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T-Mobile Announces HD Voice Calling available today


leozno1
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Nationwide? What exactly does that mean, that there are now two spots on separate ends of the US where, were two people to theoretically stand and call each other with the right equipment, you would be able to have an HD voice conversation? Sorry to be cynical about T-Mobile, but their coverage is so incredibly lacking in my experience....

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My guess is that HD voice is now supported on every tower that is LTE-ready/has PCS HSPA+. I'll see my T-Mo store manager friend tomorrow evening and will see if he can give me a demo (Austin has the PCS H+ overlay).

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Tmobile CEO giving the quote of the year.

 

"A 5-gigabyte, 10-device shared data plan, when Joe Schmoe Jr. starts to watch porn on his phone, isn't gonna work."

 

http://www.theverge....p-mocks-verizon

 

That CEO's comments were strange, calling ATT's network terrible. T-Mobile's network is tiny compared to theirs.

T-Mobile should spend more effort on expanding their network instead of updating sections of it from 2g to 3g to 4g to 5g, leaving most areas either in 0.00001g or no coverage. :lol:

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That CEO's comments were strange, calling ATT's network terrible. T-Mobile's network is tiny compared to theirs.

T-Mobile should spend more effort on expanding their network instead of updating sections of it from 2g to 3g to 4g to 5g, leaving most areas either in 0.00001g or no coverage. :lol:

 

Although T-Mobiles network is tiny, where you get connection, it is far superior to ATT. Data speeds are higher, voice calls are clearer and they don't drop as often (still drops but not literally every other call), and customer service is substantially better.

 

Their HSPA+42 setup is nothing to sneeze about either even though it's FauxG. You can easily match LTE speeds given the backhaul. In my area, their setup is as good as ATT LTE, VZ LTE, and Wimax 4g with speeds in the 10-20 mbps range on average.

 

Their biggest problem is the fact that only their current 3g/3.5 (4g) parts of their network is going to get any upgrades and the 2g (edge/gprs) areas are going to be left untouched. A very big problem once you get out of a metro area and into the rural countryside.

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Although T-Mobiles network is tiny, where you get connection, it is far superior to ATT. Data speeds are higher, voice calls are clearer and they don't drop as often (still drops but not literally every other call), and customer service is substantially better.

 

Their HSPA+42 setup is nothing to sneeze about either even though it's FauxG. You can easily match LTE speeds given the backhaul. In my area, their setup is as good as ATT LTE, VZ LTE, and Wimax 4g with speeds in the 10-20 mbps range on average.

 

Their biggest problem is the fact that only their current 3g/3.5 (4g) parts of their network is going to get any upgrades and the 2g (edge/gprs) areas are going to be left untouched. A very big problem once you get out of a metro area and into the rural countryside.

 

Close, but not quite right.

 

I live on Long Island and one of my lines is a Nexus 4 with T-mobile's $30 "internet only special" 100min/1000text/5GB pre-paid plan.

 

I average 16mbit down 4mbit up and my ping is between 40-80 whenever I test it.

 

The markets that T-mobile "faux-4G" is actually in, it works great.

 

They've also committed to converting every GPRS/EDGE only coverage area over to HSPA+ within the next year, part of the 1900mhz overhaul involves drastically increasing their overall coverage area.

Edited by gangrene
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Their network is indeed tiny with some odd tower location choices. Their maps are very exaggerated in some places but I will say what they are using to render their maps is very cool. They have recently been making islands of coverages in a very rural part of Louisiana but they still do not have all of the interstate system covered here. Missing a huge section of I-49. Odd priorities on where to add sites.

 

-- "Sensorly or it didn't happen!"

 

 

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Close, but not quite right.

 

I live on Long Island and one of my lines is a Nexus 4 with T-mobile's $30 "internet only special" 100min/1000text/5GB pre-paid plan.

 

I average 16mbit down 4mbit up and my ping is between 40-80 whenever I test it.

 

The markets that T-mobile "faux-4G" is actually in, it works great.

 

They've also committed to converting every GPRS/EDGE only coverage area over to HSPA+ within the next year, part of the 1900mhz overhaul involves drastically increasing their overall coverage area.

 

Credible source for this? I've only seen slides indicating that part of the network will be upgraded, not even the whole HSPA 1700 network will be touched.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Same here, worry less about LTE, more about making your whole network 3g.

 

This guy is just.... clownish.

He needs to stop bemoaning att....the failed merger got u 4 billion dollars , spectrum, and better roaming. Take the roaming away from your customers and see how they feel.

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I don't believe that Tmo is actively converting its EDGE coverage to anything. The remaining sites that are EDGE only are used to protect against roaming costs.

 

In all Tmo announcements I've read they really push their upcoming LTE network and talk about how it is going to be deployed over their existing HSPA+ footprint. Never talking about any expansion of HSPA+ or LTE beyond their existing footprints. My only complaint with Tmo is hitting a data wall at the city limits.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 on Tapatalk

 

 

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I don't believe that Tmo is actively converting its EDGE coverage to anything. The remaining sites that are EDGE only are used to protect against roaming costs.

 

T-Mobile is an odd duck. Some of its coverage choices make little sense. For example, in your neck of the woods, Robert, T-Mobile has recently extended W-CDMA only coverage to Roy, Mosquero, and Logan -- there is reportedly no native GSM underlying that footprint. On the other hand, T-Mobile has let languish its GSM only coverage along the I-25 and I-40 corridors. I do think that T-Mobile will work to upgrade as much GSM only coverage as it can, but that will be a lengthy process. Sprint will have deployed LTE on nearly every site, urban or rural, years before T-Mobile will have deployed even W-CDMA on nearly every site, urban or rural.

 

2mow51e.png

 

AJ

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They've also committed to converting every GPRS/EDGE only coverage area over to HSPA+ within the next year, part of the 1900mhz overhaul involves drastically increasing their overall coverage area.

 

Where did you hear this?

 

The feel I've gotten over the years is that anywhere without cheap backhaul and plenty of folks to use it may still retain T-Mobile service, but at GPRS/EDGE levels as a roaming charge abatement plan. This is the case in a number of areas where it would be better for T-Mobile customers if TMo turned the towers off and let them roam on AT&T, which tends to have 3G more often than not in those same areas.

 

Now there are some instances where T-Mobile can provide better voice service than AT&T even when their network is a generation behind. However if you think that Sprint's congested pre-NV 3G is bad, wait 'til you get a taste of T-Mobile GPRS or EDGE. It's not that they're congested. It's just that there's very little bandwidth available to start with on the airlink (and, okay, they're probably backhauled with a single T1 per site).

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I don't believe that Tmo is actively converting its EDGE coverage to anything. The remaining sites that are EDGE only are used to protect against roaming costs.

 

In all Tmo announcements I've read they really push their upcoming LTE network and talk about how it is going to be deployed over their existing HSPA+ footprint. Never talking about any expansion of HSPA+ or LTE beyond their existing footprints. My only complaint with Tmo is hitting a data wall at the city limits.

 

Robert via Nexus 7 on Tapatalk

 

 

Its so odd. Ive never come across a tmo user who was dissatisfied with hspa+ speeds. What does upgrading to LTE in the markets that already have hspa+ accomplish with customers? I understand the need to say "me too" , but thats about it. I guess this new ceo has studied all the metrics of what his target customer wants and believes their current high speed build out is it. Just means many of us are not their target. I wish I was though!

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Its so odd. Ive never come across a tmo user who was dissatisfied with hspa+ speeds. What does upgrading to LTE in the markets that already have hspa+ accomplish with customers? I understand the need to say "me too" , but thats about it. I guess this new ceo has studied all the metrics of what his target customer wants and believes their current high speed build out is it. Just means many of us are not their target. I wish I was though!

 

Marketing and, well, LTE will eventually replace their DC-HPSA+ network. T-Mobile has done a pretty good job of doing small incremental upgrades to their network (GSM only sites excluded).

 

 

I FINALLY get my Nexus 4 tomorrow (WOOHOO!!!!) so I can't wait to try out the 30 dollar prepaid plan.

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Their network is indeed tiny with some odd tower location choices. Their maps are very exaggerated in some places but I will say what they are using to render their maps is very cool. They have recently been making islands of coverages in a very rural part of Louisiana but they still do not have all of the interstate system covered here. Missing a huge section of I-49. Odd priorities on where to add sites.

 

The T-mobile maps are awesome. I am curious to see how exaggerated they are compared to sprint. Sprint says my area is well covered however I am lucky if I can even latch onto an EVDO channel.

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Although T-Mobiles network is tiny, where you get connection, it is far superior to ATT. Data speeds are higher, voice calls are clearer and they don't drop as often (still drops but not literally every other call), and customer service is substantially better.

 

T-Mobile is beyond pathetic in the big picture. Almost the entire State of Delaware is EDGE/GPRS with poor coverage.

Why not just pull out if your going to half bake something?

 

They are fine if you live in a major metro area and don't ever leave it.

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The T-mobile maps are awesome. I am curious to see how exaggerated they are compared to sprint. Sprint says my area is well covered however I am lucky if I can even latch onto an EVDO channel.

 

In my area, with the Nexus 4, I can only get HSPA/HSPA+ in the dark green (excellent), I can get a weak outdoor signal in the "very good" range. I do not get any 3G/4G in the satisfactory or good range at all. I don't know if it is a radio performance issue with the Nexus 4, or Tmo grossly overstates its 3G/4G coverage.

 

Robert

 

EDIT: Also, outside of Santa Fe, all the Northern New Mexico HSPA+ sites are 500kbps - 2Mbps. So they haven't upgraded the backhaul at these locations. I't s a pity that my airlink is so fast, but drops to a crawl when it hits the backhaul.

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In my area, with the Nexus 4, I can only get HSPA/HSPA+ in the dark green (excellent), I can get a weak outdoor signal in the "very good" range. I do not get any 3G/4G in the satisfactory or good range at all. I don't know if it is a radio performance issue with the Nexus 4, or Tmo grossly overstates its 3G/4G coverage.

 

Robert

 

This is very helpful. I'll know more tomorrow and report back! I've waited 2 months to get a nexus 4... very excited to give it a whirl. Curious to see how different it is vs. the optimus g.

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In my area, with the Nexus 4, I can only get HSPA/HSPA+ in the dark green (excellent), I can get a weak outdoor signal in the "very good" range. I do not get any 3G/4G in the satisfactory or good range at all. I don't know if it is a radio performance issue with the Nexus 4, or Tmo grossly overstates its 3G/4G coverage.

 

Robert

 

From how many people I've read complain about this I'd tend towards the latter. Must be quoting coverage based on a hotspot with a large antenna!

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Close, but not quite right.

 

I live on Long Island and one of my lines is a Nexus 4 with T-mobile's $30 "internet only special" 100min/1000text/5GB pre-paid plan.

 

I average 16mbit down 4mbit up and my ping is between 40-80 whenever I test it.

 

The markets that T-mobile "faux-4G" is actually in, it works great.

 

They've also committed to converting every GPRS/EDGE only coverage area over to HSPA+ within the next year, part of the 1900mhz overhaul involves drastically increasing their overall coverage area.

 

I was under the impression that they had NOT committed to the conversion of the entirety of their GPRS/EDGE only network, that they had in fact made the decision to focus only on areas that were already "3G/4G" to do the HSPA+ overlay and 1900 refarm, along with add LTE. Last I checked they had said they were leaving current GPRS/EDGE areas alone for now. Did they make a change in that decision?

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Its so odd. Ive never come across a tmo user who was dissatisfied with hspa+ speeds. What does upgrading to LTE in the markets that already have hspa+ accomplish with customers? I understand the need to say "me too" , but thats about it. I guess this new ceo has studied all the metrics of what his target customer wants and believes their current high speed build out is it. Just means many of us are not their target. I wish I was though!

 

I think it really is mostly just marketing. It also makes since now that they are going to be merging with MetroPCS and it acts as a common technology between the two carriers. Also, in the long term, LTE is more efficient in terms of spectrum usage, so it makes sense from that perspective as well.

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