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New Sprint Plans...Unlimited, My Way, My All-In

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So for new customers, will this plan be the only option?  Sprint should wait for 800Mhz LTE rollout before getting rid of the other plans.

 Other plans are still available: Top menu bar - > shop -> plans -> individual plans.

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Great links. I love how the WSJ calls it a price drop. And the Android Police were very pragmatic and stuck to the points. To think the S4GRU members were the ones who jumped to conclusions and the sky was falling first. More plans and more choices are a good thing. And these plans are a price drop to millions. Good reporting.

 

Robert

 

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So for new customers, will this plan be the only option? Sprint should wait for 800Mhz LTE rollout before getting rid of the other plans.

Never has Sprint nor any leaked info said that new customers had to choose these plans. Currently these are just additional plans.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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The new plans seem mostly similar to Sprint as You Go. Unlimited talk and text and data for less. 100 MB data and 400 mins roaming limit. No unlimited guarantee and slightly worse handset selection (but you don't have to pay full price) though. I can live with that.

Edited by linhpham2

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Never has Sprint nor any leaked info said that new customers had to choose these plans. Currently these are just additional plans.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

The plans go into effect tomorrow so we'll see whether the old plans remain an option. Logic would dictate that new customers will not be given existing plans as an option.  All of the documentation released states that these plans are beneficial to new customers and existing customers who choose to switch to these new plans.

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The plans go into effect tomorrow so we'll see whether the old plans remain an option. Logic would dictate that new customers will not be given existing plans as an option. All of the documentation released states that these plans are beneficial to new customers and existing customers who choose to switch to these new plans.

So you think new customers will only be able to select the new plans? Even though nothing has been said about that from any official or even leaked info. Interesting.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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I am of the opinion that Softy doesn't even WANT more than 5x5 600 nationwide. Thoughts?

 

Interesting opinion. Why or how have you come to be of that opinion?

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So you think new customers will only be able to select the new plans? Even though nothing has been said about that from any official or even leaked info. Interesting.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

It's a perfectly logical assumption from reading the press release and the FAQ that was linked.  The language refers to new customers and existing customers who switch.  Plus, history of wireless companies tells us that when new plans are introduced they're done because the company wants you to be on them. They are designed to generate more revenue for the Company. You start by making new customers or existing customers activating new lines sign up for the new more profitable plans then slowly push the existing base off the old plans and onto the new ones as their contracts come up for renewal.  Just because they haven't come clean and said it today doesn't mean they won't say it tomorrow. Probably with very little fanfare.  

 

In summation: I'll believe when I don't see it.

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Now this very well could have more to do with the shut down of Nextel but I thought this new addition to the Sprint T&C was interesting given the new plans, and the problems old SERO plans have raised in the past. 

 

 

"We may change any part of the Agreement at any time, including, but not limited to, rates, charges, how we calculate charges, discounts, coverage, technologies used to provide services, or your terms of Service. If you lose your eligibility for a particular rate plan or if a particular rate plan is no longer supported or available, we may change your rate plan to one for which you qualify. We will provide you notice of material changes—and we may provide you notice of non-material changes—in a manner consistent with this Agreement (see "Providing Notice To Each Other Under The Agreement" section). If a change we make to the Agreement is material and has a material adverse effect on Services under your Term Commitment, you may terminate each line of Service materially adversely affected without incurring an Early Termination Fee only if: (a) call us within 30 days after the effective date of the change; (B) you specifically advise us that you wish to cancel Services because of a material change to the Agreement that we have made; and © we fail to negate the change after you notify us of your objection to it. If you do not notify us and cancel Service within 30 days of the change, an Early Termination Fee will apply if you terminate Services before the end of any applicable Term Commitment."

 

Doesn't this essentially give them the right to kick Everything Data customers off their plans at anytime they feel like it in the future by calling it unsupported?

 

This was the old T&C

 

"We may change any part of the Agreement at any time, including, but not limited to, rates, charges, how we calculate charges, discounts, coverage, technologies used to provide services, or your terms of Service. We will provide you notice of material changes—and we may provide you notice of non-material changes—in a manner consistent with this Agreement (see "Providing Notice To Each Other Under The Agreement" section). If a change we make to the Agreement is material and has a material adverse effect on Services under your Term Commitment, you may terminate each line of Service materially affected without incurring an Early Termination Fee only if you: (a) call us within 30 days after the effective date of the change; and (B) specifically advise us that you wish to cancel Services because of a material change to the Agreement that we have made. If you do not cancel Service within 30 days of the change, an Early Termination Fee will apply if you terminate Services before the end of any applicable Term Commitment."

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It's a perfectly logical assumption from reading the press release and the FAQ that was linked. The language refers to new customers and existing customers who switch. Plus, history of wireless companies tells us that when new plans are introduced they're done because the company wants you to be on them. They are designed to generate more revenue for the Company. You start by making new customers or existing customers activating new lines sign up for the new more profitable plans then slowly push the existing base off the old plans and onto the new ones as their contracts come up for renewal. Just because they haven't come clean and said it today doesn't mean they won't say it tomorrow. Probably with very little fanfare.

 

In summation: I'll believe when I don't see it.

Couldn't it be just as logical to assume that the language is for new customers and existing customer who choose them? I'm certainly not willing to put my reputation on the line to make a definite call on this one. But I just want to continually make the point these are additional plans until someone can confirm otherwise. Even the AndroidPolice article calls them additional plans. So I will disclaim every post says these are mandatory selections until that is more than feelings.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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It's a perfectly logical assumption from reading the press release and the FAQ that was linked. The language refers to new customers and existing customers who switch. Plus, history of wireless companies tells us that when new plans are introduced they're done because the company wants you to be on them. They are designed to generate more revenue for the Company. You start by making new customers or existing customers activating new lines sign up for the new more profitable plans then slowly push the existing base off the old plans and onto the new ones as their contracts come up for renewal. Just because they haven't come clean and said it today doesn't mean they won't say it tomorrow. Probably with very little fanfare.

 

In summation: I'll believe when I don't see it.

Based on the FAQ it is clear that there will still be a choice between plans:

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ImageUploadedByTapatalk1373575803.871831.jpg

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The plans go into effect tomorrow so we'll see whether the old plans remain an option. Logic would dictate that new customers will not be given existing plans as an option.  All of the documentation released states that these plans are beneficial to new customers and existing customers who choose to switch to these new plans.

 

Only thing that has me thinking -- is ATT *STILL* offers the "older" style plans in addition to their mobile share... so I am going to presume at this time that Sprint will market both plans in conjunction with each other for the foreseeable future.  When that changes, it will be a whole 'nother story...

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Based on the FAQ it is clear that there will still be a choice between plans:

{style_image_url}/attachicon.gif ImageUploadedByTapatalk1373575803.871831.jpg

Well, that answers the question for me! Thanks for posting it. I'm sure the detractors will have an explanation for that too.

 

Robert from Note 2 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

 

 

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It's a perfectly logical assumption from reading the press release and the FAQ that was linked. The language refers to new customers and existing customers who switch. Plus, history of wireless companies tells us that when new plans are introduced they're done because the company wants you to be on them. They are designed to generate more revenue for the Company. You start by making new customers or existing customers activating new lines sign up for the new more profitable plans then slowly push the existing base off the old plans and onto the new ones as their contracts come up for renewal. Just because they haven't come clean and said it today doesn't mean they won't say it tomorrow. Probably with very little fanfare.

 

In summation: I'll believe when I don't see it.

It really doesn't make sense. If sprint were going to only offer these plans to new customers they would have said so when they announce the plans like vzw did.

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Here's some analysis on my own lines if I were to switch based on what we know so far about the discounts (on data only on all lines).  This is for four lines, 3 smartphones and one feature phone.  My current discount is only for the first line and doesn't include the $10 smartphone charge:

   Current:

110 (First line)
- 27.50 (25% discount)
+ 10 (1st line data fee)
+ 20 (2nd line)
+ 20 (3rd line)
+ 10 (3rd line data fee)
+ 20 (4th line)
+10 (4th line data fee)
---------------------------
$172.50 

   New plans:

   50 (1st line)
+ 30 (1st line data fee)
-   7.50 (1st line 25% data discount)
+ 40 (2nd line)
+ 30 (3rd line)
+ 30 (3rd line data fee)
-    7.50 (3rd line 25% data discount)
+ 20 (4th line)
+ 30 (4th line data fee)
-    7.50 (4th line 25% data discount)
-----------------------------------------
$207.50 

 

 

So, I would end up paying $35/month more for the new plans not including taxes, fees, etc.  When I switch the fourth line over to a smartphone (most likely when a good tri-band phone comes out) it would cost me $47.50/month more on the new plans.

 

Glad they are keeping the old plans for now, otherwise it would be a 20-26% increase for me.

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Just got this from seeking alpha.

 

Sprint (S) overhauls its prices and provides lifetime unlimited voice/data guarantees just a day after the SoftBank (SFTBF.PK) merger closed. The carrier is offering smartphone users unlimited voice/text/data for $80/month for the first line on an account, with the price gradually dropping for lines 2-4. A $110/month plan that throws in 5GB of hotspot usage is also being rolled out. SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son has made it clear Sprint will compete aggressively on price against AT&T (T) and Verizon (VZ), who have been trying to migrate subs to costly shared data plans. Sprint's announcement shortly follows the launch of T-Mobile's

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So idk if I missed it in here but if you compare the new plans to the old Simply Everything plan they've gone way down.

 

Old: $410 for 4 lines

New: $260 for 4 lines

 

So while it's $50 more compared to the lowest minute allotment Everything Data…

 

Old: $210 for 4 lines

 

It's still substantionally reduced for unlimited everything (even if discounts are calculated differently) and seems like a good move to me. Considering unlimited talk & text are standard at AT&T, Verizon, and T-mobile now. And I often see comparisons between carriers use Sprint's Simply Everything rate so from a media standpoint this looks very good. The Verge is reporting that they've reduced rates, even if it's slightly higher than the old limited minute plans.

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On the landing page for the new plans, they plaster "283 million".

http://shop.sprint.com/mysprint/shop_landing.jsp?pagename=whysprint&plan=unlimited&ECID=vanity:unlimited

 

I know the mods don't "like to focus on POPs" but obviously Sprint does so it's a valid point to discuss.

Is the 283 million with roaming included? I'm guessing yes.

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I'd bet, they used to advertise 230 million covered on the Sprint network and 280 with roaming.

 

 

On the landing page for the new plans, they plaster "283 million".

http://shop.sprint.com/mysprint/shop_landing.jsp?pagename=whysprint&plan=unlimited&ECID=vanity:unlimited

 

I know the mods don't "like to focus on POPs" but obviously Sprint does so it's a valid point to discuss.

Is the 283 million with roaming included? I'm guessing yes.

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I'd bet, they used to advertise 230 million covered on the Sprint network and 280 with roaming.

 

That's bad. So that means you could be places where Verizon has coverage but roaming is disabled?

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I think you can roam on VZW anywhere you don't have Sprint coverage, and there isn't a higher prioritized roaming partner.

 

That's bad. So that means you could be places where Verizon has coverage but roaming is disabled?

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I think you can roam on VZW anywhere you don't have Sprint coverage, and there isn't a higher prioritized roaming partner.

 

Then it should be a lot higher than 283 million since Verizon covers 298 million with LTE (and probably more with voice).

 

Verizon’s 4G network now covers 298 million people and covers 95 percent of the U.S. population.

 

http://gigaom.com/2013/06/27/verizon-wraps-up-lte-rollout-plans-all-voip-phone-launch-for-late-2014/

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Them apparently not, if that's the case I wonder what specific areas Sprint customers are barred from VZW roaming in. I wonder if it could be VZW affiliate markets.

 

 

Then it should be a lot higher than 283 million since I know Verizon covers at least 295 million.

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Sprint should have waited until tri-band phones came out before announcing new plans.  Even if they entice some from ATT/VZW, they are going to get a rude awakening when finding out their new phone doesn't work on 800 or 2500 LTE coming within the next year.

 

Major timing error by Sprint.  Why did they have to rush out this plan now?  Tri-band phones are coming this fall.

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Sprint should have waited until tri-band phones came out before announcing new plans.  Even if they entice some from ATT/VZW, they are going to get a rude awakening when finding out their new phone doesn't work on 800 or 2500 LTE coming within the next year.

 

Major timing error by Sprint.  Why did they have to rush out this plan now?  Tri-band phones are coming this fall.

 

How do you know triband phones are coming this fall?

And why is it a rude awakening? Is Sprint lying to them regarding the bands the phones work on?

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