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New Sprint Plans...Unlimited, My Way, My All-In

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The current plans aren't going away, and there have been no announcements of any kind to that matter.

 

If you ask me, these plans are there so that they have a VZW-aike plan, so that people coming from other carriers can easily compare side-by-side. 

 

Lastly, while I'm not a mod, I definitely find it disturbing the amount of near-rant angry behavior in this thread. Sure, I understand anger over price increases (even though these aren't official yet, aren't mandatory, etc.), but some posts have had a serious "world is ending, bail Sprint now!!!!11" tone to them...

 

Reminds you of other sites no?

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I heard AIO has good coverage ;) Which city are you in? I wanna check the planned NV sites.

 

How does AIO coverage help Sprint customers?

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How does AIO coverage help Sprint customers?

You said you might switch cause of the lower roaming limit.

Who else has reasonable prices and awesome coverage?

$55 - 2GB and no overage charges.

 

It's disappointing that new Sprint plan doesn't have a "throttled after limit is reached" but instead charges overage $15/GB . . . just like the duopoly.

 

The consumer-friendly thing to do is to offer an option like TMO: throttling or you can pay for more full speed data.

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You said you might switch cause of the lower roaming limit. Who else has reasonable prices and awesome coverage?

 

Never said that.  No one does.

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How is everyone getting all these discounts? If I were to say to Sprint,"I'll sign up if you give me a 20% discount", would they do it? Don't see why not if so many other people have discounts.

Some employers offer a sprint discount and so do credit unions. Thats all that I know but I'm sure there are more.

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Looked carefully at Cspire today. There, I could get 2 lines with unlimited everything for $150. The rub is the 3rd line... no easy way to add just a voice line in an unlimited data family setup. Could get $20 cheaper by limiting the streaming video to 30 minutes. They were my only non duopoly option.

 

So for now, im going to use and enjoy my phone and the features I enjoy. If I cross a path with sprint where they reach out and tell me ive roamed too much or start throttling me terribly, I will reassess my options. Theres no reason to look any harder at these plans or worry. The growth or lack thereof is going to regulate what sprint will offer.

 

Sent from my Note II. Its so big.

 

 

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This sort of thing was inevitable, but it would be a better situation for new customers if NV were finished first.

 

What really worries me is the video throttling. I sometimes watch a show on Netflix while sitting at the dog park. Sure, I could watch the dogs the whole time, but they lack imagination and things get pretty repetitive. Anyways, 1mbps isn't even at the recommended bandwidth for broadband from Netflix. 0.5mbps is the minimum, and 3mbps is required for DVD quality. I realize that I could use a VPN to get around this, but not everyone has access to one. Isn't 1mbps just a bit low for an arbitrary throttling speed for video?

 

Another question is will they throttle video when a phone is being used as a hotspot?

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 Could get $20 cheaper by limiting the streaming video to 30 minutes. 

 

Sent from my Note II. Its so big.

 

Use a VPN and they won't be able to detect you're streaming video.

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This sort of thing was inevitable, but it would be a better situation for new customers if NV were finished first.

 

What really worries me is the video throttling. I sometimes watch a show on Netflix while sitting at the dog park. Sure, I could watch the dogs the whole time, but they lack imagination and things get pretty repetitive. Anyways, 1mbps isn't even at the recommended bandwidth for broadband from Netflix. 0.5mbps is the minimum, and 3mbps is required for DVD quality. I realize that I could use a VPN to get around this, but not everyone has access to one. Isn't 1mbps just a bit low for an arbitrary throttling speed for video?

 

Another question is will they throttle video when a phone is being used as a hotspot?

Would you really notice the difference at 1 mbps. I used to have a 700 kbps connection at home and I was able to stream Netflix with no problem. In fact before Netflix started limiting how many devices could stream at once, I used to stream three devices at a time on a 2mbps connection without an issue.

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Isn't 1mbps just a bit low for an arbitrary throttling speed for video?

 

We're talking about video on a phone screen: unless you have a 1080p screen, you won't hit the 1mbps in the first place, I think.

 

 

I realize that I could use a VPN to get around this, but not everyone has access to one

 

 

 

 

You can get one for ?$10? per month. Consider it part of your cost to have un-throttled video on the Sprint network.

 

 

 

Another question is will they throttle video when a phone is being used as a hotspot?

 

 

 

 

 

Likely not since that data is not unlimited so Sprint would want you to have full HD 1080p video so you can use it up faster.

 

 

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This sort of thing was inevitable, but it would be a better situation for new customers if NV were finished first.

 

What really worries me is the video throttling. I sometimes watch a show on Netflix while sitting at the dog park. Sure, I could watch the dogs the whole time, but they lack imagination and things get pretty repetitive. Anyways, 1mbps isn't even at the recommended bandwidth for broadband from Netflix. 0.5mbps is the minimum, and 3mbps is required for DVD quality. I realize that I could use a VPN to get around this, but not everyone has access to one. Isn't 1mbps just a bit low for an arbitrary throttling speed for video?

 

Another question is will they throttle video when a phone is being used as a hotspot?

I am pretty sure that is referring to streaming to your TV, and not a mobile device.

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This sort of thing was inevitable, but it would be a better situation for new customers if NV were finished first.

 

What really worries me is the video throttling. I sometimes watch a show on Netflix while sitting at the dog park. Sure, I could watch the dogs the whole time, but they lack imagination and things get pretty repetitive. Anyways, 1mbps isn't even at the recommended bandwidth for broadband from Netflix. 0.5mbps is the minimum, and 3mbps is required for DVD quality. I realize that I could use a VPN to get around this, but not everyone has access to one. Isn't 1mbps just a bit low for an arbitrary throttling speed for video?

 

Another question is will they throttle video when a phone is being used as a hotspot?

This doesn't affect you or you streaming unless you switch to the new plan.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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Reminds you of other sites no?

 

Not at all. I haven't read any other Sprint forums.

 

I heard AIO has good coverage ;) Which city are you in? I wanna check the planned NV sites.

To paraphrase Rob, anyone who gives AT&T money is a colossal fool, or seriously uninformed.

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Not at all. I haven't read any other Sprint forums.

 

To paraphrase Rob, anyone who gives AT&T money is a colossal fool, or seriously uninformed.

People want the best deal and the best network. Sprint is free to supply both.

 

I'm very informed. I get that there is a reason why duopoly exists but at the end of the month, it's my total expenses that matters. Am I supposed to add an item "Sprint goodwill" as an income line? Sprint has daddy Soft-bucks now. No more excuses. In 1 year when it's time for me to choose TMO or Sprint or AIO, I will choose best deal and best network for my 99% of the time. When I go to Florida, I'll dig out my iphone VZW and add page plus cellular 2-week plan for the ride down there.

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While I'm trying not to knee jerk at the new plans, I do find them interesting. My opinion is they'll start with these and ride them out for 6-9 months, and eventually mothball the Everything plans and force people into them, possibly this time next year. I also don't think Softbank had input on these like some have said. The timing doesn't line up.

 

With my contract coming up in Feb., and with just getting a new phone and all other lines in contracts until 2015, I have time. I'm giving Sprint time to further flush out NV (MI has seen a lot of love since the beginning of the year), and wait until we have actual reports of pricing and increases (4 lines here, but may drop to two soon) to compare apples to apples. These plans certainly line up better with the VZW and ATT offerings as of late, but don't offer any incentives that truly jump out on paper (at least not to me).

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This doesn't affect you or you streaming unless you switch to the new plan.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

Right, but I switched to T-Mo pre-paid until NV is rolled out because 3G in the "Research Triangle" (that's for you, danielholt) was not really usable. That means when I go back to Sprint, this will be my only option.

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Very interesting thread and it's amusing to see the panic of many.  Sprint has not typically forced people to move to new plans for some time after removing old plans and I'm not sure why many assume it will be different this time.  Additionally as long as both the base price and data package are discountable my bill would basically not change (single line.)  The only thing I would lose (if eventually forced to switch) is 200mb of roaming which is not an issue since I leave data roaming disabled unless I really need it.

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Very interesting thread and it's amusing to see the panic of many.  Sprint has not typically forced people to move to new plans for some time after removing old plans and I'm not sure why many assume it will be different this time.  Additionally as long as both the base price and data package are discountable my bill would basically not change (single line.)  The only thing I would lose (if eventually forced to switch) is 200mb of roaming which is not an issue since I leave data roaming disabled unless I really need it.

The base price is not discountable only the data package is

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Unless I missed something late in this thread that appeared to still be disputed but honestly I don't really care because I doubt Sprint will be forcing anyone to switch for awhile.

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Unless I missed something late in this thread that appeared to still be disputed but honestly I don't really care because I doubt Sprint will be forcing anyone to switch for awhile.

Before they revealed this new plan, I'm sure many said the same thing about introducing a more expensive - in some cases - plan with NV still 1 year away from completion.

 

Greed causes people to do things they don't normally do.

 

To whom would you switch if Sprint pulls a Verizon and takes away your subsidy unless you switch to a new plan when upgrading?

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Unless I missed something late in this thread that appeared to still be disputed but honestly I don't really care because I doubt Sprint will be forcing anyone to switch for awhile.

 

For current subscribers they'll be able to keep existing plan but to attract new subscribers, they may be forced into new plan and Sprint will have a hard time competing.  Sprint should not rollout this new plan until LTE coverage is mostly complete and 800Mhz is more prevalent.   They may be making a serious timing error here.

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To paraphrase Rob, anyone who gives AT&T money is a colossal fool, or seriously uninformed.

 

After the VZW-SpectrumCo-Cox transaction with Big Cable that sticks a fork in wired broadband competition across much of the country, VZ/VZW has become just as much public enemy #1 as has AT&T.  But too many members around here also use VZW for various reasons, so I have to bite my tongue.

 

AJ

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For some reason I am not able to quote.

 

@maximus1987 Chances are I would switch to a prepaid provider, most likely Virgin or Boost.  It would be tough losing access to the latest phones but I'd get over it.  Sprint's native coverage in it's current form has me covered 99% of the time, I can't say the same for T-Mobile and I have avoided both VZW and AT&T due to the cost for single line subscribers.

 

@TyrellCorpse I totally agree with what you're saying.

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After the VZW-SpectrumCo-Cox transaction with Big Cable that sticks a fork in wired broadband competition across much of the country, VZ/VZW has become just as much public enemy #1 as has AT&T. But too many members around here also use VZW for various reasons, so I have to bite my tongue.

 

AJ

Do you think Google Fiber will meaningfully affect competition?

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Two things that nobody has mentioned. The first is these new plans delete(or roll in) the premium data fee. So that major point of contention will not exist with these plans. The second is it possible that Sprint has decided that they are losing money on lines 3-5 of a family plan? While some will say  that is being short sighted as they may lose all five lines instead of the unprofitable ones(and I agree)I think it should still be considered. Remember, Sprint had no problem getting rid of its "problem customers".

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