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RSSI Question.


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I'm trying my best to find out what tower I'm connected to, but while I was on the ##DEBUG# menu, I noticed my 1x protocol has a 1x 2nd RSSI at -63. Is this always -63 and does this mean there's another tower that's got a -63 dBm signal? Also - does the Latitude/Longitude combo on this screen tell me which site I'm connected to?

 

Thanks

 

I'm on GS3 if it matters.

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I just got back from dropping off the wife at work, and from what I saw, using the CDMA tool, 1xRTT doesn't report BSLON and BSLAT like the eHRPD towers I'm seeing ...

 

Not sure why, but the tool let me map the towers that were reporting eHRPD (more than 1 tower in my area has changed over)...

 

A month ago I did speedtests in this area and never got nothing but 1xRTT and never got speeds over .30mbps down or up...

 

but just now, I did a few speedtests and got speeds of 1.20mbps down, .73mbps up....

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I'm trying my best to find out what tower I'm connected to, but while I was on the ##DEBUG# menu, I noticed my 1x protocol has a 1x 2nd RSSI at -63. Is this always -63 and does this mean there's another tower that's got a -63 dBm signal? Also - does the Latitude/Longitude combo on this screen tell me which site I'm connected to?

 

Thanks

 

I'm on GS3 if it matters.

 

It may be possible to be connected to a different 1x site with your second 1x antenna, however, the difference in signal is more likely the antenna location. The weaker one is more likely underneath your hand. On my Note 2, one is usually stronger than the other in my hand until I set my phone down. Then they get much closer in strength.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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It may be possible to be connected to a different 1x site with your second 1x antenna, however, the difference in signal is more likely the antenna location. The weaker one is more likely underneath your hand. On my Note 2, one is usually stronger than the other in my hand until I set my phone down. Then they get much closer in strength.

 

I am fairly certain that with CDMA1X receive diversity, both Rx antennas are always tracking the same PN offset. I do not believe that they can track different sectors/sites. So, the latter -- antenna location -- is the more likely explanation. One Rx antenna has a stronger path to the serving sector. Furthermore, the primary and secondary Rx antennas often have different gain structures. So, one may naturally acquire a stronger signal than the other even if field strength is identical at both antennas.

 

AJ

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I am fairly certain that with CDMA1X receive diversity, both Rx antennas are always tracking the same PN offset. I do not believe that they can track different sectors/sites. So, the latter -- antenna location -- is the more likely explanation. One Rx antenna has a stronger path to the serving sector. Furthermore, the primary and secondary Rx antennas often have different gain structures. So, one may naturally acquire a stronger signal than the other even if field strength is identical at both antennas.

 

AJ

 

I thought you may say something like this. That's why I used weak language like "may." I always appreciate your feedback on these subjects. :tu:

 

Robert

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I thought you may say something like this. That's why I used weak language like "may." I always appreciate your feedback on these subjects. :tu:

 

To be clear, CDMA1X most certainly does allow simultaneous connection to multiple PN offsets (i.e. soft/softer handoff), but that is through the use of a RAKE receiver, which requires only a single antenna and was part of cdmaOne from the beginning.

 

My understanding of CDMA1X receive diversity is that it can be used to extend coverage and/or improve capacity. In CDMA1X, both coverage and capacity are limited by power. By using two Rx diversity antennas in the handset, a base station may be able to cover a greater distance at the same power level because when the handset's primary Rx antenna is in a fade, the secondary Rx antenna probably has a stronger signal path. Similarly, a base station may able to provide greater capacity by lowering its power level because, again, the two Rx diversity antennas help the handset cope with weaker signal strength.

 

AJ

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So, then where is the lte antenna because I'd rather have it closer to the 2nd 1x antenna rather than the primary one Lol!

 

Primary is in the -80s, 2ndary is high -60s.

 

Also thanks all for the wonderful explanations.

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

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Ascertion, can you post some CDMA1X engineering screen caps? I am not certain that Rx diversity is active in idle state, only in traffic state. Thus, the secondary antenna stats might not be valid. I would like to see one screen cap with the handset idle, another screen cap with the handset on a traffic channel in the same location.

 

Now, speaking of Rx diversity, here are a couple of Galaxy Note 2 jokes...

 

That phone's so big, one Rx antenna is in New Jersey, the other is in Ohio.

That phone's so big, one Rx antenna gets free night & weekend calling an hour before the other does.

That phone's so big, when it switches from the primary to the secondary antenna, you get charged long distance.

 

:P

 

AJ

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