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What will Sprint do with Clearwire now that it owns it?

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So now that Sprint purchased all remaining shares of Clearwire what is going to happen? Will they re-purpose the towers into its own LTE network? Or are they going to keep it a separate network and just leave it as is/add more towers?

 

Now that WiMax will be a type of LTE i hope they just use all these towers on Sprints network and start filling out the roll out!

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So now that Sprint purchased all remaining shares of Clearwire what is going to happen? Will they re-purpose the towers into its own LTE network? Or are they going to keep it a separate network and just leave it as is/add more towers?

 

Now that WiMax will be a type of LTE i hope they just use all these towers on Sprints network and start filling out the roll out!

 

That's not approved yet by the FCC or shareholders, so for now... they're kind of stuck. Then account the whole Dish drama in.

 

That has to be resolved. Once it is, the plan is to go to TD-LTE.

 

http://en.wikipedia....-Term_Evolution

 

But yes, they can be gangbusters fast once they start pushing out 2.6 TD-LTE.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51kWQTyWqRA

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That's not approved yet by the FCC or shareholders, so for now... they're kind of stuck. Then account the whole Dish drama in.

 

That has to be resolved. Once it is, the plan is to go to TD-LTE.

 

http://en.wikipedia....-Term_Evolution

 

But yes, they can be gangbusters fast once they start pushing out 2.6 TD-LTE.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51kWQTyWqRA

 

Ah i thought it was a sure thing.

 

So with the TD-LTE would that be part of the NV 4G or will it be a fallback network? (if it does go through).

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Ah i thought it was a sure thing.

 

So with the TD-LTE would that be part of the NV 4G or will it be a fallback network? (if it does go through).

 

It's going to be deployed first where Sprint needs the capacity. Now for a lot of places, Sprint will be fine with SMR and PCS G LTE. For the places that it won't be, that's where TD-LTE comes in. TD-LTE can offer speeds VZW and AT&T won't be able to match because there's so much TD-LTE bandwidth to throw in. This is a big competitive advantage for Sprint once they get it going.

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My guess is that Sprint will stop Clearwire LTE deployment on CLWR sites. Sprint will only add TD-LTE on Network Vision sites, as needed for capacity. After 2014, Sprint would then start dismantling the CLWR network.

 

That's what I would do. Sprint will need to get rid of all those redundant CLWR sites to reduce operational expenses. And CLWR doesn't really offer any additional coverage to Sprint, especially after Sprint deploys 800. CLWR just has denser site spacing within the Sprint footprint.

 

Expect CLWR sites to go away after the WiMax commitment disappears. Of course, this is all dependent on whether Sprint ends up with CLWR and DISH does not end up with Sprint or Clearwire. And these are just my educated guesses.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

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There are a couple places that Sprint could build a new site that clearwire already covers with a really good signal, like Lindsay, CA. Sprint is the only service that doesn't work there. I take my iSpot down so I have data to use iMessage, while Sprint roams on Cricket, with totally unusable data.

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I'd like to see Sprint keep the Clear sites where needed, in some highly urban areas, additional site density could be a great asset. Make them full build or non-800 sites.

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I think Sprint should decommission them and replace them with Network Vision sites. The whole point of Network Vision is the simplify Sprint's network architecture, and this would just complicate things. Not to mention, I believe that historically Clearwire hasn't done a great job placing WiMAX sites in appropriate locations, anyway.

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I agree there is a clear wire site in a cemetery near me

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I agree there is a clear wire site in a cemetery near me

 

Sounds like an appropriate location for Wimax  :P

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Lol whys that? Is it because its dying

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Lol whys that? Is it because its dying

Exactly the reason. Lol :rofl:

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Exactly the reason. Lol :rof


We found a quite suitable replacement.

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We found a quite suitable replacement.

 

Are you using LTE-TD? Or that hybrid tech you referred to? I would be fascinated to know. Or maybe it's one of your own creations?

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This is a bit off-topic, but what is going to happen to the dozens, if not hundreds, of Wimax networks around the world? Everyone is announcing that Wimax is dead, but it seems to me in some applications it will continue (maybe not as much in the 'developed world') as CDMA has, as it is cheaper and currently seems much more scalable. 

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Are you using LTE-TD? Or that hybrid tech you referred to? I would be fascinated to know. Or maybe it's one of your own creations?

Its most like LTE-A. TDD

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This is a bit off-topic, but what is going to happen to the dozens, if not hundreds, of Wimax networks around the world? Everyone is announcing that Wimax is dead, but it seems to me in some applications it will continue (maybe not as much in the 'developed world') as CDMA has, as it is cheaper and currently seems much more scalable. 

 

I think WiMAX will be around for a while, unless equipment starts failing. There is a HUGE embedded install base (laptops with dual WiFi/WiMAX chips, etc.) that can use the network.

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R.I.P. Clearwire. You will be missed by a few, but your spectrum will hopefully be put to good use.

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Sprint welcomes all CLEAR customers who want to activate service on the Sprint network. Sprint offers unlimited data plans for phones and competitively-priced data plans for mobile broadband cards, laptops, tablets and other devices.

 

Not surprising they have not incorporated clears unlimited plans into sprint, but Lame none the less.

 

They certainly are not competitive with clears $50 unlimited plan, that is for sure.

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Not surprising they have not incorporated clears unlimited plans into sprint, but Lame none the less.

 

They certainly are not competitive with clears $50 unlimited plan, that is for sure.

 

Not lame, smart.  Do you want *lame* people using the 20 MHz TDD carrier as a home broadband replacement and sucking up much of the capacity?

 

AJ

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Uh they already do, so yes?

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Uh they already do, so yes?

That was fine when you had a limited amount of mobile customers on that bandwidth. Now that the companies future has a significant connection to a positive mobile experience through the same bandwidth, its a totally different story.

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I am using Clear everyday and I am really happy with their service and I would be real sad to see them go. Sprint should allow current Sprint customers to maintain their accounts on a future 2.5/2.6GHz LTE network only since they have the capacity. Clear had only about 1.3 million subs and not everyone is leaching huge amounts of data.

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