else you're referring to.

Band preference 25 v 26

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Band preference 25 v 26

you cannot toggle this. It's baked into the PRL I believe. It prefers band 25 and will fall back to 26 if not available.

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you cannot toggle this. It's baked into the PRL I believe. It prefers band 25 and will fall back to 26 if not available.

 

The PRL has nothing to do with LTE.  PRL is only used for CDMA 1x and 3G.

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The PRL has nothing to do with LTE. PRL is only used for CDMA 1x and 3G.

The only thing that would enable/disable LTE radios in the iPhone would be an ota carrier settings update, right?

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The only thing that would enable/disable LTE radios in the iPhone would be an ota carrier settings update, right?

 

Not familiar with the iPhone but the way you do it on the LG and Samsung phones is through the dialer code ##DATA# (##3282#) to enable/disable the LTE bands.  Not sure if Apple has dialer codes and if it does its probably some obscure dialer code.  I am probably not the best person to answer this question since I don't know what Apple has done in the past.  I would like to know so that I can help friends out who have the Sprint iPhone.

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The only thing that would enable/disable LTE radios in the iPhone would be an ota carrier settings update, right?

 

Not familiar with the iPhone but the way you do it on the LG and Samsung phones is through the dialer code ##DATA# (##3282#) to enable/disable the LTE bands.  Not sure if Apple has dialer codes and if it does its probably some obscure dialer code.  I am probably not the best person to answer this question since I don't know what Apple has done in the past.  I would like to know so that I can help friends out who have the Sprint iPhone.

 

As far as we know, there is no known dialer code to change LTE band priority on the iPhone. We only have access to the Field Test. I wish there was a way to force Band 26 instead of Band 25.

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As far as we know, there is no known dialer code to change LTE band priority on the iPhone. We only have access to the Field Test. I wish there was a way to force Band 26 instead of Band 25.

We also don't know if band 26 is unlocked and ready to connect to the first tower it can when 26 rolls out. With all these tri-band issues customers are seeing, the dual-band functionality of the iPhone is often overlooked. Hopefully, it's not another "we might unlock bands 26/41 early 2014 via software" issue that Sprint is telling the g2/nexus 5 folks.

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From what I can tell, there isn't much, if any, band 26 LTE in the wild currently. I wouldn't worry until it starts becoming readily available. For all anyone knows,  the iPhone will connect easily to it and stay there as needed.

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Sensorly posted recently saying signal strength was blocked. To be honest I don't see it happening any time soon it is just one of those things that comes with phone "x".

Lol . I was talking about the phones themselves. Apple would simply need to release a software update that allowed mapping. It would probably take less than a week for them to do that but thats all up to them.

 

 

Ive advised those guys previously to go ahead and submit for review with mapping of signal strength, then when the rejection comes open an appeal and explain their case.

 

Believe it or not, Apple doesn't enjoy rejecting apps. They want to make sure that a) they aren't prevented from making changes due to unauthorized API usage - see the lengths Microsoft has to go to cover for badly written third party apps. B) make sure users don't ever have to worry about installing apps - no Trojan apps sending premium SMS messages, key logging, ruining the battery, etc.

 

If you can make a case that your app should be allowed they will often approve it.

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Ive advised those guys previously to go ahead and submit for review with mapping of signal strength, then when the rejection comes open an appeal and explain their case.

Does Apple & or the developers even read the reviews. I feel like im expressing myself about the app & no one is paying attention or cares. If they are reading the reviews then they sure take their sweet time fixing the app. YouTube for ex. has 3 stars on the App Store & yet all the updates they release never addresses the issues & or complaints that us customers have about the app. Whenever I get an update from YouTube it's usually "speed improvements/bug improvements that caused certain people issues with logging in" *thats just an example* but you get the point.

 

 

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A review for Sensorly that definitely should be read by Apple Posted Image

 

 

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