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MacinJosh

Reasons people choose iOS instead of Android

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Per bollar's request, here is a topic for reasons to choose iOS instead of Android.

 

#1 I own over 600 free or paid iOS apps

 

#2 Everyone around me uses iPhones, so having one gives me access to iMessage, as some don't receive my regular text messages.

 

Sent from my LG Viper 4G LTE using Forum Runner

 

(Reasons like "Android Sucks" & "iOS rules" or anything similar are not valid. Please do not post them. I prefer the customization of flashing different ROM's and their associated themes that Android phones have compared to iOS. So I'm not partial to either Operating System.)

Edited by MacinJosh
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This will be closed! It's pure flame bait

 

A statement like that if an invitation for those that like to flame.

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iPhones are easy to use. The interface is much more intuitive for many, especially those who are not technologically literate.

 

On Sprint, the iPhone 4 for free beats out anything else around that price. Many people coming from awful phones jump on that. I would rather an iPhone 4 on iOS 6 than a Kyocera Rise for $19.99 + $50 MIR.

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iPhones are easy to use. The interface is much more intuitive for many' date=' especially those who are not technologically literate.

 

On Sprint, the iPhone 4 for free beats out anything else around that price. Many people coming from awful phones jump on that. I would rather an iPhone 4 on iOS 6 than a Kyocera Rise for 19.99 + 50 MIR.[/quote']

 

And yet, strangely enough, the Rise is the only Android that is compatible with the new Direct Connect Now app.

 

Sent from my LG Viper 4G LTE using Forum Runner

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For the average user, Applecare+ is superior to Sprint's TEP. $49 for a replacement phone if you break it vs 100/150, tech support through Apple (which is phenomenal, especially phone). And $99/2 years is again cheaper than $8/11 per month.

 

Downsides: no lost/stolen coverage. Only two incidents. No coverage for massive damage. No coverage after two years.

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And yet, strangely enough, the Rise is the only Android that is compatible with the new Direct Connect Now app.

 

Sent from my LG Viper 4G LTE using Forum Runner

I agree, it is strange. Sprint should release it for free for all Androids, and lower the MRC. Bring Direct Connect back!

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The iphone has had the same interface since it's beginning. This is exactly why Samsung Touchwiz on Ics/Jellybean look like Gingerbread. People are comfortable with whatever they start with and most people started with an iphone.

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They need a phone that fits in their skinny jeans ;)

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The iphone has had the same interface since it's beginning. This is exactly why Samsung Touchwiz on Ics/Jellybean look like Gingerbread. People are comfortable with whatever they start with and most people started with an iphone.

 

I agree. Main UI interaction is important for most users. That is the reason why the MacOS had the same basic Finder from the beginning up until now, just with different backend for making it run. Most regular users wouldn't notice much difference except for the OS UI theme that Apple keeps trying to improve upon. I kinda miss Aqua now.

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Certainly Apple's ecosystem is a good reason to want to be with iOS, but there are other considerations...

 

On the software side, I value that the iOS user experience is consistent from version to version. I like that my three year old 3GS is able to run iOS 6 and use most of its features. I also like that iOS 6 has been out for only three weeks, but 60% of iPhones have already updated to it.

 

On the developer side, I like that it's easy to develop using Apple's tools. I also like that it's easy to get a great user experience across all iPhones -- the only significant challenge is if I want to support iPhone 3 since the APIs for it are two years old now.

 

On the hardware side I like smaller phones and I like the iPhone's design. Although I wouldn't change platforms for it, an SGIII variant that's iPhone 4 sized would be interesting to me. I'm also not really in to having to fidget to make things work. I don't want to have to try different firmware revisions to make LTE work correctly, or to get rid of carrier-installed bloatware. I also don't like having the carrier decide when I'm going to be able to get an upgrade.

 

My company develops for every platform and while I respect the folks on my team who love their Android, WP and Blackberry devices, I'm happy with my choice. I can and do develop for Android and I like the platform, but it's not my favorite.

 

In any event, I'm on this forum to learn about Sprint's LTE rollout and share constructively to the conversation here - not to challenge people on their smartphone decisions.

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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They need a phone that fits in their skinny jeans ;)

 

Mom and dad from the Samsung commercial wear skinny jeans?

 

;)

 

AJ

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Hey bollar, what apps do you work on? PM me if you can't share publicly.

 

The iPhone was the first one to do smartphones right, IMHO. Now that I'm in the ecosystem there is no reason to change. Plus as an iOS developer I have an ulterior motive to evangelize the platform.

 

The support is excellent and I love that the company in control if the iPhone experience is Apple, not the carrier.

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I love that the company in control if the iPhone experience is Apple, not the carrier.

 

I prefer android, but I respect apple and the iphone ecosystem.

 

That said, I think the above quote exemplifies the single greatest thing that sets apart the android vs apple equation.

 

Apple (and att for that matter) made a huge risk as apple being in the driver seat.

 

Google and android shortcut everything by being open and allowing pretty much unlimited customization, both carrier and device manufacturer (albeit there are still limitations if you want to stay within the google ecosystem).

 

The nexus line is google trying to reign in the control, but the cat is out of the bag now. I think it will take a truly groundbreaking nexus phone, that google can control absolutely and show everyone that 2 can play apple's game.

 

Other than perhaps the nexus 7, the nexus line while nice and pure google, I think is safe to say that none of them have been mind blowingly ground breaking.

 

Google must deliver a device which offers the 'tightness' of the iphone's quality and simplistic efficiency, while keeping the openness and customization that customers want, with the future-proofing of consistent upgrades and improvements in software.

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That's the one thing I don't like with Apple is their app store approval/removal process. Too many times have I seen an app removed, the app never makes it to Apple, or either the app is neutered. Combine that with there are a lot of times there is a free version on Android, but yet it cost money on Apple. The kids have iPod touch devices and brought that up to me many times, asking "how can I get this on my ipod? It's free on the android tablet."

 

I understand they are trying to create a solid experience for the user by keeping the garbage apps out of the store, but in my opinion they have gone overboard. I prefer to filter stuff myself, and not have some yo-yo in his cubicle deciding what apps and features I can have. It's kind of like government with the helmet law in some states. It should be your choice to wear (install an app) the helmet or not, you're only going to hurt yourself if you make a mistake.

 

I also like the ability of being able to install apps that are not on the market (without rooting/jailbreaking). Like in the past, Google succumbed to the masses of removing the gaming console emulators and even the RoamControl app from the market. No biggie. You just went else where to get the apps and installed them. Again, you're choice, you're risk.

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There are several reasons to respect apple. The tightness of integration and rolling out OSs to phones 3 years old. I do sometimes worry that we (on the android side) are too dependant on a carrier or manufacturer to go back and customize for a phone that is no longer bring in big bucks.

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When transitioning my wife from Blackberry I chose iPhone/iOS over Android for several reasons.

  • UI was going to be friendly for her right out of the box. Easy to navigate and setup.
  • Confidence that the device and software was going to work well together from the beginning. No need for any customization
  • Form factor was in line with what she wanted
  • Less headache for me with questions about why something isn't working or how do I get this back or what happened to my widgets, etc.

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My main reason for choosing Android over iOS is simple. I really dislike Apple, and while they release beautiful products, I am not a fan of using them. I actually find it hard to use an iPhone than my Android phone. To me not having a dedicated back key, or being able to have a menu key option is just really confusing to me. Not to mention that to bring up certain options you have to click the home button multiple times.

 

 

I have a very hard time using iOS since I'm so used to Android. I actually feel dumb using iOS. But that's just me, I know that once you get used to it, it's very simple and fluid.

 

 

-Luis

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My main reason for choosing Android over iOS is simple. I really dislike Apple, and while they release beautiful products, I am not a fan of using them. I actually find it hard to use an iPhone than my Android phone. To me not having a dedicated back key, or being able to have a menu key option is just really confusing to me. Not to mention that to bring up certain options you have to click the home button multiple times.

 

 

I have a very hard time using iOS since I'm so used to Android. I actually feel dumb using iOS. But that's just me, I know that once you get used to it, it's very simple and fluid.

 

 

-Luis

 

That's like me with Windows. The first computer I learned how to use was a Macintosh. Then my mom bought an IBM PS/1 (I think the PS stood for "Piece of S***"). It was harder to figure out Windows 3.1, and I was just annoyed by it. The only thing that was cool on it was the After Dark Screensaver collection. (I used to watch Marbles every single night.) Then when my grandparents bought a Mac, I settled right back into one so easily. They loved theirs so much, my grandpa went and spent somewhere between $2,000 and $3,000 for my mom to have one too. I customized that machine every way I could. It was great. During the 90's and most of the 2000's I had to use a PC for school because Microsoft Office for System 7 (At that time it was just Word & Excel) just wasn't cutting it for my schoolwork, and we couldn't afford a new Mac, so I bought a custom PC. But I still hated Windows because to me it wasn't as user friendly as all my Macs were growing up. But now I still need Windows for school, so I just use Parallels or VM Ware Fusion.

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That's like me with Windows. The first computer I learned how to use was a Macintosh. Then my mom bought an IBM PS/1 (I think the PS stood for "Piece of S***"). It was harder to figure out Windows 3.1, and I was just annoyed by it. The only thing that was cool on it was the After Dark Screensaver collection. (I used to watch Marbles every single night.) Then when my grandparents bought a Mac, I settled right back into one so easily. They loved theirs so much, my grandpa went and spent somewhere between $2,000 and $3,000 for my mom to have one too. I customized that machine every way I could. It was great. During the 90's and most of the 2000's I had to use a PC for school because Microsoft Office for System 7 (At that time it was just Word & Excel) just wasn't cutting it for my schoolwork, and we couldn't afford a new Mac, so I bought a custom PC. But I still hated Windows because to me it wasn't as user friendly as all my Macs were growing up. But now I still need Windows for school, so I just use Parallels or VM Ware Fusion.

 

 

La Escuela! I use Splashtop on my Asus when I have to run Windows Specific programs. Granted it came free with my tablet, I would not pay to use that program. I find Macs very hard to use, especially when the right click is found by holding the Function or whatever button. That has nothing to do with iOS, but I think they have the same philosophy with iOS. Hidden functionalities (is that what that would be called?)

 

 

-Luis

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La Escuela! I use Splashtop on my Asus when I have to run Windows Specific programs. Granted it came free with my tablet, I would not pay to use that program. I find Macs very hard to use, especially when the right click is found by holding the Function or whatever button. That has nothing to do with iOS, but I think they have the same philosophy with iOS. Hidden functionalities (is that what that would be called?)

 

It's true that OS X has a dizzying array of keyboard shortcuts and right click options. If you ever have to use a Mac again, you'll be pleased to know that right click is now supported by all OS X input devices and just needs to be enabled in system preferences.

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My main reason for choosing Android over iOS is simple. I really dislike Apple, and while they release beautiful products, I am not a fan of using them. I actually find it hard to use an iPhone than my Android phone. To me not having a dedicated back key, or being able to have a menu key option is just really confusing to me. Not to mention that to bring up certain options you have to click the home button multiple times.

 

 

I have a very hard time using iOS since I'm so used to Android. I actually feel dumb using iOS. But that's just me, I know that once you get used to it, it's very simple and fluid.

 

 

-Luis

 

Sounds just like me when I try to navigate around on someone's ipod/iphone. The one button thing drives me nuts as I just want to flip over to another app and not close the one I'm in.

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Sounds just like me when I try to navigate around on someone's ipod/iphone. The one button thing drives me nuts as I just want to flip over to another app and not close the one I'm in.

 

iOS will keep the app suspended in the background unless the app doesn't support it or the system is low on memory.

 

It's funny... Some of the things you dislike are reasons why I like it. I want someone else to curate the apps for me. I don't wanna have to check for background services to see why my battery life is terrible. Sometimes those are trade offs and I wish I could do XYZ as a developer but on balance I find it to be worth it.

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One example of the kid in the cubicle killing off useful apps, check out the Sensorly thread.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

 

 

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Like I said, it's a trade-off. If you give developers enough rope, they'll hang themselves (or their users), like having an app run in the background continuously instead of making use of the push notification service because doing a thread sleep, fetch url every 30 seconds is way, way easier to write. While either method works, the sleep method consumes a ton of battery checking on things the user may not even care about.

 

The vast, vast majority of computer/cell phone users don't know or care what permissions, background processes, etc are. They have no idea how to read that information and wouldn't even think to look at it if they did. Half of all adults in the US probably don't know the difference between RAM and Disk/Flash.

 

So it's just my opinion but as a user, I like knowing that I'll never have to confront a huge permissions dialog or accidentally install malware on my phone. I like knowing I never have to check for a list of running applications or kill a background process, nor wonder if the new app I just installed is eating my battery. That also means I can't run apps like Sensorly**. That's what I meant by "trade-off".

 

There is one benefit of starting off more restricted: Apple can introduce new APIs or relax restrictions when needed. Android will always be a wild-wild west because taking any of the APIs away or changing them will break tons of existing software. Since devs can just check the boxes to request all permissions in the world, they do because it's easier and almost no one reads or understands that dialog anyway. That's why Microsoft has had such a terrible time with Windows bugs, fragile apps, etc and especially had extremely poor results trying to get apps to stop requiring Administrator access (UAC). Devs and users got so used to it they just assumed it, as a result every random macro, script, or downloaded file runs with the user's full administrator rights. Once the install base is too big the cat's out of the bag and you can't go back and change it without massive headaches.

 

 

 

** Of course I can run anything I want on my phone; as a developer I can sign apps, make apps that call into private APIs, etc. Anyone else can do the same if you're willing to part with $100/year for the developer program. You can also use a hackintosh to install apps on test devices, though submitting apps to the store requires a real Mac.

 

I've maintained all along that Apple should have a "dev light" or "power user" mode buried deep in the options. Charge a small fee ($25?) and have it install a special certificate on the phone or whatever.... that mode would open up and allow most of the stuff jailbreaking gets you today, but in an "at your own risk" way. Normal users would never see it but tech nerds could choose to take responsibility for it if they wanted.

 

I also think Apple needs a special "System Utility" category that allows root access, full access to the filesystem, etc. Maybe not for the mobile devices, but it is definitely needed for the Mac App Store. Those apps could go through more review, etc but there are a few legitimate cases where such access is needed... but imagine the headlines if Apple blocked some scummy or unknown developer from that category.

 

They really do strive to be fair and treat everyone the same... they apply the same rules to EA as they do to me. Their App Store appeals board is also quite fair - if you can make the case they can and will overrule the reviewers and have done so on many occasions. My app updates get reviewed within 7 days, just like Rovio or Microsoft, even though one has revenue several orders of magnitude bigger than mine and the other is Apple's competitor. Apple sets the rules but the playing field is level within those rules. As far as I know they don't take promotional payments for app placements either - the search results are what they are, you can't buy your way to the top.

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