Jump to content

T-Mobile LTE speed test on Note II, iPhone HTC One


kckid
 Share

Recommended Posts

Technobuffalo had 3 articles testing different phones on T-Mobiles LTE network.

 

Here is a summary of the speed differences:

 

iPhone - Download: 32.32Mbps Upload: 13.57Mbps

Note II - Download: 57.99Mbps Upload: 20.16Mbps

HTC ONE - Download: 27Mbps Upload: 11.52MBps

 

 

Why is a big difference between the HTC ONE and the Note II.?

I don't know how many test were run, and if these are averages, but it doesn't look good for HTC to be the slowest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speed is based on signal strength. Those numbers do not surprise me. The Note II has an amazing ability to snag and use distant LTE signals. The HTC One is very close to the EVO LTE and we all know the RF performance of that thing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speed is based on signal strength. Those numbers do not surprise me. The Note II has an amazing ability to snag and use distant LTE signals. The HTC One is very close to the EVO LTE and we all know the RF performance of that thing.

 

I thought the One had better RF numbers from the FCC docs?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought the One had better RF numbers from the FCC docs?

 

And according to the FCC the Note2 had some poor LTE numbers as well when actually during a short trip across riding across town with the EVO LTE, S3, and Note2 in hand I found those to be incorrect. The Note2 actually edged out ahead of the S3 on LTE coverage. I will withhold my EVO LTE comments to save it the embarrassment.. My credibility level of those numbers is very low at this point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not doubting the performance of the EVO. After using the S3 for the past week, the difference is incredible. I expected a little gain in performance, but the actual real world results have far exceeded my expectations.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not doubting the performance of the EVO. After using the S3 for the past week, the difference is incredible. I expected a little gain in performance, but the actual real world results have far exceeded my expectations.

 

And that's why I believe those numbers are like that as it is very close to the EVO in design.

 

Sent from my little Note2

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Were all of the tests run at the same time in the same market? If not, they are meaningless, as T-Mobile is deploying a mix of 5 MHz FDD and 10 MHz FDD. Honestly, the iPhone 5 and One results look like the former, while the Note 2 results look like the latter.

 

AJ

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Note 2 performed nearly identically to the GS3 on Sprint LTE in my performance testing, despite differing RF testing numbers. Where the Note really differed in my testing is it would find the signal sooner without toggling than the GS3.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Were all of the tests run at the same time in the same market? If not, they are meaningless, as T-Mobile is deploying a mix of 5 MHz FDD and 10 MHz FDD. Honestly, the iPhone 5 and One results look like the former, while the Note 2 results look like the latter.

 

AJ

 

You stole my thunder! I was going to say the same thing. I guess great minds think alike. But I suppose warped minds would think alike too. ;)

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Neal Gompa is a good guy, but he has published yet another T-Mobile love fest. One statement in particular is a head scratcher: "T-Mobile is launching the fastest LTE network seen to date."

 

http://www.extremetech.com/electronics/151758-t-mobile-usa-launches-lte-network-with-breathtaking-speeds

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this information come from the phones being at the same place at the same time, then I'm a little disappointed with the HTC ONE. You'd think HTC would try and make sure their phone wouldn't have the same EVO LTE problems... But we don't know what the real world testing tells us yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Note 2 performed nearly identically to the GS3 on Sprint LTE in my performance testing, despite differing RF testing numbers. Where the Note really differed in my testing is it would find the signal sooner without toggling than the GS3.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

 

Yes, I find the GS3 picks up an LTE signal much faster than the EVO did, and it's also much better with fringe signals. It will sometimes pick up an LTE signal while sitting at my desk at work, whereas the EVO couldn't get it even after cycling the radio. I did prefer the hardware and the screen of the EVO more, though. "IF" the HTC One can give similar RF performance to what I have been getting from the Samsung, I will likely get it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this information come from the phones being at the same place at the same time, then I'm a little disappointed with the HTC ONE. You'd think HTC would try and make sure their phone wouldn't have the same EVO LTE problems... But we don't know what the real world testing tells us yet.

 

If there is one thing we have proven with this site, it's that two devices sitting next to each other can perform wildly different without a device problem or defect.

 

It is very possible that the Note 2 was on a different channel/sector than the other devices. It could have been a wider channel or a less burdened channel. A lot more information is required to make any noteworthy observations.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 with Tapatalk HD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Neal Gompa is a good guy, but he has published yet another T-Mobile love fest. One statement in particular is a head scratcher: "T-Mobile is launching the fastest LTE network seen to date."

 

http://www.extremetech.com/electronics/151758-t-mobile-usa-launches-lte-network-with-breathtaking-speeds

 

AJ

 

I'm going to go out on a limb and say he's right but attach a very large caveat to it, which is that T-Mobile will have the fastest LTE network right now because it has the fewest LTE devices connecting to it. Now, if you look at it from that perspective, of course it makes sense.

 

Compare to Big Red (I know, I know, I'm not a fan of their business practices but they have a very solid LTE network). Big Red will be able to come out of the gates in NYC with 2x20 and similarly low numbers of devices connecting to it until the next iPhone comes out. Who's going to be the fastest in New York? Not T-Mobile.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first thought in looking at those speeds was were they in the same area or is it a 5x5 vs. a 10x10 area. Also, as stated the Note 2 is an RF beast. My wife has a Photon Q and besides one oddity when visiting a tower, I've always connected to LTE much earlier than her and held it much longer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first thought in looking at those speeds was were they in the same area or is it a 5x5 vs. a 10x10 area. Also, as stated the Note 2 is an RF beast. My wife has a Photon Q and besides one oddity when visiting a tower, I've always connected to LTE much earlier than her and held it much longer.

I believe that they were tested at the same location, the announcement of T-Mobile lte.

 

As I recall, the first T-Mobile LTE tests for the tech press in NYC about a week or two ago utilized the Note 2 on an isolated, private 10 MHz FDD LTE cell. But T-Mobile's actual macro network in NYC will be 5 MHz FDD LTE for the time being.

 

Now, I will not put any stakes on it, but I bet that the Note 2 metrics come from those aforementioned tests, while the iPhone 5 and One metrics come from the announcement, which was in NYC, correct?

 

AJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I recall, the first T-Mobile LTE tests for the tech press in NYC about a week or two ago utilized the Note 2 on an isolated, private 10 MHz FDD LTE cell. But T-Mobile's actual macro network in NYC will be 5 MHz FDD LTE for the time being.

 

Now, I will not put any stakes on it, but I bet that the Note 2 metrics come from those aforementioned tests, while the iPhone 5 and One metrics come from the announcement, which was in NYC, correct?

 

AJ

 

The announcement yesterday was in NY, yes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And according to the FCC the Note2 had some poor LTE numbers as well when actually during a short trip across riding across town with the EVO LTE, S3, and Note2 in hand I found those to be incorrect. The Note2 actually edged out ahead of the S3 on LTE coverage. I will withhold my EVO LTE comments to save it the embarrassment.. My credibility level of those numbers is very low at this point.

Yes. LOL. My mother had the note 2 and me the GS3. She always has more bars and where I have 0 bars of 4G, she has 3 lol. She usually test about 1mb faster on the download
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The more I look at 10x10 vs. 5x5 - the advantages of deploying a 10x10 carrier seem substantial.

 

In areas where you have poor coverage, it seems like the 10x10 carrier can offer a far better user experience than 5x5.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The more I look at 10x10 vs. 5x5 - the advantages of deploying a 10x10 carrier seem substantial.

 

In areas where you have poor coverage, it seems like the 10x10 carrier can offer a far better user experience than 5x5.

 

Eh, not really. In areas where a carrier has poor coverage, subs are going to be spending a lot of time off LTE and on whatever is the fallback to LTE. That is where T-Mobile's HSPA+ 21 or DC-HSPA+ 42 comes in as advantage -- even though the LTE/W-CDMA combo is a decidedly inefficient use of spectrum.

 

AJ

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eh, not really. In areas where a carrier has poor coverage, subs are going to be spending a lot of time off LTE and on whatever is the fallback to LTE. That is where T-Mobile's HSPA+ 21 or DC-HSPA+ 42 comes in as advantage -- even though the LTE/W-CDMA combo is a decidedly inefficient use of spectrum.

 

AJ

 

Probably has a lot to do with my crummy EVO 4G LTE handset but I spend a lot of time on 4G LTE with RSRP around -105dB to -115dB. While 3-5Mb isn't bad, I imagine it's only going to get worse once the network is loaded. Look at poor Verizon.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Technobuffalo had 3 articles testing different phones on T-Mobiles LTE network.

 

Here is a summary of the speed differences:

 

iPhone - Download: 32.32Mbps Upload: 13.57Mbps

Note II - Download: 57.99Mbps Upload: 20.16Mbps

HTC ONE - Download: 27Mbps Upload: 11.52MBps

 

 

Why is a big difference between the HTC ONE and the Note II.?

I don't know how many test were run, and if these are averages, but it doesn't look good for HTC to be the slowest.

 

It's really odd and I have no explanation but my guess is that, again T-Mobile had set up 2x10Mhz LTE in a controlled, indoor environment, and maybe that Note II was closer to the base station? Other than that, all three phones were tested in the same location in NYC which is BTW T-Mobile's 2x5Mhz market... And iPhone 5 btw is known for having pretty solid RF characteristics, so I'm puzzled.

 

Also, I'm kinda getting tired of all the tech writers that are getting paid to cover these events, and none of them ask these questions, or at least fire up FieldTest mode... I'm really fed up with the amount of irrelevant and false reports covered by mainstream sites like The Verge for example.

 

Gah... I'll just stop here :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

It's really odd and I have no explanation but my guess is that, again T-Mobile had set up 2x10Mhz LTE in a controlled, indoor environment, and maybe that Note II was closer to the base station? Other than that, all three phones were tested in the same location in NYC which is BTW T-Mobile's 2x5Mhz market... And iPhone 5 btw is known for having pretty solid RF characteristics, so I'm puzzled.

 

Also, I'm kinda getting tired of all the tech writers that are getting paid to cover these events, and none of them ask these questions, or at least fire up FieldTest mode... I'm really fed up with the amount of irrelevant and false reports covered by mainstream sites like The Verge for example.

 

Gah... I'll just stop here :(

 

I am going to get in touch with Chris Ziegler (the senior mobile editor at the Verge) about some of their articles. I think the people there need to go to wireless school. Learn the industry better. If I can do it, they can too.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • large.unreadcontent.png.6ef00db54e758d06

  • gallery_1_23_9202.png

  • Similar Content

    • By DaQue
      I have Sprint and still on the framily plan if you can believe that. I am thinking about the new SE because its cheap mostly.
      For now should I get a Sprint phone or the T-Mobile version and just run it on Sprint? Current coverage here is spotty. If I go to my favorite Taco Bell I get 2 bars of strength but I can't even use the app to order until I drive a block north. I worried about included bands working now and some becoming obsolete in the future.
    • By MacinJosh
      iPhone XS and XS Max are Apple's newest flagship phones, and the successors to Apple's 2017 iPhone X. They have the new A12 Bionic chip, improved cameras and faster FaceID, and come in a beautiful Gold Stainless Steel finish in addition to the Silver & Space Gray options. They are available in the same 5.8" Super Retina display as with the X, and the bigger 6.5" Super Retina. They are available in 64GB, 256GB, and 512GB configurations.
      Apple added Dual SIM technology to the 2018 iPhone's, with one physical SIM, and one eSIM. (eSIM feature not currently supported by Sprint, but is said to be coming later). These phones also feature IP68 water-resistance (iPhone X was IP67) which gives you protection in water for up to 30 minutes in up to 2m of water.
    • By Paynefanbro
      I recently went on an 8 day cruise from NYC to the Caribbean that stopped in Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. My first stop was Grand Turk and there I opted for the free roaming. My S9+ automatically connected to Flow's (Cable & Wireless) LTE network where I received speeds of around 120kbps on average with boosts of up to 150kbps. Something worth noting is that on speed tests, the server prefers to default to Sprint's Miami server as opposed to local servers. Speeds were more than adequate for any amount of web browsing and honestly felt much faster than in reality. It helps that using Chrome will save you data by not loading pictures on certain sites unless you click them.
      In Puerto Rico, I connected to Band 13 on the way into the port in San Juan but once I was in the city, my phone never left Band 41. While the phone was usable, speeds remained significantly lower than what I've come to expect from 3xCA in the mainland U.S. Data speeds peaked at around 25-30Mbos but on average were in the 5-10 Mbps range even on LTE+. Signal remained strong everywhere though. 
      Finally in the Dominican Republic, I entered in Amber Cover which is in Puerto Plata. My phone latched onto a weak Band 2 LTE signal in the port from Altice (called Orange Dominicana in SignalCheck). I had trouble loading pages though. Once off of the ship and out in the open, I had a much stronger signal which allowed me to browse the internet without a hitch. Because it was the last day of my trip, while at the beach I decided to purchase the 24 hour high speed pass for $5. My speeds went from 120kbps to 65Mbps in less than 5 seconds. In some areas speeds were slower, particularly at the port where it struggled to break 2Mbps. Now, back on the boat my phone is flipping between weak Band 4 LTE and overloaded Band 5 HSPA+ from Claro (called Verizon Dominicana in SignalCheck Pro). Here is the difference in speed from before and after purchasing the high speed pass. 
    • By S4GRU
      by Scott Johnson
      Sprint 4G Rollout Updates
      Friday, February 3, 2012 - 2:00 PM MST
       
      The iPhone is something many people see as a status symbol. Many who have never owned one, long for their upgrade date so they can go out and buy the "exclusive" iPhone that they have been denied access to for years. Even some who had the iPhone, and then switched carriers, long to repurchase another. Yes, the iPhone is a well made smartphone with access to a loaded app store, and has many desirable features. But is it really better than Windows Phone, Blackberry or Android models?
      When Apple entered into a contract with AT&T, they remanufactured the RAZR craze and how the artificial scarcity of the device created such huge demand. The RAZR was a good device, and you may argue it was well ahead of other phones at the time of its release, but the other manufacturers caught up quickly. Apple used a similar strategy and it has paid off immensely. The iPhone is now available on the top 3 carriers in the U.S., but is still seen as a status symbol in many circles. As if only a few people have access to it. One could make a strong argument that the Samsung Galaxy SII is a superior smartphone, but still many customers line up to get the iPhone instead, because their inner hoarder says they NEED it, and the products perceived coolness and limited availability only add to the whole experience.
      The concept of artificial scarcity is simple. You take a product that is plentifully available to manufacture in mass, but limit distribution to a limited time, limited area, or in the case of the iPhone, limited retail outlets.
      The strategy has worked perfect for Disney. Why let your movies make the gradual descent to the $3.99 Wal-Mart bargain bin? Just keep "taking them out of the vault" and offering them at full price for a few months every couple years and people pull their credit cards out to pay $17.99 for an 85 year old movie and thank Disney for "allowing" them the opportunity to purchase Snow White. Oh, and you get to be a part of a limited privileged club.
      Another notable example is McDonald's McRib. If it was on the menu full time, many people either wouldn't bother going to McDonalds or would order something else, but artificial scarcity commands us to rush in to McDonalds and get several McRibs at a time because we won't have another chance at it for another year. What do we end up with, besides a belly ache and a reason why we don't normally eat at McDonalds?
      We should be immune to this form of advertising by now, as we are constantly inundated with limited time availability and special edition products all around us. However it is still alive and well here on Planet Earth, because it still works. Big time.
      Can Apple keep the air of exclusivity over its iPhone as it continues to broaden its distribution? Or will smartphone buyers move on to other devices? Only time will tell. But many doubt that Apple will play its hand as well in an era post Steve Jobs.
       
       
       
      Photos Courtesy of iPhone5rumor.net
    • By S4GRU
      by Jeff Foster
      Sprint 4G Rollout Updates
      Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 7:46 PM MST
       
      Since last fall, there had been talk of a Samsung Galaxy Nexus launching on American carriers other than Big Red. Sprint has finally announced several weeks ago that it is the another vendor slated for release in the U.S. Suffice to say, many of us out there, especially those adverse to heading to Verizon and paying its premium prices, are excited about the impending release.
      The good news is that Google could be working on an updated version of the Galaxy Nexus. It has unofficially been dubbed the Galaxy Nexus Plus. There is much anticipation that it will be released before Sprint turns on LTE this summer. It’s not the first time an OEM has refreshed a device and re-released it to the market place, which works to our advantage. It’s rumored that the new Galaxy Nexus will have either a 1.5 or 1.8 GHz Texas Instrument OMAP4670 dual core processor. This would be a significant upgrade from the 1.2 GHz dual core processor found in the current Verizon version.
      We don’t know anything about official specs, but it’s also rumored to have an 8 MP camera. This is a noteworthy upgrade to the 5 MP shooter on the Verizon model (which has been lauded by many techies). We already know that the Sprint model will come installed with Google Wallet, per previous announcements. Some rumors also point to a beefier battery as well. The phone should have all the other features that’s on the current Galaxy Nexus, so now all we have to do is wait.
       
       
      Source: http://androidandme....era-on-the-way/
  • Posts

    • At least a few sites in STL are now at 100 MHz.
    • 100 MHz n41 is live in Austin and...Bentonville, Arkansas. Guessing this went live on Tuesday or Wednesday in Austin; network was acting a bit wonky on Tuesday. Noticed it yesterday, as I'm still a little too far away at home to catch n41. Peak speed in Bentonville 1/3 mi from the site was 675-700 Mbps down, 80-90 Mbps up, with the upload speed only possible with a 20 MHz B66 anchor...which seems congested at times. They also have 5 MHz B2 here as an anchor, which predictably leads to slow uploads. n71 is 15x15 here. Sprint B25 is two 5x5 channels. Weirdly, seems like I'm being routed through Nashville, so latency is rather high, and tethering performance is somehow quite poor...maybe it's due to congestion on the PCC meaning that the difference between on-phone and tethered priority is the difference between a usable connection and...not. Also, VZW (with the old Alltel SID for CDMA) is what you end up using inside the Crystal Bridges museum, though the area has WiFi so not the end of the world.
    • The Sprint site at 520/202 was decommissioned a few weeks ago. Everything was pulled off the pole. 
    • It looks like N5 supports 5, 10, 15, and 20 MHz channel widths. I wonder how long they'll wait before they make a change to be able to use more of that spectrum for N5. Possible options I see: Use 15x15 as B26/N5 using DSS (If thats an option, or would it have to match and be N26?) 5x5 as B5 LTE for older phones and that still leaves 5x5 for HSPA.  A more aggressive option would be to use 20x20 for N5 exclusively and 5x5 for HSPA. This still leaves 10x10 B12 and 10x10 B14 for older phones for low band. Hopefully they enable SA if they go this route. Since I believe you can't aggregate low band LTE with low band NR in most cases, phones using the N5 carrier would not be touching the B12 and B14 carriers. If they enable SA on the 20x20 N5 carrier it would also help free up their limited midband spectrum for older non-NR phones. That would also prevent falling back to LTE only inside a building just because the mid-band anchor band was too weak. In Daytona AT&T was broadcasting 5x5 B2, 10x10 B66, and 10x10 B30 and that was it for midband. 
    • I've found 2 decommissioned Sprint sites in Louisville, both were sites with both T-Mobile and Sprint. In both cases all Sprint tower equipment including the rack were removed. I haven't had time to dig through our permit site to see if I can find anything, but I'll be surprised if I do. 
  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...