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DSL line x 2 -- options with two lines of DSL


jonathanm1978
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So..with only 6meg down, 512k up...I'm tired of my daughters iPhone pictures/videos causing me problems when she takes them...seems like the iPhone I added last week was the tipping point between being too much for my connection to handle...

Every time she takes photos and videos and they start uploading or syncing...or whatever...I start having problems with upload speed.

 

I have:

 

2 PS3 consoles (which a second line will solve the problem of not being able to get nat type 2. I already get NAT 2 on mine, but can't expose the IP to the 2nd PS3 and get NAT 2).

 

2 SGS3 that sync with ...all that junk

1 iphone

Vonage

Sprint Airave

1 Smart TV

Roku

On-Demand satellite

IP Sec camera w/sound

 

and the computers that access the connection at any given time...usually 2-3 computer connections.

 

With all that stuff, I'm starting to have problems with upload, and even noticing ping times that really suck, especially since I spend LOTS of time on multiplayer games, like Battlefield 3 and CoD BO2...

 

 

Question I'm pondering is what can I do with two DSL lines, since I already placed the order...

I'm thinking about just cancelling the order but I really need to do something ...if I stop or unplug things, then I can't use my services like Vonage and Sprint Airave...the IP cam has been unplugged for a couple of weeks because it just can't do anything with my upload speed being so low...

 

I'm hoping adding a 2nd 6meg download/512k upload will alleviate some of the pressure on just one DSL line.

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AT&T. I got a bit smart with the rep yesterday and told the person I was placing the order with that "AT&T had no competition in my area, so there isn't any reason for them to invest into putting U-Verse in here...but hey, there's a reason why the United States ranks 9th in broadband speeds across the world..."...

 

They didn't mention this when I talked to the rep...for an hour that it took to get this order placed....I was just ready to get off the phone (non-American and kept saying "it will not be many longer, I promise, thank you for patience"

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On the phone with tech now about it, and they are also going to try and expedite the order for the 2nd DSL line...she's saying she doesn't believe they can do the bonded pair deal...

 

updated:

 

They don't do bonded pairing on DSL...appears to be mostly for U-verse installations where they do that, if it's one of those uverse-over-copper deals, where the DSLAM is fiber-fed but copper to the home.

 

She said I can go into the modem and see what settings I can play with...

I have a large selection of routers as well, but I don't know that any of them, even the Buffalo w/DD-WRT pro and Ubiquiti router + Nanostation loco M2, have the ability to pair connections (once the PPPoE is done, obviously in the modem(s) separately)....

 

If anyone has any ideas, I'm willing to try what I can with the connection once it's up on the 2nd DSL line and see what I can come up with.

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I'm curious though, is there any other services available for you? The reason I ask is, unless you have another copper pair wiring, your bottleneck is still your wiring from DSLAM to prem. Is there WiMAX or something else available? (I doubt it, but have to ask anyway).

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No...nothing else avail.

 

I wish there was something...I literally can throw a rock and hit the DSLAM (or the hut that houses the DSLAM, ya know).

 

We used to call it the bellsouth hut...but it's where the fiber that comes under my driveway runs into...plus where the cell phone tower for AT&T (which is a mile up the road from me) is fed by fiber as well. I hope they upgrade this cell tower to 4G...because they'll have to change DSLAM equipment inside this hut if they do.

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I just re=read your post...

 

I actually am getting ANOTHER copper DSL line...just like having 2 phone lines with separate lines...I"m going to have two DSL lines with separate modems for each one. Two separate billable numbers...two separate syncs to the dslam...

 

I was just going to split things off and divide up the things I used for internet...vonage on one DSL line...Sprint airave on the other...one ps3 on 1st DSL line....2nd PS3 on second DSL line... etc, etc.

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I believe what you are looking for is called load balancing. Solutions do exist (software & hardware) but typically not very cheap. Not sure how much you want to spend. Google "load balancing DSL" and you'll get a bunch of different options.

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I just re=read your post...

 

I actually am getting ANOTHER copper DSL line...just like having 2 phone lines with separate lines...I"m going to have two DSL lines with separate modems for each one. Two separate billable numbers...two separate syncs to the dslam...

 

I was just going to split things off and divide up the things I used for internet...vonage on one DSL line...Sprint airave on the other...one ps3 on 1st DSL line....2nd PS3 on second DSL line... etc, etc.

 

Ahh, so you are getting them to run a new copper line to your prem, that's pretty cool man. Verizon here will only lay out fiber to prem, and if you're a current copper user, as soon as something goes wrong, they'll pull the copper and put in fiber and upgrade to "digital voice".

 

That's a smart idea, pricy, but smart, at least you'll have the load balanced between the equipment in the house. One idea is to make sure you use different SSIDs for the wireless access points, on unique channels.

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Ahh, so you are getting them to run a new copper line to your prem, that's pretty cool man. Verizon here will only lay out fiber to prem, and if you're a current copper user, as soon as something goes wrong, they'll pull the copper and put in fiber and upgrade to "digital voice".

 

That's a smart idea, pricy, but smart, at least you'll have the load balanced between the equipment in the house. One idea is to make sure you use different SSIDs for the wireless access points, on unique channels.

 

or only do wireless on one DSL line and leave the other for hard connections such as the AirRave, Vonage, a PS3, etc

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Ahh, so you are getting them to run a new copper line to your prem, that's pretty cool man. Verizon here will only lay out fiber to prem, and if you're a current copper user, as soon as something goes wrong, they'll pull the copper and put in fiber and upgrade to "digital voice".

 

That's a smart idea, pricy, but smart, at least you'll have the load balanced between the equipment in the house. One idea is to make sure you use different SSIDs for the wireless access points, on unique channels.

 

I'm sure he wishes that AT&T would just run fiber to his home rather than continuing with copper. Since FTTH would give him 50/25 for the price he's paying for unbonded 2x 6/512 now.

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I'm sure he wishes that AT&T would just run fiber to his home rather than continuing with copper. Since FTTH would give him 50/25 for the price he's paying for unbonded 2x 6/512 now.

 

One of the few times that I'm so grateful to be living in a FiOS deployed area. Fiber to Prem is awesome.

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You might want to look into Sharedband if you want a "bonded" connection; they set up a tunnel between your router and theirs, utilizing whatever connectivity you have to build a bigger pipe. So in your case you'd get close to 12/1 (well, 10/800 since if I remember correctly AT&T doesn't overprovision to counter ATM overhead), rather than two 6/512 lines, for $25 more per month.

 

On the other hand, you may want to keep traffic segregated; use a wired router for one connection (both PS3s, the Airave, Vonage, Roku, satellite, maybe the camera) and a wireless router for the other (everything else). What you want is to keep heavy, sporadic uploads from one segment from killing consistent, light uploads/downloads from the other, and in order to do this by just throwing bandwidth at the problem you need a lot more upload bandwidth (I still have this issue with my 5 Mbps up connection).

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Our solution was to change to cable modem service. Apparently, DSL upload speeds are just not going to accommodate a single large upload along with any other devices, even if all those other devices are predominantly doing downloads. When we were on DSL (6/512), if there was any kind of uploading going on, all the other devices were out of luck. At the time, we had one smart TV, four cell phones, five laptops, a desktop, two DirecTV DVRs, and a couple of Blu-ray players. The only way it was even tolerable was to use QoS in the D-Link router to limit upload bandwidth. When we changed to cable modem service, we went from 512K up to 5M, and since their recent increase in speed, it's now 10M. In addition to the above, we now also have a security system, two wireless thermostats, a Roku, and a second desktop. Even after adding all these devices, streaming and all other access is fine. Our roommate took a job recently that requires cable modem service, interestingly enough, since it is working for a "call center" and everything is over the broadband connection. They actually tell prospective employees that DSL is not supported.

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You need a proper QOS implementation on a router running Tomato or something like that. Works great once you get it tuned and working.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

I don't have much exp with that, yet...but I tinkered with it in DD-WRT when my wife wanted me to stop my daughter from staying up all night on her iPod sending texts from that textfree app...

So I put a timer on the MAC of the ipod, shutting down i'net after 7:30pm, and not before 9:00am...

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Before you look into bonding the lines, you need to make sure that the DSLAM that you are connected to is capable of the combined throughput of both lines.

Because you can get 6 Mbps on a line, means that your DSLAM is most likely fibre fed.

 

I have two DSL lines, Century(un)Link doesn't offer bonded DSL in my area, so I have to use a third party ISP.

The ISP needs to offer MLPPP.

 

I have used Sharedband.com , it works, not as good as MLPPP.

 

To use MLPPP you need a good router, I don't know of any commercial offered ones that support it. I have tried several versions of OpenWRT/TomatoMLPPP and pfsense. Pfsense works, always works, the best choice.

 

If you need any help configuring both lines with pfsense, let me know.

 

If you don't want bonding (combining both lines into a single connection, combined 2 x 6 Mbps = 12 Mbps), look into load balancing which a lot of higher priced routers offer. To get all your devices and connections could be a challenge unless you are pretty handy with network rules. Pfsense can do load balancing too.

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pfsense is great.. but it does have it's issue.

 

I've been working with my Dad's Non-profit. It's a heritage farm north of Charlotte in AT&T land. They currently have two DSL lines and looking at adding a 3rd. Every time we talk to AT&T regarding the DSL line, they push UVerse. I'd love for them to have UVerse, We've setup an install to do this, but each time the line guys come out, they start laughing. The line report 2+ miles from the pedestal to the shelf. It's physically 1.5 miles distance... They say they can't touch it if it's more than 5k feet. Time Warner is out of the question, it's at last several hundred feet off the road in any direction, and I don't think it comes with-in a mile of their "house"

 

This sharedband thing looks quite interesting. They got a letter from AT&T trying to convert them to uVerse, and they "guarantee" it's available... might try it again, but at this point it's a waste of time.

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would pci create a bottleneck in a scenario with one on-board and two nic cards?

 

PCI? Maybe, though if I remember correctly we're talking about 100 MB/s there or better, so not really.

 

PCIe? Nope, and any new machine is going to have PCIe slots, rather than PCI ones.

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My current desktop has 1 pci-e x16 and 1 pci-e x4. I think. I built it two years ago, 6 core amd with 8gb of ddr3. One slot is long and has my video card, one is really short, has nothing. Then I have an empty pci slot. I would need a pci-e nic, then a pci nic.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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