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Sprint losing more pseudo native coverage [Nex-Tech, United Wireless, PTCI]?


Rawvega
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I can't find any official documentation yet. However, feeling a bit masochistic, I visited SU for the first time in a long time and found this post from a Sprint employee:

http://www.sprintusers.com/forum/showpost.php?p=2734546&postcount=1

 

From the description of the areas that supposedly will lose native coverage, I can only guess that it's Sprint's agreement with Nex-Tech Wireless that's coming to an end for whatever reason. I don't know the number of POPs in the affected areas, but it's probably on the low side. Still, if this indeed comes to fruition, this will be the latest in a string of native coverage reductions that is really starting to make Sprint look bad.

 

First there was the loss of native coverage provided by Alltel. Not Sprint's fault that Alltel got bought out, but still...

 

sprint-roaming-changes-0111.jpg

 

Then there was the loss of native coverage provided by Pioneer after they decided to jump into bed with Verizon.

Sprint-voice-coverage-before-after-March-2012.jpg

Sprint-data-coverage-before-after-March-2012.jpg

 

Now Sprint may potentially be losing the native coverage provided by Nex-Tech. If true, this will be the third year in a row that Sprint's native coverage has shrunk. Regardless of the number of POPs covered in each of these coverage reductions, it just doesn't look good at all. Verizon is continually expanding their native presence, just this week with the Mohave Wireless purchase for example. At&t tries to do the same as evidenced by their recent purchase of the latest version of 'Alltel' from ATNI. Hell, if one believes the rabid t-mobile fanboys over on HoFo, even little magenta is doing some coverage expansion here and there. In the meantime, Sprint is seemingly going in the opposite direction.

 

I think it was a mistake not putting CDMA/LTE service in iDEN-only areas and I think allowing their native coverage map to continually contract is a mistake as well. I know that they're in the midst of Network Vision which is a strain on time and capital other resources, but come on...One can hope that once they've completed Network Vision on their remaining coverage that they will embark on some coverage expansion to make up some of what they've lost. That, and/or they buy their way into coverage like their two larger competitors are apt to do....

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Nextech should be begging to not only stay Sprints partner but strengthen that partnership with Network Vision. If I'm not mistaken Nextech has failed to secure devices that support their A-Block 700 spectrum for LTE.

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First, here is the relevant portion of the SprintUsers post:

 

Effective 6/14/13 parts of eastern Colorado and western Kansas. Including along some parts of i70, southwest Kansas and the Oklahoma panhandle will be consider as off network.

 

That does describe Nex-Tech, which covers the northern portion of western Kansas and the I-70 corridor in eastern Colorado. But it also seems to describe United Wireless, which covers the southern portion of western Kansas, and PTCI, which covers the Oklahoma Panhandle. All three are Sprint Rural Alliance partners -- and as it would seem unlikely that all three would decide to sever their agreements with Sprint at the same time -- this decision to stop providing pseudo native coverage quite likely could be a choice from Sprint's end.

 

As for not retaining iDEN only coverage, honestly, that is a red herring in this discussion. Nextel had zero coverage in any of these affected areas. So, from that perspective, nothing lost, nothing gained...

 

AJ

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Nextech should be begging to not only stay Sprints partner but strengthen that partnership with Network Vision. If I'm not mistaken Nextech has failed to secure devices that support their A-Block 700 spectrum for LTE.

 

If Nex-Tech is the only Sprint Rural Alliance partner affected (see my post above for the other two possibilities), then this move could make more sense, as Rickie has reported that Nex-Tech is expanding into Sprint native coverage along the I-135 corridor. That may have created a rift between the two carriers.

 

Also, yes, Nex-Tech does hold Lower 700 MHz A block spectrum. And that could be another source of tension, if Nex-Tech wants to go that route instead of utilizing Sprint's PCS 1900 MHz G block spectrum. As for devices, USCC has procured band 12 LTE handsets that should be fully compatible with Nex-Tech's network, too.

 

AJ

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Why doesn't Sprint just buy out NexTech post-SoftBank? It would make sense from my vantage. Sure they'd lose money in the beginning but gain in the future.

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Why doesn't Sprint just buy out NexTech post-SoftBank? It would make sense from my vantage. Sure they'd lose money in the beginning but gain in the future.

 

Per my understanding, Nex-Tech, United, and PTCI all emerged out of telephone co-ops. They would be seemingly foolish to sell off just their wireless divisions. So, Sprint might have to buy them in their entirety -- wireless, wireline, and broadband.

 

Not likely...

 

AJ

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Per my understanding, Nex-Tech, United, and PTCI all emerged out of telephone co-ops. They would be seemingly foolish to sell off just their wireless divisions. So, Sprint might have to buy them in their entirety -- wireless, wireline, and broadband.

 

Not likely...

 

AJ

 

AT&T bought the wireless arm of XIT, a smaller but similar entity to Nex-Tech etc. I wouldn't rule out a wireless buyout of the same sort, particularly since the sellers could then turn around and resell whoever they thought actually provided the best coverage in the region...and sell top-of-the-line phones on that carrier that they might not be able to get, or get cheaply, alone.

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Wow this is crazy. My dad lives in northwestern kansas in a town served by Nex-Tech. If it does happen to be Nex-Tech severing ties from Sprint, will Sprint let my dad out of contract?

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Wow this is crazy. My dad lives in northwestern kansas in a town served by Nex-Tech. If it does happen to be Nex-Tech severing ties from Sprint, will Sprint let my dad out of contract?

 

From what I remember Sprint has let people out of similar situations without penalty.

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Wow this is crazy. My dad lives in northwestern kansas in a town served by Nex-Tech. If it does happen to be Nex-Tech severing ties from Sprint, will Sprint let my dad out of contract?

 

Or actually Sprint will quit them after roaming too much.

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Wow this is crazy. My dad lives in northwestern kansas in a town served by Nex-Tech. If it does happen to be Nex-Tech severing ties from Sprint, will Sprint let my dad out of contract?

Or actually Sprint will quit them after roaming too much.

 

It sounds like you got a bit of a "Brokeback Mountain" situation...

 

 

In all seriousness, though, why is your dad a Sprint sub in the first place? In my opinion, that is inappropriate. Please support Nex-Tech, the local carrier that actually built out the network in your dad's county. Or, if you must go with a national carrier, have your dad sign up with VZW or AT&T, which did nothing to build out the area but instead bought out Alltel and RCC Unicel.

 

AJ

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In all seriousness, though, why is your dad a Sprint sub in the first place? In my opinion, that is inappropriate. Please support Nex-Tech, the local carrier that actually built out the network in your dad's county. Or, if you must go with a national carrier, have your dad sign up with VZW or AT&T, which did nothing to build out the area but instead bought out Alltel and RCC Unicel.

 

AJ

 

 

This filing details the agreement between Sprint and Nextech to build out certain areas, and a subsequent lease and sale of 10 MHz of spectrum to Nextech. This agreement was considered material by Alamosa Holdings and is public:

 

http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1120102/000095013606000449/file002.htm

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In all seriousness, though, why is your dad a Sprint sub in the first place? In my opinion, that is inappropriate. Please support Nex-Tech, the local carrier that actually built out the network in your dad's county. Or, if you must go with a national carrier, have your dad sign up with VZW or AT&T, which did nothing to build out the area but instead bought out Alltel and RCC Unicel.

 

AJ

He needed a cell phone, sprint showed coverage there so I added him to my account. Simple as that. I actually didn't really know much about Nex-Tech providing the native coverage for Sprint until joining S4GRU. His contract is up next January so if we do have to pay an ETF in June, it wont be too bad. Lesson learned I guess.

 

Verizon finally just got EVDO there so I guess if he has to get on with them so be it.

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Seriously, I'm the first to take a shot at Gary Forsee for buying Nextel instead of Alltel in this thread?

 

The interesting relevance to this thread that had not occurred to me previously is that Sprint's hands may have been tied by its agreements with Nex-Tech and United Wireless. Had Sprint acquired Alltel, it would have become a competitor to its Sprint Rural Alliance partners in western Kansas and, no doubt, lawsuits would have ensued, just as with its traditional affiliates -- Alamosa, iPCS, et al. -- following the Nextel merger.

 

AJ

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Seriously, I'm the first to take a shot at Gary Forsee for buying Nextel instead of Alltel in this thread? Step your game up guys. :P

 

I often fantasize about what life would be like if Sprint had bought Alltel. But for selfish reasons. ;)

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

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I would have loved it if Sprint had acquired both Alltel and USCC and a few other regionals. Then bid both in the AWS and 700MHz auctions.

 

BTW, AT&T has been busy lately acquiring the spectrum of Corr Wireless:

 

 

AT&T said would benefit Corr subscribers by giving them access to AT&T's nationwide, high-speed wireless network. The deal also involves 10 to 52 MHz of spectrum covering parts of Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. Specifically AT&T would acquire:

  • 25 MHz of cellular B Block spectrum in three counties,
  • 10 to 15 MHz of PCS spectrum in 25 counties,
  • and 12 MHz of Lower 700 MHz C Block spectrum in 58 counties

They also get 21,000 subscribers.

 

 

 

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Odd. Wonder if cspire is cleaning up its books and maximizing returns before it puts itself up for grabs? and what ever happened with cspire's federal anti trust suit against att and others? Perhaps this is evidence of friendly talks between att and cspire

http://www.cedmagazine.com/news/2012/06/at-t-rivals-square-off-on-interoperability

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I would have loved it if Sprint had acquired both Alltel and USCC and a few other regionals. Then bid both in the AWS and 700MHz auctions.

 

Meh, no thanks. That would have been a veritable "battle of the bands." And too many bands spoil the network.

 

AJ

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Meh, no thanks. That would have been a veritable "battle of the bands." And too many bands spoil the network.

 

AJ

 

I think some low band spectrum in border areas and SOLinc areas could be helpful but otherwise 800 SMR should be more than sufficient for coverage purposes. We have PCS and BRS for capacity.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I think some low band spectrum in border areas and SOLinc areas could be helpful but otherwise 800 SMR should be more than sufficient for coverage purposes. We have PCS and BRS for capacity.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

It would be sufficient if they actually put up sites utilizing it. So far, that is not happening.

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