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Fastest 3g speeds ever seen?


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I made the op without listing my original question. How fast can 3g get on the users end? I've seen signs that it maxes out at 7.2mbps but I've never seen an EvDo RevA speed test pull anything higher than what I posted.

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Nice! If I could get those kind of speeds consistently, I would hardly care about NV and LTE.

 

It's definitely the large reason I have sprint. I can handle a lot of data when my internet or power goes out.

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I believe that evdo rev a maxed out at 3.2 theoretical top speed.

 

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

 

3072 is the highest link speed. You have to have a very good connection along with an empty carrier on that sector and enough backhaul to support that so it is rare... Hell 2.7 is rare.. I don't even think I have hit that on an airave.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

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3072 is the highest link speed. You have to have a very good connection along with an empty carrier on that sector and enough backhaul to support that so it is rare... Hell 2.7 is rare.. I don't even think I have hit that on an airave.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

Once I got my airrave and had my evo 4g tethered to my laptop just to see if it would change the speed and i got 3.01 mbs down. But that only happened once.
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Very impressive. The fastest I've ever hit was 2.55mbps. Dang I miss those speeds...
I'm starting to see a lot more 2mbps speeds thanks to nv. It's exciting to see Sprint stepping it up, if they keep it up, I can see them growing exponentially.
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I remember when I had a Sprint broadband card for my laptop, when I was in high school. The internet used to fly with that card, it was the best wireless internet you could get. I constantly saw speeds of at least 2.6 I even seen 3.0 a couple of times.

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The highest I even got was 2.1Mbps, that was back in June 2011. This is right before the EVO 3D release and just after the beginning of the network slowdown in NYC.

 

So the Sprints network wasn't always slow? What happened to it that it got so slow because from June from last year to now its pretty hard to believe that the network wen't from 2.1Mbps to roughly 0.10Mbps in some areas. What happened that it fell so quickly?

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I think the slowdown is largely due to congestion. I was in Puerto Rico, and I don't think the cell carriers are as congested there, so I was able to stream netflix over 3G, something I definitely can't do here without NV.

Also, I got this result with full bars (wasn't recording the dBm for that, sorry), on a NV updated tower, it's my fastest yet.

227760090.png

Edited by feteru
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So the Sprints network wasn't always slow? What happened to it that it got so slow because from June from last year to now its pretty hard to believe that the network wen't from 2.1Mbps to roughly 0.10Mbps in some areas. What happened that it fell so quickly?

in the last year, sprint introduced the iphone. Also, new phones and being the only unlimited carrier has customers running to Sprint. Problem is, sprint wasn't prepared for that many users and now a lot of areas have slow connections. But, with network vision, it's only going ti get better.
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in the last year, sprint introduced the iphone. Also, new phones and being the only unlimited carrier has customers running to Sprint. Problem is, sprint wasn't prepared for that many users and now a lot of areas have slow connections. But, with network vision, it's only going ti get better.

So the Sprints network wasn't always slow? What happened to it that it got so slow because from June from last year to now its pretty hard to believe that the network wen't from 2.1Mbps to roughly 0.10Mbps in some areas. What happened that it fell so quickly?

Believe it or not, it wasn't. The 2.1Mbps was a burst. Normally, I would getting somewhere between .8 and 1.4Mbps(the latter late at night/early mornings). I June 2011 onward, speeds dropped dramatically to about .4-.6Mbps avg's during the day. By September, the average highs were in the low 400's(kbps). When I left Sprint in March, the last speed test I took only got up to .26Mbps.

3G speeds were already horrible when the iPhone arrived, and surprisingly, didn't really make speeds much worse.

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So the Sprints network wasn't always slow?

in the last year, sprint introduced the iphone.

 

None of this objective fact. But this conjecture is fairly well supported and has been posted numerous times on S4GRU.

 

The iPhone did not help, but Clearwire -- its failure to roll out WiMAX fully and harmonize it with Sprint's existing footprint -- is what brought the Sprint EV-DO network to its knees.

 

A year or more before Sprint started selling the iPhone, Sprint sold countless phones in the HTC EVO and Samsung Epic series and expected much of their data usage to be offloaded to the Clearwire WiMAX network. But Clearwire hit the skids and botched the deployment, so much of the data burden fell back on the Sprint EV-DO network, which was not prepared for the unexpected onslaught.

 

AJ

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People also forget that Sprint let the network cruise on autopilot with very little money spent on upgrades and new towers for a couple of years. Maybe it was somewhat of a good thing as we have a total overhaul now.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

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People also forget that Sprint let the network cruise on autopilot with very little money spent on upgrades and new towers for a couple of years. Maybe it was somewhat of a good thing as we have a total overhaul now.

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

 

Its not only a good thing, but totally necessary as of now.

Also, from what I have read, sprint was trying to conserve cash for something like NV before they knew what they were going to call it. They did not want to work on towers and then have to tear it down and replace it, and they wanted to make sure that plans included LTE. I am happy to see sprint with a clear and good plan to address their problems and set themselves up for the future, but I will say that they should have done the 'band-aid' fixes a year ago, as NV will be coming to those sites within a year.

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Its not only a good thing, but totally necessary as of now.

Also, from what I have read, sprint was trying to conserve cash for something like NV before they knew what they were going to call it. They did not want to work on towers and then have to tear it down and replace it, and they wanted to make sure that plans included LTE. I am happy to see sprint with a clear and good plan to address their problems and set themselves up for the future, but I will say that they should have done the 'band-aid' fixes a year ago, as NV will be coming to those sites within a year.

 

And when you consider that Sprint thought it was going to be able to offload a lot of their data tonnage onto the WiMax network, and did not see data usage to grow by double its most liberal projections, it doesn't seem like such a bad idea for Sprint to try to plan to coast into Network Vision.

 

Now with the luxury of hindsight, we can see that Clearwire stalled on the WiMax deployment and data usage exceeded all estimates, the EVO was a larger success than projected and then add the iPhone to the mix, we can see that it was a bad call. And it probably cost Sprint more in lost subscribers than it did in capex costs. Thankfully, that bad decision is over and they are on to much better decisions now.

 

Robert

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