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Do you know Sprint iPhone 4s is 4G


coloradosprings
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Last May I decided to travel to London so I called sprint to Unlock my iPhone 4S (international) they didn't mind. So I bought Vodafone sim card from London and I start using it over there (3G) only.

 

When I went back to the states I left Vodafone in my phone honestly I didn't find anything to take the sim card out so I can use sprint. so I took a bus from Chicago to Milwaukee then I noticed my iPhone roaming with ATT with (4G) and I did download test it was between 4-5 mg.

 

So the GSM part of Sprint iPhone support 4G for sure, So I decided to try it again, I bought GEVEY Ultra S to unlock it, you need to jailbreak it so you can unlock it,

 

It works great with AT&T 4G speed!

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It works with hspa+ I believe, which is att and tmobile 4g. Although att is switching to lte now as their official 4g.

The iPhone doesn't support AWS bands(which TMO's 3G/4G is build on), but some areas are becoming compatible with the iPhone since they started deploying 3G/4G on iPhone-supported bands.

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Nope. By no universally accepted standard is any iPhone "4G." The iPhone 4S supports W-CDMA Release 5, Category 10 -- HSPA 14. That is not even HSPA+ 21 or 42, which some call "4G" but I do not. "4G" is fourth generation, and that means an OFDM airlink plus a full IP core. Data speed capability is not the measure of the generation of a wireless network.

 

For a parallel, you can bolt a jet engine onto a Ford Pinto and make it nearly as fast as a jet. But that does not make a Pinto a jet.

 

AJ

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Nope. By no universally accepted standard is any iPhone "4G." The iPhone 4S supports W-CDMA Release 5, Category 10 -- HSPA 14. That is not even HSPA+ 21 or 42, which some call "4G" but I do not. "4G" is fourth generation, and that means an OFDM airlink plus a full IP core. Data speed capability is not the measure of the generation of a wireless network.

 

For a parallel, you can bolt a jet engine onto a Ford Pinto and make it nearly as fast as a jet. But that does not make a Pinto a jet.

 

AJ

 

I'd never heard those specific definitions attributed to 4G before either, I don't think anything in IMT-Advanced requires OFDM and even the connection between IMT-Advanced and the term "4G" is a bit tenuous.

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Last May I decided to travel to London so I called sprint to Unlock my iPhone 4S (international) they didn't mind. So I bought Vodafone sim card from London and I start using it over there (3G) only.

 

When I went back to the states I left Vodafone in my phone honestly I didn't find anything to take the sim card out so I can use sprint. so I took a bus from Chicago to Milwaukee then I noticed my iPhone roaming with ATT with (4G) and I did download test it was between 4-5 mg.

 

So the GSM part of Sprint iPhone support 4G for sure, So I decided to try it again, I bought GEVEY Ultra S to unlock it, you need to jailbreak it so you can unlock it,

 

It works great with AT&T 4G speed!

 

Apple released a software upgrade that literally just turned a 3G icon into a 4G icon so people could say "wow my phone has 4G on AT&T".

 

Nothing actually changed except the little icon. As WiWavelength has just explained, it's not "4G".

 

The biggest issue with AT&T's HPSA network is that the speeds are extremely variable depending on how loaded an area is.

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Apple did this because AT&T leaned on them to do so...and it's annoying that I have to explain to people that the iPhone 4S cannot do actual 4G, no matter what that icon says. As WiWavelength said, the fastest the phone can do is HSPA 14.4 (not H+), which will get you some good download and upload speeds, sure, but 'tain't 4G.

 

What's funny is that a good friend of mine has a 4S here in Fredericksburg, which AT&T shows on their coverage map as 3G (I think due to lack of backhaul; I believe the air interface is H+ but it doesn't matter much because speeds top out at a couple Mbps). He gets the 4G icon on is 4S. If I had an iPad running on AT&T, I wouldn't get the 4G icon on the exact same network...but hey, AT&T is compensating...for a small LTE network :P

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Apple did this because AT&T leaned on them to do so...and it's annoying that I have to explain to people that the iPhone 4S cannot do actual 4G, no matter what that icon says. As WiWavelength said, the fastest the phone can do is HSPA 14.4 (not H+), which will get you some good download and upload speeds, sure, but 'tain't 4G.

 

What's funny is that a good friend of mine has a 4S here in Fredericksburg, which AT&T shows on their coverage map as 3G (I think due to lack of backhaul; I believe the air interface is H+ but it doesn't matter much because speeds top out at a couple Mbps). He gets the 4G icon on is 4S. If I had an iPad running on AT&T, I wouldn't get the 4G icon on the exact same network...but hey, AT&T is compensating...for a small LTE network

 

If it can do 14.4 mbps then that means it's doing 15/16 codes which means it falls under the HSPA+ revision of the specification. Realistically the only difference between that and the 21 mbps speeds are the use of 64QAM and more aggressive error correction, which is only going to be a factor typically at 1/3 cell radius or less.

 

Remember that what people had been calling "real" 4G up until about 18 months ago needed 128QAM in 60+ MHz and nearly no error correction. Nothing currently deploying is even half way to the older more strict usage of the term.

 

 

 

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

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