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AT&T Receives Spectrum Approval


4GHoward
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I hope the government will put some milestone requirements on the Clearwire spectrum to make sure that Sprint uses it more than Clearwire did. I think it should be something similar to those imposed on Dish.

 

Why would you want this? All Clear spectrum will be deployed in areas already covered by Sprint LTE. There will be no coverage advantage to Sprint customers to impose a build out requirement. And Sprint will be deploying on their own anywhere it is needed for capacity.

 

Besides, the build out for this spectrum has already been achieved. Protection Sites are active meeting the FCC build out requirements. Clearwire isn't being purchased by a new company. An existing shareholder is increasing its shares and now has voting control. It will change nothing with the FCC and build out. The protection sites will likely never be upgraded to LTE any time soon either.

 

Robert

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It doesn't benefit any of us for Sprint or anyone else to be sitting on so much spectrum. In my opinion, Clearwire's usage requirements were set too low resulting in a very limited network. Sprint should either deploy in every market or sell those markets to a company that will provide coverage to more people. Protection sites should not count as an active deployment and the government should fix this loophole.

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Completely disagree, 2500 is small cell/high capacity relief spectrum anyway, not nationwide build-out spectrum.

 

What company do you think is going to buy the Clearwire spectrum at a fair price? No other company needs this capacity spectrum as much as Sprint. All the other nationwide providers have made other deals to ensure enough capacity for the next 5-10 years.

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Completely disagree, 2500 is small cell/high capacity relief spectrum anyway, not nationwide build-out spectrum.

 

What company do you think is going to buy the Clearwire spectrum at a fair price? No other company needs this capacity spectrum as much as Sprint. All the other nationwide providers have made other deals to ensure enough capacity for the next 5-10 years.

 

Clearwire tried to sell it and had no takers. That would tell you how desirable the spectrum is.

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Not sure if this was already discussed, but why not sell the Clearwire infrastructure to Dish?

 

I think it's a possibility. But if no spectrum goes with it, I'm not sure Dish would want it.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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I think it's a possibility. But if no spectrum goes with it, I'm not sure Dish would want it.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

Not is not for the spectrum, it's to make it easier for them get their network deployed on their own. Yes, Dish will have to get new equipment, but it does make the whole permitting & building process a lot easier. That, and Sprint will be able to offload those site leases. My only thing is how much will Sprint have to pay Dish to keep WiMAX running, since there's no way in hell Sprint would deploy brand-Spanking-new WiMAX equipment as part of NV.

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Not is not for the spectrum, it's to make it easier for them get their network deployed on their own. Yes, Dish will have to get new equipment, but it does make the whole permitting & building process a lot easier. That, and Sprint will be able to offload those site leases. My only thing is how much will Sprint have to pay Dish to keep WiMAX running, since there's no way in hell Sprint would deploy brand-Spanking-new WiMAX equipment as part of NV.

 

I don't think that DISH can deploy AWS-4/S-Band on Clearwire base stations, not to mention definitely not on the panels. They are not multi-modal. Many Clearwire sites do not have room for additional panels, as they are mounted directly to the monopole for each sector. It's a very hodge-podge network setup.

 

Clearwire cannot even deploy LTE on all their base stations/panels. Only the ones deployed since early 2010. The 2008-2009 WiMax sites need to be replaced in order just to accommodate TD-LTE 2600 on them. There is not much value to the current Clearwire network. It's Frankennetwork. It really is good for only WiMax on 2600 and some TD-LTE on 2600. Any further upgrade to add AWS-4/S-Band LTE is just not worth the cost and difficulty.

 

If DISH wants to go with an easy, fast and cheap route to deployment, Sprint network hosting is the only way to go. And SoftBank may not even want to do hosting deals. Sprint wanted to do it for money. SoftBank doesn't need the money.

 

Robert

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It doesn't benefit any of us for Sprint or anyone else to be sitting on so much spectrum. In my opinion, Clearwire's usage requirements were set too low resulting in a very limited network. Sprint should either deploy in every market or sell those markets to a company that will provide coverage to more people. Protection sites should not count as an active deployment and the government should fix this loophole.

 

RichardXy and all the others who feel spurned by WiMAX need to get over it, grow a pair, and stop making these kinds of pointless, bitter posts. You act as if Clearwire is just standing pat on all of this spectrum, while some angel is waiting in the wings to deploy if only it could gain access to the spectrum. Wrong. No other carrier wants the spectrum unless it can get it for pennies on the dollar. The FCC set reasonable, population based BTA construction requirements for BRS/EBS 2600 MHz spectrum, and Clearwire met those requirements. Anyone who thinks that Clearwire shoulda, coulda, woulda deployed WiMAX across the entire Sprint footprint is living in fantasy land and/or has little understanding of wireless propagation.

 

AJ

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RichardXy and all the others who feel spurned by WiMAX need to get over it, grow a pair, and stop making these kinds of pointless, bitter posts. You act as if Clearwire is just standing pat on all of this spectrum, while some angel is waiting in the wings to deploy if only it could gain access to the spectrum. Wrong. No other carrier wants the spectrum unless it can get it for pennies on the dollar. The FCC set reasonable, population based BTA construction requirements for BRS/EBS 2600 MHz spectrum, and Clearwire met those requirements. Anyone who thinks that Clearwire shoulda, coulda, woulda deployed WiMAX across the entire Sprint footprint is living in fantasy land and/or has little understanding of wireless propagation.

 

AJ

I totally disagree. While Clearwire may not be able to justify wimax in extremely rural areas, they could have justified full implementation in major markets like Phoenix, Detroit and San Diego. Instead of deploying protection sites in rural America, they should have returned those licenses to the government. There doesn't need to be an Angel in the wings to swoop in and use the spectrum. Surely, this 2600 MHz spectrum could be put to use by colleges, universities, local governments, or some other use. Just because no other cellco's want it does not mean that it's useless. I still believe the government should look into the 2600 MHz utilization as part of SoftBank, Sprint, Clear deal. If this happens maybe Sprint can get an even lower price.

 

 

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I totally disagree. While Clearwire may not be able to justify wimax in extremely rural areas, they could have justified full implementation in major markets like Phoenix, Detroit and San Diego. Instead of deploying protection sites in rural America, they should have returned those licenses to the government. There doesn't need to be an Angel in the wings to swoop in and use the spectrum. Surely, this 2600 MHz spectrum could be put to use by colleges, universities, local governments, or some other use. Just because no other cellco's want it does not mean that it's useless. I still believe the government should look into the 2600 MHz utilization as part of SoftBank, Sprint, Clear deal. If this happens maybe Sprint can get an even lower price.

 

Colleges and universities did not have any use for it and are leasing it to Clearwire. I don't know how many times we can say this. This spectrum is really a mismatch for the demographic makeup of the US, except for hotspot duty. Now, it is perfectly suited for fixed/nomadic broadband, but you have to account for backhaul costs, if you are going to use it like that. In fact, I had Sprint Broadband for both my office and home at one time, a year or two before cable internet.

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I don't think that DISH can deploy AWS-4/S-Band on Clearwire base stations, not to mention definitely not on the panels. They are not multi-modal. Many Clearwire sites do not have room for additional panels, as they are mounted directly to the monopole for each sector. It's a very hodge-podge network setup.

 

Clearwire cannot even deploy LTE on all their base stations/panels. Only the ones deployed since early 2010. The 2008-2009 WiMax sites need to be replaced in order just to accommodate TD-LTE 2600 on them. There is not much value to the current Clearwire network. It's Frankennetwork. It really is good for only WiMax on 2600 and some TD-LTE on 2600. Any further upgrade to add AWS-4/S-Band LTE is just not worth the cost and difficulty.

 

If DISH wants to go with an easy, fast and cheap route to deployment, Sprint network hosting is the only way to go. And SoftBank may not even want to do hosting deals. Sprint wanted to do it for money. SoftBank doesn't need the money.

 

Robert

 

Shhhhh...we are trying to get Dish to buy it as is. :angry:

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Colleges and universities did not have any use for it and are leasing it to Clearwire. I don't know how many times we can say this. This spectrum is really a mismatch for the demographic makeup of the US, except for hotspot duty. Now, it is perfectly suited for fixed/nomadic broadband, but you have to account for backhaul costs, if you are going to use it like that. In fact, I had Sprint Broadband for both my office and home at one time, a year or two before cable internet.

It doesn't have to be colleges or universities. Maybe the next great invention will be able to use that spectrum. There's no reason for it to be wasted with BS protection sites that don't serve the public. the airwaves are a national trust and I would like to see them used or given back to the people.

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I totally disagree. While Clearwire may not be able to justify wimax in extremely rural areas, they could have justified full implementation in major markets like Phoenix, Detroit and San Diego. Instead of deploying protection sites in rural America, they should have returned those licenses to the government.

 

Just so I have a clearer understanding of where you stand, VZW acquired AWS spectrum licenses at auction back in 2006. Here it is, a full six years later and to the best of my knowledge they still have not deployed ANYTHING, ANYWHERE on that spectrum. According to your dogma, they should be forced to return those licenses to the government, correct?

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It doesn't have to be colleges or universities. Maybe the next great invention will be able to use that spectrum. There's no reason for it to be wasted with BS protection sites that don't serve the public. the airwaves are a national trust and I would like to see them used or given back to the people.

Sure Sprint will be happy to relinquish that spectrum provided that:

 

1. They are offered better compensatory spectrum elsewhere

2. They're let free of the leases for all the Cleawire sites and all the spectrum leases.

Edited by bigsnake49
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I totally disagree. While Clearwire may not be able to justify wimax in extremely rural areas, they could have justified full implementation in major markets like Phoenix, Detroit and San Diego. Instead of deploying protection sites in rural America, they should have returned those licenses to the government. There doesn't need to be an Angel in the wings to swoop in and use the spectrum. Surely, this 2600 MHz spectrum could be put to use by colleges, universities, local governments, or some other use. Just because no other cellco's want it does not mean that it's useless. I still believe the government should look into the 2600 MHz utilization as part of SoftBank, Sprint, Clear deal. If this happens maybe Sprint can get an even lower price.

 

You know that Clearwire fully intended to deploy in San Diego. They had the design complete and started permitting. They ran out of money. And Clearwire tried to sell spectrum twice since then and no one offered a bid. Please stop with the pipe dream that there were other uses. If someone had a good use for it, Clearwire would have sold it to them for a good price if they were approached all the way until Sprint offered to buy them out. Also, half of Clearwire spectrum came FROM colleges and universites. EBS spectrum was even more under utilized by schools than before Clearwire got a hold of it. That was the very definition of fallow spectrum.

 

You can guarantee that Sprint will put that spectrum to better use than Clearwire ever did.

 

Robert

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Just so I have a clearer understanding of where you stand, VZW acquired AWS spectrum licenses at auction back in 2006. Here it is, a full six years later and to the best of my knowledge they still have not deployed ANYTHING, ANYWHERE on that spectrum. According to your dogma, they should be forced to return those licenses to the government, correct?

Yes, VZW should use the spectrum or give it back. There needs to be a timeline. What VZW is doing is anti-competitive and they are trying to create a duopoly with AT&T.

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So...how about that WCS guys?

Sprint got some of that' date=' right?[/quote']

 

Sprint has some WCS, and in the near future, it will hopefully become more valuable because at&t is going to utilize the band.

 

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus running Paradigm 3.0 using Forum Runner

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You know that Clearwire fully intended to deploy in San Diego. They had the design complete and started permitting. They ran out of money.

Clear didn't JUST run out of money. They had a policy of delaying WiMAX in order to milk every last dime out of Sprint that they could.

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Clear didn't JUST run out of money. They had a policy of delaying WiMAX in order to milk every last dime out of Sprint that they could.

 

When Clearwire stopped deploying WiMax they had only enough money to pay for one year of operations. That would leave nothing to continue deployment. Clearwire would have loved to deploy in the markets they had already planned because they believed in their retail model and thought they would make a lot more revenues in these additional markets.

 

Clearwire didn't really start messing with Sprint until Sprint started coming down on them about the retail strategy. When Clearwire started running out of money, Sprint started pushing them to abandon their retail. Retail stores were burning cash on overhead and labor. And Clearwire was having to spend a lot of money on advertising to try to prop up their retail business.

 

Retail never paid for itself and lost a lot of money. Since Clearwire shuttered their retail strategy eventually, it turned out Sprint was right. And the billion bucks CLWR spent on it was wasted. That billion bucks would have paid for WiMax deployment in a dozen or more markets.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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I totally disagree. While Clearwire may not be able to justify wimax in extremely rural areas, they could have justified full implementation in major markets like Phoenix, Detroit and San Diego. Instead of deploying protection sites in rural America, they should have returned those licenses to the government. There doesn't need to be an Angel in the wings to swoop in and use the spectrum. Surely, this 2600 MHz spectrum could be put to use by colleges, universities, local governments, or some other use. Just because no other cellco's want it does not mean that it's useless. I still believe the government should look into the 2600 MHz utilization as part of SoftBank, Sprint, Clear deal. If this happens maybe Sprint can get an even lower price.

 

Anybody that has used wimax knows that it only works outside. As soon as you go inside a building you are basically screwed. Even if Sprint was able to put wimax in every single tower you would have so many deadzones it is not even funny. Especially here in Puerto Rico where the houses are made of concrete I could be 1/4 of a mile away from a wimax site and have no signal at all indoors, let alone 1 mile away. Now that we have LTE it goes through walls a lot easier. It might not be as good as AT&T's LTE going through walls, but its unlimited and way faster depending on the areas. Wimax is very similar to wifi in some ways and it is not the ideal thing for cell phones where you are constantly moving around.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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Anybody that has used wimax knows that it only works outside. As soon as you go inside a building you are basically screwed. Even if Sprint was able to put wimax in every single tower you would have so many deadzones it is not even funny. Especially here in Puerto Rico where the houses are made of concrete I could be 1/4 of a mile away from a wimax site and have no signal at all indoors, let alone 1 mile away. Now that we have LTE it goes through walls a lot easier. It might not be as good as AT&T's LTE going through walls, but its unlimited and way faster depending on the areas. Wimax is very similar to wifi in some ways and it is not the ideal thing for cell phones where you are constantly moving around.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

 

I agree that WiMax is less than ideal. But that being said, Puerto Rico only had WiMax Protection Sites. Protection sites are deployed with zero downtilt to maximize coverage. This only made the penetration problem worse. In fully deployed and appropriately dense network conditions, WiMax performed OK. But Sprint LTE is superior in every way.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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