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rwhittaker13

Network Vision and LTE deployment strategy

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Yep' date=' and once we have NV complete, you'll see similar speeds.[/quote']

So far so good for me. Speeds in my area have been getting much better, but in-building coverage does still lack in areas. At the mall in butler, there's a tower not even a half mile away on the hillside, but when I go into hot topic, or FYE, I do not get any service oddly.

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Some of the best speeds I've ever seen on sprint

 

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I am very disappointed with how sprint is rolling out LTE, areas with significantly lower populations than my area are being upgraded before mines. It makes no sense at all. Areas with millions of people are being totally ignored by sprint. Both ATT and Verizon have LTE here, but we will be lucky to get it be 2014.

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I am very disappointed with how sprint is rolling out LTE, areas with significantly lower populations than my area are being upgraded before mines. It makes no sense at all. Areas with millions of people are being totally ignored by sprint. Both ATT and Verizon have LTE here, but we will be lucky to get it be 2014.

 

I disagree. Sprint is deploying in almost all large markets first. However, there are some smaller communities within those large markets that may have things ready. Should they have workers sit in those markets doing nothing until more worthy sites are ready? No way. Keep those guys working on anything and everything ready. Because Sprint is converting every single site in the country. So if a site is ready to convert, they need to jump on it.

 

Robert via Samsung Note II via Tapatalk

 

 

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I do see that they have done many large population areas, but they are also a few that seem to be getting ignored Placed like Denver, Pittsburgh and Sacramento all with 2.6, 2.4, and 2.2 million people aren't on any list, while other areas with half of their population are on the list.

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DVCal, I am not singling you out. I am using "you" in the collective sense, referring to many people, but you are part of that collective.

 

You need to drop the ego. You and your population base are important to you but not nearly as important in the grand scheme of things as you would like to believe.

 

Unlike VZW and AT&T, Sprint is redeploying effectively every site in every market in one big initiative. No carrier could do so in every market simultaneously, so some markets get earlier deployments than others. That is simply a fact of life -- deal with it.

 

But Sprint is not "ignoring" any markets. Even in markets that have had no site launches yet, plenty of work is occurring behind the scenes. That includes planning and also waiting for backhaul, in which Sprint is at the mercy of our dysfunctional special access system run by oligopolists.

 

In short, cool your heels. Sprint is doing something unprecedented -- rebuilding its entire network "from the ground up" -- but that takes time. And patience is a virtue.

 

AJ

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DVCal, I am not singling you out. I am using "you" in the collective sense, referring to many people, but you are part of that collective.

 

You need to drop the ego. You and your population base are important to you but not nearly as important in the grand scheme of things as you would like to believe.

 

Unlike VZW and AT&T, Sprint is redeploying effectively every site in every market in one big initiative. No carrier could do so in every market simultaneously, so some markets get earlier deployments than others. That is simply a fact of life -- deal with it.

 

But Sprint is not "ignoring" any markets. Even in markets that have had no site launches yet, plenty of work is occurring behind the scenes. That includes planning and also waiting for backhaul, in which Sprint is at the mercy of our dysfunctional special access system run by oligopolists.

 

In short, cool your heels. Sprint is doing something unprecedented -- rebuilding its entire network "from the ground up" -- but that takes time. And patience is a virtue.

 

AJ

 

Couldn't agree more. Also, the comments concerning people "believing it when they see it" regarding every tower being upgraded don't make a whole lot of sense to me since unless Sprint does this, they can't monetize their spectrum holdings. And we all know that is the whole purpose of Sprint. I am still amazed at the number of people these organizations can put to work in an endeavor all at once.

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I'm a full believer in the I believe it when I see it. And I saw it! The tower isn't on yet, but see any upgrades in my market is definitely a shocker. The long time forgotten market of all markets that Sprint probably wishes they wouldn't have had to purchase up from the affiliate. It will come in due time and what Sprint is doing is really just unheard of!

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I'm a full believer in the I believe it when I see it. And I saw it! The tower isn't on yet, but see any upgrades in my market is definitely a shocker. The long time forgotten market of all markets that Sprint probably wishes they wouldn't have had to purchase up from the affiliate. It will come in due time and what Sprint is doing is really just unheard of!

 

Hopefully there are more than adequate resources for markets such as yours now that Nextel is out of the picture. I do understand that living in the Northeast where I do, I probably see the better parts of the Sprint network.

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Part of the disbelief comes from the WiMax mess with Clearwire. I can understand it but this is all in house Sprint work this time. Sprint bet on WiMax and Clearwire and lost. This arguably could be the best thing that could have happened because they sre replacing the whole network.

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Let's look at my metro for an example... Whenever phoenix gets lte. It won't just be phx it will be mesa. It will be Tempe.. It will be Apache Junction. Glendale. Chandler Gilbert and Maricopa.. And to a lesser extent casa Grande.. 7 so called smaller cities most ppl never heard of one metropolitan area. If only the city of phoenix received lte before sprint moved on to another market.. Only a small percentage of the phx market would be represented.

 

Sprint is lighting up markets. Which are composed of large cities and the smaller towns around them. Look at the big picture not just the I want lte now I live in a big city and don't care about who else is in my market. Making a network that works efficiently is more than just putting up arrays and hope for the best.

 

I get and understand your frustration I live in the 5th highest populated city while towns back home in Indiana are getting lte(Indianapolis market) Iget the frustration but understanding why one market iinvolves more than just a any one city helps. Someday we all will have lte... Someone has to be first and someone has to be last it will eventually get done.

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Hopefully there are more than adequate resources for markets such as yours now that Nextel is out of the picture. I do understand that living in the Northeast where I do, I probably see the better parts of the Sprint network.

 

Anything can be better than what we have now. The only reason I have stayed is due to SERO. Some people hate seeing other people have it but some areas need it to compete. I was almost out the door until it was offered to me. The guy at the store told me I had to upgrade my plan when I got the Note2, I laughed and said I think I will just change carriers then. Of course I got the, Sprint offers the best value. Yes, but SERO is Sprint's way of saying yeah we have issues here, but here hang around for a bit ;)

 

Sent from a little old Note 2

 

 

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Yes, but SERO is Sprint's way of saying yeah we have issues here, but here hang around for a bit ;)

 

I wish that were true, but I continue to believe that SERO is nothing more than a loophole that will eventually be closed, rightly so. It is a Sprint Employee Referral Offer, in which seemingly 99 percent of SERO subs have no legitimate connection to any Sprint employee.

 

Years ago, I could have switched to a SERO plan but chose not to on ethical grounds.

 

AJ

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I understand small cities getting up with larger cities, but there are smaller markets that are by them self getting upgraded before much larger markets. I would think the upgrade should happen by market size. What is kind of annoying is a small town 30 minutes from here is schedule to go live early 2013, while we will be lucky to see it by mid 2014.

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As I understand it they just don't pick a town here and there. They pick one of the 98(?) zones that make up the whole network to work on.

Lets say you decide all of X market, say 300 sites total and decide that's the next area your going to work on. 100 of those may be in the big urban area and 100 in mid size towns and 100 out in the boonies. You start work to get all 300 done ASAP. Its a lot easier to plan, get permits, and a ton of other stuff in the rural areas than in a lot of urban areas. Engineering will likely be easier if its the only site covering a spot than if you have to worry about 4 or 5 real close. I think those are a lot of the reason why it looks like the small towns are getting done before the big. They are trying to do them all as fast as possible, Its more of heck ya get to it we wan't it here in the boonies verse you don't have your J-138/108T form cosigned by the department of sanitation verifying there is no plumbing at this place of business. Then you get that done and they say you need a waver for having a place of business with out plumbing from some other code enforcement department. Ok bad made up example but it makes a point.

 

 

This keeps coming up. It may be time for someone to write the definitive response and just post a link to it

 

Only Sprint knows all the details of why market A gets done before market B and town A before town B. One thing I do know is they are doing the whole network as fast as they can mainly because its in their best interest to get it done ASAP.

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Its more of heck ya get to it we wan't it here in the boonies verse you don't have your J-138/108T form cosigned by the department of sanitation verifying there is no plumbing at this place of business.

 

Uh, yeah, we need to talk about your TPS reports...

 

Bill Lumbergh

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Uh, yeah, we need to talk about your TPS reports...

 

Bill Lumbergh

 

Get 'er done.

 

Larry the Cable guy.

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I wish that were true, but I continue to believe that SERO is nothing more than a loophole that will eventually be closed, rightly so. It is a Sprint Employee Referral Offer, in which seemingly 99 percent of SERO subs have no legitimate connection to any Sprint employee.

 

Years ago, I could have switched to a SERO plan but chose not to on ethical grounds.

 

AJ

 

Hope NV is kicking good and a few necessary towers have been added by the time they close it otherwise I just don't see the value anymore.

 

Sent from a little old Note 2

 

 

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I wish that were true, but I continue to believe that SERO is nothing more than a loophole that will eventually be closed, rightly so. It is a Sprint Employee Referral Offer, in which seemingly 99 percent of SERO subs have no legitimate connection to any Sprint employee.

 

Back in the day the vice president of strategy for Sprint posted how to get SERO with his name as a referral. Still to this day he publishes how to get Everything Plus Referral Program on his website.

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From a long retired Telco digital facilities engineer (the view from the fiber facilities side).

 

"Run fiber to the cell site" is an easy thing to say, but not something that a customer will "have by next Tuesday." There are even times when there is no economic value to spending vast sums of money to bury fiber at $30/foot for ten miles when there is little likelyhood of revenue even approaching outlay anytime in the next 40 years.

 

Urban runs have other problems, expenses and delays, including right-of-ways, permits, seasonal issues, road blockage/construction, etc.

 

Some areas will already have a fiber build close by, but many will not, and with as full as many urban conduit runs are, tearing up blocks or even miles of arterial has to be permitted by so many different offices - each with their own agenda - that the time from request to in-service can sometimes be measured in years. :(

 

Sent from Photon Q LTE - Tapatalk

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I don't see how what sprint is doing is much different then when verizon first launched its LTE network. Verizon launched LTE in all of the major population areas of California within a few months of each other, it looks like sprint will take closer to 2 years. I don't see how that is faster.

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I don't see how what sprint is doing is much different then when verizon first launched its LTE network. Verizon launched LTE in all of the major population areas of California within a few months of each other' date=' it looks like sprint will take closer to 2 years. I don't see how that is faster.[/quote']

 

Verizon merely added a LTE overlay to their existing network. Sprint is completely renovating their network. Two different things.

 

Also, Verizon used 700 mhz spectrum, so their initial rollout could achieve "blanket (outdoor) coverage" with few, sparse sites. Then they go back and thicken the sites to provide in-building coverage and additional capacity.

 

If you came here just to complain about Sprint not meeting your needs, I suggest you find a different website. Community.sprint.com would be a good one for you.

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Verizon merely added a LTE overlay to their existing network. Sprint is completely renovating their network. Two different things.

 

Also, Verizon used 700 mhz spectrum, so their initial rollout could achieve "blanket (outdoor) coverage" with few, sparse sites. Then they go back and thicken the sites to provide in-building coverage and additional capacity.

 

If you came here just to complain about Sprint not meeting your needs, I suggest you find a different website. Community.sprint.com would be a good one for you.

 

I am just sadden that while Verizon and ATT decided my area should be among the earlier markets, sprint has decided it should be among the last markets.

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I am just sadden that while Verizon and ATT decided my area should be among the earlier markets, sprint has decided it should be among the last markets.

 

Which market?

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Which market?

 

Sacramento, Verizon launched in early 2011, sprint will be lucky by mid to late 2014.

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