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Huawei introduces microwave's second generation of devices at MWC


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Today [Huawei] announced the launch of the RTN FO (Full-outdoor) microwave product, the industry’s first ultra broadband FO microwave with a capacity of up to 2 Gbit/s, at the Mobile World Congress 2012 in Barcelona.

 

The second generation of microwave devices will provide smaller, lighter, faster and more energy efficient devices to provide site to site backhaul. Hopefully they can get these to market before NV is done. Huawei is really building themselves a name in the tech section. I am actually excited to see their flagship line of phones when they come to market. Initially I thought they might just be another wanna-be producing shoddy knock-offs. Their design for at least one of their phones is eerily similar to the SGSII, but at least it's not just like the iPhone, or they would already be in court.

 

http://www.lightreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=218300

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As a company they rake in billions a year. The quad core processor in thier upcoming phones is thier own.

They label it now as the fastest. Really looking forward to some 3rd party benchmarks for it.

 

Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk

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The second generation of microwave devices will provide smaller, lighter, faster and more energy efficient devices to provide site to site backhaul. Hopefully they can get these to market before NV is done. Huawei is really building themselves a name in the tech section. I am actually excited to see their flagship line of phones when they come to market. Initially I thought they might just be another wanna-be producing shoddy knock-offs. Their design for at least one of their phones is eerily similar to the SGSII, but at least it's not just like the iPhone, or they would already be in court.

 

http://www.lightread...p?doc_id=218300

 

are you kidding Huawei pretty much stole everything from various telecoms across the globe.

 

moto, nortel, who knows who else.

 

why do you think sprint was not allowed to use huawei equipment for network vision?

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are you kidding Huawei pretty much stole everything from various telecoms across the globe.

 

moto, nortel, who knows who else.

 

why do you think sprint was not allowed to use huawei equipment for network vision?

 

Where do you get your facts for this assertion?

 

1. Motorola claimed that Huawei infringed on their patents, but in the end, Motorola came to an agreement with Huawei.

http://www.reuters.c...E73C2V820110413

 

2. Sprint blocked Huawei (and ZTE) from bidding on network vision contracts

because there were Department of Defense concerns that they could be subject to "significant influence by the Chinese military which may create an opportunity for manipulation of switches, routers, or software embedded in American telecommunications network so that communications can be disrupted, intercepted, tampered with, or purposely misrouted."

Report: Sprint excludes Huawei, ZTE from network project over security concerns - FierceWireless http://www.fiercewir...5#ixzz1o4fCIZJG

 

3.

Today, however, Huawei is building some of the best, most innovative, and fastest equipment in the industry.

http://tech.fortune....uawei-so-scary/

 

It all boils down to, the DOD is afraid of Chinese spying using the network equipment that would have covered vast areas of the USA if Huawei would have been awarded a contract.

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Sadly, the Chinese gov't has a long history of telling state owned companies to steal US and other intellectual property.

 

I'll dig up a few articles later...

 

This one should get you started:

http://www.bloomberg...-cyber-war.html

 

“What has been happening over the course of the last five years is that China -- let’s call it for what it is -- has been hacking its way into every corporation it can find listed in Dun & Bradstreet,” said Richard Clarke, former special adviser on cybersecurity to U.S. President George W. Bush, at an October conference on network security. “Every corporation in the U.S., every corporation in Asia, every corporation in Germany. And using a vacuum cleaner to suck data out in terabytes and petabytes. I don’t think you can overstate the damage to this country that has already been done.”

 

 

 

“We’re talking about stealing entire industries,” he said. “This may be the biggest transfer of wealth in a short period of time that the world has ever seen.”

 

I am not one that is about crazy theories or grasping at straws... but there is a long list of articles that allow one to connect the dots.

 

I will spend some time and draw up a long timeline of news articles. Did you read about the nortel theft? That's insane that Chinese hackers had full access to nortel networks for 10 years. If you feel like Huawei had nothing to do with that... I'll see if I can dig up some articles to convince you otherwise.

Edited by irev210
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Well, now that I read that article, I feel like Chinese hackers are downloading everything off my hard drive.

 

Companies have been reverse engineering their competitors products for years, this hacking of source documents just speeds up the process. In no way am I saying it is right, but it is the shady part of business. Even US companies do it. Whether or not Huawei engaged in the hacking or use of the intellectual property, they are innovating beyond what others have done.

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Well, now that I read that article, I feel like Chinese hackers are downloading everything off my hard drive.

 

Companies have been reverse engineering their competitors products for years, this hacking of source documents just speeds up the process. In no way am I saying it is right, but it is the shady part of business. Even US companies do it. Whether or not Huawei engaged in the hacking or use of the intellectual property, they are innovating beyond what others have done.

 

Sure, companies have. This is totally different. This is the Chinese government that is the driving force ehind this.

 

Huawei is not innovating. They stole a crap-ton of IP and are now putting out a new product based off stolen IP. When you introduce a new product, it needs to be viable (at a price that makes sense for both the buyer and the seller). When development costs are not "real" you can essentially do things that other companies cant (you can't compete with a company that illegally steals billions in tech). Just because Huawei is releasing it, doesn't mean no other company didn't actually create it. Maybe they did and said "hey this would be too costly for anyone to buy". Huawei comes along and steals it and says "hey we can build this for a lot less because we have no development costs and people will buy it".

 

FBI Traces Trail of Spy Ring to China

 

ORINDA, Calif.—Federal agents were searching Walter and Christina Liew's home here last July for evidence of corporate espionage when a safe deposit box key caught their attention. They asked Ms. Liew if she knew where the bank was located. Her husband told her in Chinese to say she didn't, according to an account later given by federal prosecutors.

An agent who understood Chinese picked up on the exchange and followed Ms. Liew as she left the house, drove to an Oakland bank and tried to empty a safe deposit box the key fit. The box, according to prosecutors, contained documents outlining a more than decadelong plot to steal DuPont Co. corporate secrets and sell them to a Chinese government-owned company.

 

http://online.wsj.co...d=ITP_pageone_0

 

 

Again, I am not one to argue about strange theories but there really is a pretty long list of lawsuits, news articles, etc that clearly define the Chinese Gov'ts roll of stealing IP from anyone and everyone.

 

The fact that you say that's ok so they can "innovate" because "everyone else" does it is pretty sad. I am all for companies being competitive and what not... but not this.

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Sure, companies have. This is totally different. This is the Chinese government that is the driving force ehind this.

 

Huawei is not innovating. They stole a crap-ton of IP and are now putting out a new product based off stolen IP. When you introduce a new product, it needs to be viable (at a price that makes sense for both the buyer and the seller). When development costs are not "real" you can essentially do things that other companies cant (you can't compete with a company that illegally steals billions in tech). Just because Huawei is releasing it, doesn't mean no other company didn't actually create it. Maybe they did and said "hey this would be too costly for anyone to buy". Huawei comes along and steals it and says "hey we can build this for a lot less because we have no development costs and people will buy it".

 

FBI Traces Trail of Spy Ring to China

 

ORINDA, Calif.—Federal agents were searching Walter and Christina Liew's home here last July for evidence of corporate espionage when a safe deposit box key caught their attention. They asked Ms. Liew if she knew where the bank was located. Her husband told her in Chinese to say she didn't, according to an account later given by federal prosecutors.

An agent who understood Chinese picked up on the exchange and followed Ms. Liew as she left the house, drove to an Oakland bank and tried to empty a safe deposit box the key fit. The box, according to prosecutors, contained documents outlining a more than decadelong plot to steal DuPont Co. corporate secrets and sell them to a Chinese government-owned company.

 

http://online.wsj.co...d=ITP_pageone_0

 

Again, I am not one to argue about strange theories but there really is a pretty long list of lawsuits, news articles, etc that clearly define the Chinese Gov'ts roll of stealing IP from anyone and everyone.

 

The fact that you say that's ok so they can "innovate" because "everyone else" does it is pretty sad. I am all for companies being competitive and what not... but not this.

 

I'm not justifying them stealing technology from other companies, and I don't think it is right. What I was saying is that it is a part of business. As per the research that I have done, there is not a single shred of evidence that supports your claim that Huawei has stolen. Furthermore, you have not presented anything supporting the claim that Huawei has engaged in stealing technology. Just because they are a Chinese company, and the chinese have engaged in corperate espionage, doesn't mean that they are involved. At this point, without any facts, your assertions are nothing more than slander.

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I'm not justifying them stealing technology from other companies, and I don't think it is right. What I was saying is that it is a part of business. As per the research that I have done, there is not a single shred of evidence that supports your claim that Huawei has stolen. Furthermore, you have not presented anything supporting the claim that Huawei has engaged in stealing technology. Just because they are a Chinese company, and the chinese have engaged in corperate espionage, doesn't mean that they are involved. At this point, without any facts, your assertions are nothing more than slander.

 

I only posted the most recent article because it showed up in the paper today. What it DOES support, once again, is that the Chinese government has a long history of supporting/engaging in corporate espionage for the benefit of state-owned or state-supported enterprises in China. It just proves my point that the government in China actively engages in corporate espionage. As Huawei is a state-supported enterprise, I think it is perfectly valid to compare them.

 

Here are some more direct examples:

 

Cisco Systems filed an IP infringement claim in 2003 against Huawei Technologies (a powerful Chinese MNC that produces telecommunications and networking equipment) for copying patented Cisco technologies, user manuals, and the source code used for Huawei’s counterfeit routers. In a 2005 interview with PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Warren Heit, a partner at White & Case, states that display cases at some of Huawei’s offices contained ‘perfect’ knock-offs of Cisco telecom and Polycom equipment.

 

Huawei’s business model, for example, is partly based on selling counterfeit products in developing countries with poor IP protection. As Heit suggests: “Huawei is saying to itself… ‘I am going to knock (Cisco) products off and to the extent the IP law allows me to practice in these areas, I’m going to go there…Cisco, maybe you can have the U.S., but I’ll take you everywhere you haven’t gone.’”

 

A Huawei employee illegally took photos of Fujitsu circuit boards at Supercomm in 2003; Business Week speculated that the employee may have also collected proprietary information from AT&T, Cisco, Lucent, Nortel, and Tellabs.

http://www.hsaj.org/?fullarticle=5.1.7

 

 

On July 21, the general counsel of Fujitsu Network Communications sent a letter to Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei, informing him that a Huawei employee had been caught allegedly trying to filch information on rivals' products at a recent trade show.

On June 23, Yi Bin Zhu was discovered after hours at the SuperComm show in Fujitsu's booth removing the casing from a $1 million piece of networking gear and taking photos of the circuit boards inside. According to a July 21 letter sent by Melanie Scofield, the Fujitsu unit's chief counsel, a security guard was summoned and confiscated the photo card in Zhu's digital camera along with a notebook containing notes and diagrams of other suppliers' gear.

 

 

On Saturday, The Australian newspaper reported that the country's national security ser-vice is investigating claims that the Australian branch of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei employs technicians in Australia with direct links to the People's Liberation Army and the Chinese government.

 

Their claims include that the Chinese government controls Huawei's operations and that the privately owned company is involved in cyber espionage against Australian interests, ac-cording to the paper.

http://english.peopl...83/6751276.html

 

But one telecom industry veteran said that around 2004, it was clear to many that Huawei was copying Nortel’s telecom hardware, and even its instruction manuals.

http://m.theglobeand...?service=mobile

 

 

As reported by The Wall Street Journal this month, hackers had free rein inside Nortel's network for more than a decade before the company went bankrupt in 2009.

 

Still, neither the expert nor Mr. Shields was able to establish a direct link between the hackers and their mysterious benefactors. Mr. Shields' conviction that the Chinese government was involved on behalf of Huawei remains circumstantial at best: The Shenzhen based company had surpassed US$100-million in annual sales to international markets in 2000, the year many Nortel historians mark as the start of the former Canadian corporate champion's fall from grace. Huawei enjoyed rapid global growth from that point onward.

 

Armed with nearly two decades doing security for the now-defunct Canadian company whose technology still powers telecommunications networks around the world, he had spent a day just before Christmas 2008 digging through the Web browsing history of then CEO Mike Zafirovski, known to colleagues as 'Mike Z'. Mr. Shields was convinced there were criminals working on behalf of China's Huawei Technologies Co. accessing the CEO's files, but his hunch hadn't been enough for his immediate bosses to grant him direct access to the top man's PC.

http://www.canada.co...77-85427e0b97c2

 

 

 

Using seven passwords stolen from top Nortel executives, including the chief executive, the hackers—who appeared to be working in China—penetrated Nortel's computers at least as far back as 2000 and over the years downloaded technical papers, research-and-development reports, business plans, employee emails and other documents, according to Brian Shields, a former 19-year Nortel veteran who led an internal investigation.

 

The hackers also hid spying software so deeply within some employees' computers that it took investigators years to realize the pervasiveness of the problem, according to Mr. Shields and Nortel documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. They "had access to everything," Mr. Shields said of the hackers. "They had plenty of time. All they had to do was figure out what they wanted."

 

http://online.wsj.co...KEYWORDS=nortel

 

I can go on and on... but I think this makes my point. While there is no "smoking gun" I think there is a long trial here.

 

1) Huawei copied Cisco and Nortel equipment

2) Chinese hackers had access to Cisco and Nortel computer systems

3) ZTE and Huawei are the two major state-sponsored telecoms in China that would benefit from hackers stealing IP from various telecoms across the world.

4) It is very well documented that no major (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint) telecom in the USA can use Huawei

5) There are multiple reports that confirm that while Huawei is "100% employee owned" in reality, it is a state-sponsored enterprise

 

 

Smoking gun? Not exactly. Enough stuff out there to say that Huawei actively goes out and steals IP, yes.

 

Do all companies do that? No. Do some? Yes. Are they told to by their respective governments? Typically no.

Edited by irev210
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Speaking to the general environment, here is another good recent article. Amazing that this could happen.

 

 

China Corporate Espionage Boom Knocks Wind Out of U.S. Companies

2012-03-15 21:00:00.12 GMT

 

 

By Michael A. Riley and Ashlee Vance

March 16 (Bloomberg) -- Last June, three men squeezed inside a wind turbine in China’s Gobi Desert. They were employees of American Superconductor Corp., a maker of computer systems that serve as the electronic brains of the device. From time to time, AMSC workers are required to head out to a wind farm in some desolate location -- that’s where the wind usually is -- to check on the equipment, do maintenance, make repairs, and keep the customers happy.

On this occasion, the AMSC technicians were investigating a malfunction. They entered the cylindrical main shaft of the turbine, harnessed themselves to a ladder, and climbed 230 feet in darkness up to the nacelle, an overpacked compartment that holds the machinery used to convert the rotation of the blades into electricity. Devens, Massachusetts-based AMSC had been using the turbine, manufactured by the company’s largest customer, China’s Sinovel Wind Group Co., to test a new version of its control system software.

 

Article Link: http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-03-15/china-corporate-espionage-boom-knocks-wind-out-of-u-dot-s-dot-companies

Edited by S4GRU
Edited to comply with S4GRU Article Quoting Guidelines
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Please follow the posting rules that are found here http://s4gru.com/index.php?/page/index.html/_/site-guidelines-rules/guidelines-about-posting-articles-from-outside-websites-r26 when using the intellectual property of other websites. By not quoting them, you are just as bad as the Chinese hackers/corperate spies... J/K :lol:

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Please follow the posting rules that are found here http://s4gru.com/ind...de-websites-r26 when using the intellectual property of other websites. By not quoting them, you are just as bad as the Chinese hackers/corperate spies... J/K :lol:

Speaking to the general environment, here is another good recent article. Amazing that this could happen.

 

China Corporate Espionage Boom Knocks Wind Out of U.S. Companies

2012-03-15 21:00:00.12 GMT

 

Thanks Scott. Thank you irev210 for your comment. Please revise per our quoting guidelines when you get a chance.

 

Robert

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It won't let me edit it - can you delete it?

 

I posted the link :-D

 

I edited for you. I forgot that you can only edit for thirty minutes after a post.

 

Robert

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