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Sprint makes official offer to acquire Clearwire

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In conjunction with my post above, here are some scientific developments that obviate the need for additional spectrum:

 

The method -- time-domain transmit beamforming -- involves digitally creating a time-domain cancellation signal, coupling it to the radio frequency front end to allow the radio to hear much weaker incoming signals while transmitting strong outgoing signals at the same frequency and same time.

Today's wireless radios use two separate channels to transmit and receive signals, but full duplex radios transmit signals at the same time in the same frequency band. This can double the efficiency of the spectrum, but the problem is often interference between the transmission and receiving functions on full duplex radios.

 

http://www.innovationgeneration.com/author.asp?section_id=2807&doc_id=256003&

 

And algebraic answers to the capacity crunch:

 

http://www.innovationgeneration.com/author.asp?section_id=2557&doc_id=253598

 

That woman is an idiot and doesn't understand what she's talking about. TCP isn't licensed from anyone and the technique deals with TCP throttling due to missing packets, where reconstructing the missing packet greatly increases throughput by avoiding both the latency (where all subsequent packets are useless until the retransmit succeeds) and the receive window scaling where TCP tried to adjust to the bandwidth. Basically TCP assumes low packet loss which is often not the case for WiFi links.

 

Not to mention TCP is not the only protocol used on the Internet.

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So Sprint acquires Clearwire. Does Clearwire continue to be a seperate wholly owned company like Virgin or does it and it get absorbed into Sprint proper getting rid of some of Clearwires staff? If Clearwire remains separate the will still have a split purpose, they will want to sell cell hot spot off loading to other cell companies. As far as the rollout is concerned absorbing them would seem the best option to me.

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I believe Clearwire will get absorbed. I doubt sprint wants to stay in the home internet business. I do not believe they have the spectrum to keep up with the mobile demand and the home internet demand, plus Clearwire has already announced that they were moving towards a wholesale model. Sprint will likely combine them into their wholesale department, and start moving customers off the home internet before they shut down the Wimax network.

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I believe Clearwire will get absorbed. I doubt sprint wants to stay in the home internet business. I do not believe they have the spectrum to keep up with the mobile demand and the home internet demand, plus Clearwire has already announced that they were moving towards a wholesale model. Sprint will likely combine them into their wholesale department, and start moving customers off the home internet before they shut down the Wimax network.

 

They have enough spectrum to do fixed broadband. Now are the economics worth it? I don't know, maybe:). I Would like to hear what their plans are for the prodigious amount of spectrum that Clearwire has.

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Clearwire never made money on home internet. Sprint is likely to abandon it. They wanted Clearwire spectrum for long term mobile smartphone use. I expect Sprint to stop selling home ISP rather quickly after taking over Clearwire. Allowing existing customers to keep their WiMax, but allowing it to fade into the WiMax sunset of 2015.

 

Also, I expect Sprint really is just wanting the BRS spectrum. I expect Sprint to allow the EBS spectrum leases to lapse. They aren't worth the trouble, except perhaps in key Top 20 markets where they may need additional spectrum.

 

In my opinion, if you take EBS spectrum out of the equation, Sprint does not have enough spectrum in the long term to offer home ISP in most places. But why go through the trouble to go after home users? They pay much less per GB than mobile users and cause much greater strain on the network. It's just not worth it.

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Clearwire never made money on home internet. Sprint is likely to abandon it. They wanted Clearwire spectrum for long term mobile smartphone use. I expect Sprint to stop selling home ISP rather quickly after taking over Clearwire. Allowing existing customers to keep their WiMax, but allowing it to fade into the WiMax sunset of 2015.

 

Also, I expect Sprint really is just wanting the BRS spectrum. I expect Sprint to allow the EBS spectrum leases to lapse. They aren't worth the trouble, except perhaps in key Top 20 markets where they may need additional spectrum.

 

In my opinion, if you take EBS spectrum out of the equation, Sprint does not have enough spectrum in the long term to offer home ISP in most places. But why go through the trouble to go after home users? They pay much less per GB than mobile users and cause much greater strain on the network. It's just not worth it.

 

Maybe Dish can pay them to offer fixed broadband to Dish's customers. As far as giving back EBS spectrum, I'm all for it. Let somebody else take over the leases. They will have 100MHz of BRS even after getting rid of EBS. That is plenty of spectrum for both mobile and fixed/nomadic broadband. I am interested in it as a broadband connection for my laptop when I can't find WiFi. As long as you limit the speed/total GB to something reasonable and offer a reasonable price to where you can make money, I am all for it. Spectrum is useless if you're not using it. I don't foresee Sprint ever using more than 40MHz of BRS, unless everybody abandons their home internet connection and uses their mobile connection to download/steam movies to their TV.

Edited by bigsnake49

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Maybe Dish can pay them to offer fixed broadband to Dish's customers. As far as giving back EBS spectrum, I'm all for it. Let somebody else take over the leases. They will have 100MHz of BRS even after getting rid of EBS.

 

I think you have mentally reversed BRS and EBS. Total EBS bandwidth is 117.5 MHz, while total BRS bandwidth is 76.5 MHz. So, it would be impossible for Sprint to hold 100 MHz of BRS bandwidth. And of the 76.5 MHz total BRS bandwidth, only 55.5 MHz of that is "attributable" because it is in a contiguous block.

 

AJ

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I think you have mentally reversed BRS and EBS. Total EBS bandwidth is 117.5 MHz, while total BRS bandwidth is 76.5 MHz. So, it would be impossible for Sprint to hold 100 MHz of BRS bandwidth. And of the 76.5 MHz total BRS bandwidth, only 55.5 MHz of that is "attributable" because it is in a contiguous block.

 

AJ

 

You are are right! Actually the last 16.5MHz of the 76MHz block is an EBS block and not a BRS block. Which makes my opinion of this deal even less favorable. They could have put their money elsewhere.

Edited by bigsnake49

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You are are right! Actually the last 16.5MHz of the 76MHz block is an EBS block and not a BRS block.

 

Correct, on the latter count, but the 76.5 MHz total BRS bandwidth figure that I posted already excludes those high side EBS licenses. Beyond the 55.5 MHz "attributable" BRS2-H3 blocks of contiguous licenses, the other 21 MHz comes from the BRS1, E4, F4, and K blocks, which are located at the very bottom of BRS/EBS and/or not fully contiguous with the "attributable" 55.5 MHz. So, for TD-LTE deployment, that 55.5 MHz is likely to be the heart and soul.

 

AJ

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You are are right! Actually the last 16.5MHz of the 76MHz block is an EBS block and not a BRS block. Which makes my opinion of this deal even less favorable. They could have put their money elsewhere.

 

Well even if Sprint relinquished all EBS licenses and still has the core 55.5 MHz of 2.5 GHz spectrum nationwide, I think it was good deal. Clearwire was going to be dead in the water in 2013 so Sprint had to do something instead of trying to bail them out with more capital infusion. Then their total spectrum assets would be on par with verizon and AT&T and can easily bid on the full H block nationwide and maybe work a deal out with Dish for its 2 GHz.

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Correct, on the latter count, but the 76.5 MHz total BRS bandwidth figure that I posted already excludes those high side EBS licenses. Beyond the 55.5 MHz "attributable" BRS2-H3 blocks of contiguous licenses, the other 21 MHz comes from the BRS1, E4, F4, and K blocks, which are located at the very bottom of BRS/EBS and/or not fully contiguous with the "attributable" 55.5 MHz. So, for TD-LTE deployment, that 55.5 MHz is likely to be the heart and soul.

 

AJ

 

What is the purpose of the BRS1, BRS2, J and K blocks? It sucks that the FCC had to split the BRS E4 and F4 blocks between the upper and middle band. I am sure Sprint would have loved to have the BRS E4 and F4 blocks on the upper band so that they can just have about 68 MHz (55.5+12) of contiguous 2.5 GHz spectrum. With 68 MHz, Sprint could have done three 20 MHz TD-LTE carriers nationwide.

 

Also for TD-LTE could a wireless carrier deploy a 6 or 7 MHz carrier or any other odd number besides the 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 15 or 20 MHz deployments like in FDD-LTE?

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What happens to companies like FreedomPop and NetZero with their cheap cheap WiMax service? Aren't those loss leaders for Clearwire?

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What happens to companies like FreedomPop and NetZero with their cheap cheap WiMax service? Aren't those loss leaders for Clearwire?

 

Their contracts can be renogotiated if Sprint doesn't want to honor them as is. However, I think Sprint will want to maintain any revenue stream coming in to help pay for operating costs of the WiMax network until it is shutdown.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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Well even if Sprint relinquished all EBS licenses and still has the core 55.5 MHz of 2.5 GHz spectrum nationwide...

 

To be clear, Clearwire does not necessarily hold all 55.5 MHz of "attributable" BRS in every market. Contrary to popular belief, there are other BRS licensees.

 

AJ

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To be clear, Clearwire does not necessarily hold all 55.5 MHz of "attributable" BRS in every market. Contrary to popular belief, there are other BRS licensees.

 

AJ

 

This sounds like such a mess AGAIN. Well I hope Sprint can sort out all these EBS/BRS spectrum licenses nationwide so there there is at least 50-55 MHz of nationwide of Sprint's footprint of 2.5 GHz spectrum when all is said and done with the deal closed.

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To be clear, Clearwire does not necessarily hold all 55.5 MHz of "attributable" BRS in every market. Contrary to popular belief, there are other BRS licensees.

 

AJ

 

Definitely. And in places where this occurs, EBS licensees will have to be paid off handsomely to renew. And the licensees know it and are chomping at the bit to get back to the negotiating table.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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Definitely. And in places where this occurs, EBS licensees will have to be paid off handsomely to renew. And the licensees know it and are chomping at the bit to get back to the negotiating table.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

I'm very interested in learning more about these locations and this situation in general.

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This sounds like such a mess AGAIN. Well I hope Sprint can sort out all these EBS/BRS spectrum licenses nationwide so there there is at least 50-55 MHz of nationwide of Sprint's footprint of 2.5 GHz spectrum when all is said and done with the deal closed.

 

I am not terribly concerned. As long as Sprint has 20-60 MHz of contiguous BRS/EBS spectrum for TD-LTE 2600, everything will be fine. Anything beyond 60 MHz long term is excess.

 

Some of you root for Sprint to become the clear cut spectrum champ, but that is just not realistic. The other carriers and the FCC will not allow that. In an increasingly consolidated market, spectrum parity/proportionality will be the regulatory goal going forward.

 

So, have Sprint consent to drop many of its EBS leases within a few years. Let those leases float in the open market. That should appease the FCC. And the other carriers will have no choice but to go along. They talk a big game, as if Sprint has an unfair advantage by hoarding all of this BRS/EBS spectrum. But that is all they are -- talk. They are incredibly two faced. The other carriers do not really want any BRS/EBS spectrum, but they just do not want Sprint to have it either.

 

Thus, Sprint should let most/all EBS leases float freely in the open market. Then, when the other carriers show their true colors with their disinterest, Sprint may be able to pick up some EBS leases on the cheap. That is the fair way to proceed.

 

AJ

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The game is afoot...

 

http://www.reuters.c...tionNews&rpc=43

 

Dish seeks more time to fight Sprint's Softbank, Clearwire deals

 

 

By Sinead Carew

NEW YORK | Fri Dec 21, 2012 5:18pm EST

 

(Reuters) - Dish Network (DISH.O) has asked the U.S. telecom regulator for more time to file an objection to wireless service provider Sprint Nextel's (S.N) proposed sale of a controlling stake to Japan's SoftBank Corp (9984.T) due to Sprint's announcement this week of a plan to buy out Clearwire Corp (CLWR.O).

 

The request may indicate that satellite television provider Dish, controlled by billionaire founder Charlie Ergen, is gearing up for a fight with Sprint over its plan to sell a 70 percent stake to SoftBank for $20 billion. Dish declined further comment on the matter.

 

Dish, which recently gained regulatory approval to build its own wireless service, told the Federal Communications Commission in a document dated December 20 that it wants a three-week extension to the FCC's January 4 filing deadline for petitions against the Softbank deal, which was announced in October.

 

Earlier this week, Sprint, which owns 50.45 percent of Clearwire, said it agreed to buy the rest of Clearwire for $2.2 billion, in a deal that would be conditional on the success of the SoftBank purchase.

 

Sprint, the No. 3 U.S. mobile provider, declined to comment on the Dish filing on Friday.

 

It sent the FCC an amendment to its application for approval of the SoftBank deal on Thursday including notice of its agreement with Clearwire, which would gives Sprint control of the smaller company's substantial spectrum holdings.

 

Dish said in its filing that Sprint's plan "raises a number of issues deserving of careful consideration" and that interested parties need an appropriate amount of time to consider and address these issues.

 

For example, Dish questioned if it is in the public interest for a foreign company such as SoftBank to control more wireless spectrum than any other company in the United States.

 

It also asked whether the FCC should re-evaluate "the competitive effects" of a combination of Sprint's and Clearwire's spectrum holdings under one owner.

 

Dish and Sprint recently clashed with each other during the regulatory review of Dish's plans for its spectrum holdings.

 

Sprint is already meeting objections to the deal from some minority shareholders who are not happy with the $2.97 per share price it agreed on with Clearwire.

 

(Reporting By Sinead Carew and Liana B. Baker; Editing by Leslie Adler)

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Seems like much ado about nothing. Deutsche Telekom and Vodafone hold very large spectrum assets, that are much more valuable and useful than EBS/BRS. Also, it gives more competition for American consumers, not less.

 

I think Ergen may have had his own plan for CLWR and this is just sour grapes. Or possibly, he wants to be first in line for any CLWR spectrum divestiture. Meh.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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What if Ergen is protesting the Sprint-SoftBank-Clearwire transactions in an attempt to finagle a trade of his nationwide 40 MHz of S-band/AWS-4 (FDD) spectrum for Clearwire's nationwide but variable BRS/EBS (TDD) spectrum? Would you take that deal?

 

AJ

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I think it would've been better is Dish took over Clearwire, as it would mean that another competitor exists.

Sprint/Clearwire own a ton of Sprectrum, but in the majority of the country it is unused. They should be forced to sell or give away unused spectrum.

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What if Ergen is protesting the Sprint-SoftBank-Clearwire transactions in an attempt to finagle a trade of his nationwide 40 MHz of S-band/AWS-4 (FDD) spectrum for Clearwire's nationwide but variable BRS/EBS (TDD) spectrum? Would you take that deal?

 

AJ

 

I don't think Mr. Son would be keen on the idea. I'm pretty sure he wants TD-LTE 2600 for global scale of economies.

 

I personally would be OK with it...IF...Sprint hosted a TD-LTE 2600 network for DISH, DISH persued hotspot coverage for Sprint like Clearwire and Sprint customers could roam on it for reasonable terms. Because it will take a few years for Sprint to get the S band up and running. Getting LTE approved on it, getting devices starting to be built and a network deployed. Probably take 30-36 months. And Sprint will need a back up hotspot plan in the interim.

 

But now that I type that, it makes more sense to keep Clearwire and its assets. But the S Band is not the end of the world.

 

But no matter what, SoftBank wants Clearwire. Maybe as much as Sprint. I'm almost sure of that.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

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