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Galaxy SIII FCC RF Specs vs. EVO LTE


chappo2000

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Here if the S4GRU "RF focused technical rundown" of the upcoming Samsung Galaxy SIII:

 

Source: http://s4gru.com/ind...aunch-imminent/

 

  • CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800)
  • LTE band 25 (i.e. LTE 1900; PCS A-G blocks)
  • LTE 5 MHz carrier bandwidth
  • LTE UE category 3
  • SVDO and SVLTE support, including SVDO or SVLTE and simultaneous 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi tether
  • Maximum RF ERP: 17.78 dBm (CDMA1X 850), 20.77 dBm (EV-DO 850), 24.05 dBm (CDMA1X 1900), 23.85 dBm (EV-DO 1900), 17.21 dBm (CDMA1X 800), 17.56 dBm (EV-DO 800), 22.01 dBm (LTE 1900)
  • NFC antenna integrated into battery
  • LTE antenna configuration: 1 Tx, 2 Rx (i.e. 2x2 downlink MIMO)

 

 

And, of course, the same S4GRU technical rundown for the HTC Evo 4G LTE:

 

Source: http://s4gru.com/ind...fcc-oet-filing/

  • CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800)
  • LTE band class 25 (i.e. LTE 1900; PCS A-G blocks)
  • LTE 5 MHz and 10 MHz channel bandwidths
  • LTE UE category 3
  • SVDO and SVLTE support, including SVDO or SVLTE and simultaneous 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi tether
  • Maximum RF ERP: 20.43 dBm (CDMA1X 850), 18.74 dBm (EV-DO 850), 22.98 dBm (CDMA1X 1900), 18.44 dBm (EV-DO 1900), 20.01 dBm (CDMA1X 800), 18.75 dBm (EV-DO 800), 19.85 dBm (LTE 1900)
  • Antenna gain: -2 dBi (CDMA1X 850/1900/800), -3.5 dBi (EV-DO 850/1900/800 and LTE 1900)
  • LTE antenna configuration 1x2 (i.e. 2x2 downlink MIMO)

Given this excellent information provided to us by S4GRU... how would you say the Galaxy SII radio set compares to the Evo LTE? Is there any indication that the SIII will have the same radio problems that has seemed to plague prior Sammy devices?

 

Any technical insight into how these numbers compare would be appreciated. I'm ready for upgrade and the choice between the Evo and SIII is a hard one to make. I know it's all about what each specific user is looking for, but a significant difference in the build quality or range of the radios might tip the scales in either direction.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

P.S. Credit to "QWIKSTRIKE" for actually asking this question first.

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They are both using the Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 (dual core at 1.5). The S3 has 2 gig ram, vice HTC 1 gig.

 

This is something I would love to see a good technical answer on how big of a deal the sammy radio's are. Having an Epic 4G and my wife's Epic 4G touch, I really want a radio that works well and GPS that works at all!

 

I've been holding on to my final Sprint Premier Gold upgrade since November. Trying to decide if I should upgrade now or wait till late fall/winter and upgrade to a phone in the next batch.

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I'm willing to take a chance on the Samsung's radios. Yes, it only supports 5x5 LTE (I'll bet it could support 10x10 with a firmware upgrade, though I think it will be awhile before Sprint refarms non-G PCS such that they can do 10x10 channels). However it has a removable battery and as much RAM as the cheapie nettop I bought last summer. That's saying something.

 

Doesn't hurt that I also purchased Beautiful Widgets (so i can get a Sense-like clock) a couple years ago, and I just run LauncherPro on my phones anyway :P

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No sense clock for me either. Too big. I have a clock on the top right already. I like the beautiful widgets 1x4 weather better.

 

But... No Sammy for me. The GPS on the epic burned me bad. The GPS on the EVO LTE is friggin amazing! The flakey Sammy radio stack is also another reason. That thing takes its time to flip from roaming to no roaming. I don't blame the hardware, I firmly believe it was all software issues. And how can you release a phone that can't roam on PCS? Another software bug they failed to fix. Guess I should have steered clear when they released the phone with the upload speeds broken and sprint kept saying nothing was wrong with it. I am sure they were just repeating what Sammy was telling them.

 

 

 

 

Sent from my C64 w/Epyx FastLoad cartridge

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No sense clock for me either. Too big. I have a clock on the top right already. I like the beautiful widgets 1x4 weather better.

 

But... No Sammy for me. The GPS on the epic burned me bad. The GPS on the EVO LTE is friggin amazing! The flakey Sammy radio stack is also another reason. That thing takes its time to flip from roaming to no roaming. I don't blame the hardware, I firmly believe it was all software issues. And how can you release a phone that can't roam on PCS? Another software bug they failed to fix. Guess I should have steered clear when they released the phone with the upload speeds broken and sprint kept saying nothing was wrong with it. I am sure they were just repeating what Sammy was telling them.

 

I noticed the upload speed issue when I first got my Epic. Then I applied the software update and the problem went away.

 

I had GPS issues with the phone, but that was mainly due to running pre-release firmware (e.g. DK28). For the times I've used GPS on the phone recently, it's been fine.

 

I guess I'm also lucky that the roaming I've needed to do on the phone has always been on the cellular band. Go figure.

 

If the SIII ends up having crappy radios, of course I'll take it back and swap it for the Evo, though I'll miss being able to swap batteries when one gets old. I've owned HTC devices before (Mogul, Touch Pro) and they've served me well, with crystal-clear voice quality, etc., and my former roommate's Rezound looks awesome, but there are a few touches on the Samsung (e.g. better camera software) that I want, so I'll try the SIII first :)

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Now where is the RF spec comparison between the Samsung epic and the EVO LTE. I would be very curious to see that one.

 

That would be interesting. I'd look up the FCC docs, but I'm in a lazy mood right now :P

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Here if the S4GRU "RF focused technical rundown" of the upcoming Samsung Galaxy SIII:

 

Source: http://s4gru.com/ind...aunch-imminent/

 

<snipped for brevity>

 

Given this excellent information provided to us by S4GRU... how would you say the Galaxy SII radio set compares to the Evo LTE? Is there any indication that the SIII will have the same radio problems that has seemed to plague prior Sammy devices?

 

Any technical insight into how these numbers compare would be appreciated. I'm ready for upgrade and the choice between the Evo and SIII is a hard one to make. I know it's all about what each specific user is looking for, but a significant difference in the build quality or range of the radios might tip the scales in either direction.

 

Thoughts?

 

As mentioned in the article linked first, those numbers suggest that the SGS3 has a slight edge in transmitting power.

 

The 10 MHz carrier bandwidth, also as mentioned in the article, isn't something that they expect Sprint to deploy during the life of the handsets, so it's basically a don't care.

 

Neither souce link mentioned receiver sensitivity, the other half of the transmit/receive story, so I think what's there is necessary but not sufficient information to decide which radios are going perform better.

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Neither souce link mentioned receiver sensitivity, the other half of the transmit/receive story, so I think what's there is necessary but not sufficient information to decide which radios are going perform better.

 

And absent tens of thousands of dollars worth of RF test equipment, we will probably never be privy to receiver sensitivity, unfortunately. The FCC requires transmitters be tested (conducted power, radiated power, spurious emissions, etc.) because the FCC has to ensure that authorized devices do not cause undue interference. The FCC does not require receivers be tested, as receivers do not cause interference yet must accept any interference from other transmitters.

 

AJ

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I was curious (as a former Epic user), so I looked it up.

 

Tx Frequency Range: 824.70 - 848.31 MHz (Cell. CDMA) / 1851.25 - 1908.75 MHz (PCS CDMA)

Max. RF Output Power: 0.288 W ERP Cell. CDMA (24.6 dBm), 0.295 W EIRP PCS CDMA (24.7 dBm)

 

 

I also looked up the info for my current Photon.

 

Tx Frequency Range: 824.70 - 848.31 MHz (Cell. CDMA) / 1851.25 - 1908.75 MHz (PCS CDMA)

Max. RF Output Power: 0.187 W ERP Cell. CDMA (22.71 dBm), 1.297 W EIRP PCS CDMA (31.13 dBm)

 

I dunno what any of it means tho :blink:

Edited by Jaggrey
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I also have a question -- will the SIII be "world phone" as the V's version? :) I rather liked the ability to pop in other operator's SIM while travelling with my Photon and would love to do the same on SIII

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