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900Mhz Spectrum

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I was browsing Cellular Spectrum over at Wikipedia (great source, i know ;)) and I noticed that ITU recommended using the 900Mhz spectrum for wireless services in 2003. Band FQ Band UL DL Channel # UL Channel# DL VIII 900 880 - 915 925 - 960 2712–2863 2937 - 3088

 

What is the 900Mhz band used for in the US? Is this something that the FCC could auction off to wireless providers? It would be another lower frequency band that would offer great rural coverage or building penetration. However, it would require new devices and network build out.

 

What say ye oh great minds of wireless spectrum? ;)

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I was browsing Cellular Spectrum over at Wikipedia (great source, i know ;)) and I noticed that ITU recommended using the 900Mhz spectrum for wireless services in 2003.

Band FQ Band UL DL Channel # UL Channel# DL VIII 900 880 - 915 925 - 960 2712–2863 2937 - 3088

 

What is the 900Mhz band used for in the US? Is this something that the FCC could auction off to wireless providers?

 

Nope. This is the original GSM band in most countries outside of North America, so I call it the GSM 900 MHz band. It cannot be used in the US because it partly overlaps the Cellular 850 MHz, SMR 900 MHz, and ISM 900 MHz bands.

 

Some of the GSM zealots and unlocked phone addicts would have the US bend over backward and clear spectrum in use to align with the Eurasians, even though our bands predate theirs. But that gets it wrong. The US is still the most important market in the world; the Eurasians need to align with us, not the other way around.

 

To quote the Mooninites, "Point is, we're at the center. Not you."

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhTqdbBI0XQ

 

AJ

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