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What will make 3G speeds increase more?

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So network vision is going to bring LTE and an enhanced 3G network. Which will help the abysmal 3G speeds more, offloading some power users to LTE? Or the network enhancements?

 

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The network enhancements... mainly on the backhaul. Though I still have my doubts. Data traffic doubles every year so I am worried about whether or not Sprint can keep up with the growth in the face of financial challenges. It is too bad the Lightsquared deal fell apart. That would have provided a much needed revenue stream.

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There still my be some hope with some pointing to Sprint/T-Mobile going in together for LTE (See wall post). If it becomes reality. the extra revenue would help Sprint and taking congesting off CDMA and spreading it on LTE would help us.

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I just hope Sprint doesn't skew the upgrades mostly towards LTE for marketing reasons at the expense of achieving really good 3G over their entire footprint. I can't think of anything I care to do on my phone that doesn't work perfectly well with consistent 1 Mbps download speed. Given the paucity of LTE devices in the near term and their battery life issues, I'll take solid 3G over spotty 4G for the time being.

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The same upgraded backhaul that's going to be serving the LTE at every Network Vision site will also be serving the 3G EVDO network. Otherwise, the LTE network would perform at the same speeds as the EVDO is now at your cell site.

 

Backhaul is the problem affecting 80%+ of the cell sites suffering from data speeds. If your speeds went up temporarily where you live when they added T1's, then backhaul is your problem. Otherwise, the additional T1's would not have helped at all. Sprint does have capacity issues. However, this is more of a problem in primary markets where they have too many active users per cell.

 

- Robert

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By the time that network vision is done Im pretty sure that most of us will be on LTE devices and 3g speeds wont matter to us. Just those people that refuse to upgrade their phones.

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By the time that network vision is done Im pretty sure that most of us will be on LTE devices and 3g speeds wont matter to us. Just those people that refuse to upgrade their phones.

 

And when the LTE network crashes, should Sprint suffer the same problems Verizon has on their LTE network.

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Although NV should solve both sides of the issue, back haul is the culprit. If done correctly, everything will work right and all the LTE fiends will be injecting themselves with doses of LTE, while the common person will have good 3G speeds. A win/win for everyone.

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And when the LTE network crashes, should Sprint suffer the same problems Verizon has on their LTE network.

 

That's a Verizon problem there. Whatever they do seems to always involve network outages in large places....Sprint seems to hold theirs up more constantly than VZ does. Least that's the impression I've gotten over the past 10+ yrs I've been with them. Hardly ever hear of a Sprint outage least not as often as you do VZ...

 

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I just hope Sprint doesn't skew the upgrades mostly towards LTE for marketing reasons at the expense of achieving really good 3G over their entire footprint. I can't think of anything I care to do on my phone that doesn't work perfectly well with consistent 1 Mbps download speed. Given the paucity of LTE devices in the near term and their battery life issues, I'll take solid 3G over spotty 4G for the time being.

 

Regarding poor battery life of LTE devices, Qualcomm's new S4 chip has LTE built-in and will begin to usher in the era of power efficient LTE devices

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By the time that network vision is done Im pretty sure that most of us will be on LTE devices and 3g speeds wont matter to us. Just those people that refuse to upgrade their phones.

 

Well yes, but improved 3G will matter a lot to anyone in the early NV markets who upgraded within the last year, especially in non-Wimax areas. That's a lot of people.

Edited by JPSmith
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That's a Verizon problem there. Whatever they do seems to always involve network outages in large places....Sprint seems to hold theirs up more constantly than VZ does. Least that's the impression I've gotten over the past 10+ yrs I've been with them. Hardly ever hear of a Sprint outage least not as often as you do VZ...

 

Sent from my PG86100 using Tapatalk

 

Speaking of which, VZ's LTE went down again today. http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/22/verizon-4g-lte-outage-hitting-parts-of-the-us/

 

And I agree, I cant remember ever experiencing an interruption in service on Sprint.

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It has been reported that Sprint will implement DO Advanced with Network Vision. DO Advanced was originally designed to work on top of EVDO Rev. B, but it appears that Qualcomm has extended the technology to work with Rev. A also. What this technology does is it allows the network to move users to adjacent cells or sectors or even allow them to pull data from two adjacent sectors simultaneously. Right now, the only thing the towers can control is what channel you're on in that sector, or in the case of 1xRTT, they can also control the power level on your phone's output when you're close to the tower to reduce the noise floor for other users. Until DO Advanced, the network couldn't move your connection to a different sector or tower-- the handset always controls the tower connection and handoff in the CDMA world, which is part of the reason why dropped calls are rare. DO Advanced will soon allow the network to switch your connection to a less-loaded sector or tower, which will improve overall network performance.

Edited by 4ringsnbr
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It has been reported that Sprint will implement DO Advanced with Network Vision. DO Advanced was originally designed to work on top of EVDO Rev. B, but it appears that Qualcomm has extended the technology to work with Rev. A also. What this technology does is it allows the network to move users to adjacent cells or sectors or even allow them to pull data from two adjacent sectors simultaneously. Right now, the only thing the towers can control is what channel you're on in that sector, or in the case of 1xRTT, they can also control the power level on your phone's output when you're close to the tower to reduce the noise floor for other users. Until DO Advanced, the network couldn't move your connection to a different sector or tower-- the handset always controls the tower connection and handoff in the CDMA world, which is part of the reason why dropped calls are rare. DO Advanced will soon allow the network to switch your connection to a less-loaded sector or tower, which will improve overall network performance.

 

It always made sense to me that Sprint should deploy DO-Advanced when upgrading NV because unlike Rev A or B which are focused on multi-carrier and speed, the DO-Advanced software is more of an network efficiency and maintenance upgrade to allow congested EVDO sites to offload traffic to nearby EVDO sites to create a balanced traffic load on towers. I really hope this is true and if so, I believe that Sprint will be the only carrier to implement DO-Advanced in the US.

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It always made sense to me that Sprint should deploy DO-Advanced when upgrading NV because unlike Rev A or B which are focused on multi-carrier and speed, the DO-Advanced software is more of an network efficiency and maintenance upgrade to allow congested EVDO sites to offload traffic to nearby EVDO sites to create a balanced traffic load on towers. I really hope this is true and if so, I believe that Sprint will be the only carrier to implement DO-Advanced in the US.

 

I remembered hearing Sprint Engineering & Development VP Iyad Tarazi once say they were moving to DO Advanced in Network Vision on one of the conference calls I sat on. Now I finally found a link confirming it... http://connectedplan...hone-data-1025/

 

Also, here is a brief and simple DO Advanced page from Qualcomm... http://www.qualcomm....ies/do-advanced

 

 

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Everytime I see a product release statement that says, "it will help with exisiting devices, but new upgraded devices will be helped more," I pretty much know I will never see any real world improvements.

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Will this bring Simultaneous voice and data similar to AT&T Network?

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Will this bring Simultaneous voice and data similar to AT&T Network?

 

in short no.

 

simultaneous voice and data will be done via SVDO which is a feature required in the handset itself. The Verizon Thunderbolt supports this last I checked and does so through a qualcomm MDM chip(MDM9600 i believe). Do-advanced doesn't have anything to do with it from what I understand.

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in short no.

 

simultaneous voice and data will be done via SVDO which is a feature required in the handset itself. The Verizon Thunderbolt supports this last I checked and does so through a qualcomm MDM chip(MDM9600 i believe). Do-advanced doesn't have anything to do with it from what I understand.

 

True. But I am expecting more SVDO handsets from Sprint this year. With all these antennas these new devices will have it shouldn't be a big deal at all. We will know soon enough.

 

Posted via Forum Runner

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True. But I am expecting more SVDO handsets from Sprint this year. With all these antennas these new devices will have it shouldn't be a big deal at all. We will know soon enough.

 

Posted via Forum Runner

 

The LG Viper (LS-840) was tested for SVDO and SVLTE, so it will be capable. There are only 2 existing phones that do SVDO: The HTC Thunderbolt and the HTC Rezound. The way they do it is the same: the 1x baseband is the built-in radio in their SoC chip (the MSM snapdragon processor); the EV baseband on both is handled by the MDM9600 (which also does LTE on the same chip). The number of antennas is totally immaterial: you MUST have two CDMA basebands to support SVDO. Judging by this, one could assume that the Viper will use a Qualcomm SoC processor (for the built-in 1x baseband) AND an LTE baseband that also does EVDO, unless there is some new dual-baseband (dual-CDMA baseband) chip out there now.

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The LG Viper (LS-840) was tested for SVDO and SVLTE, so it will be capable. There are only 2 existing phones that do SVDO: The HTC Thunderbolt and the HTC Rezound. The way they do it is the same: the 1x baseband is the built-in radio in their SoC chip (the MSM snapdragon processor); the EV baseband on both is handled by the MDM9600 (which also does LTE on the same chip). The number of antennas is totally immaterial: you MUST have two CDMA basebands to support SVDO. Judging by this, one could assume that the Viper will use a Qualcomm SoC processor (for the built-in 1x baseband) AND an LTE baseband that also does EVDO, unless there is some new dual-baseband (dual-CDMA baseband) chip out there now.

 

Thank you for the clarification. I'm hoping for several devices coming out this year so the dual use critics can stuff it. :)

 

For me, I wouldn't use SVDO while I'm barreling down a highway at 75mph. I only use voice and data together when I'm on WiFi (and then again, only occasionally). So I've not had a problem with the lack of SVDO, myself.

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Thank you for the clarification. I'm hoping for several devices coming out this year so the dual use critics can stuff it. :)

 

For me, I wouldn't use SVDO while I'm barreling down a highway at 75mph. I only use voice and data together when I'm on WiFi (and then again, only occasionally). So I've not had a problem with the lack of SVDO, myself.

It only affects me when I'm at the office and if I'm on my phone and have some need to use data -- I think it's a very rare situation. My phone's lack of SVDO isn't an issue because my battery is big enough so I can keep LTE on all day and LTE will always stay active while on the phone (SVLTE is always there for LTE phones). However, any other LTE phone may not have enough battery to keep LTE active except when needed. After a few complete charge cycles, my average is up to around 48-50 hours per charge (with LTE on the whole time).

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It only affects me when I'm at the office and if I'm on my phone and have some need to use data -- I think it's a very rare situation. My phone's lack of SVDO isn't an issue because my battery is big enough so I can keep LTE on all day and LTE will always stay active while on the phone (SVLTE is always there for LTE phones). However, any other LTE phone may not have enough battery to keep LTE active except when needed. After a few complete charge cycles, my average is up to around 48-50 hours per charge (with LTE on the whole time).

 

That's another great point. You can run WiMax and LTE simultaneously with voice. And of course, WiFi. It's just EVDO and 1x data.

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For me, I wouldn't use SVDO while I'm barreling down a highway at 75mph.

 

The 75 mph thing may be an SVDO selling point. I know EVDO has no problems being used while moving up to 80 mph or more; however, LTE in its original design was set to work only when moving up to like 15 km/h. Something about the OFDM phase / doppler shift with the subcarriers-- I'd have to re-read the white paper one night when I'm suffering from insomnia. I think there were proposed enhancements to remove this limitation, but if they haven't happened yet, we might all be on 3G while moving around. I personally have never tried to use my LTE while in motion, but next time I'm the passenger in the car for a change, I'll give it a go.

Edited by 4ringsnbr

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