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(UPDATED) Samsung Galaxy S3 passes FCC muster, launch imminent?

WiWavelength

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by Andrew J. Shepherd
Sprint 4G Rollout Updates
Friday, June 1, 2012 - 11:58 PM MDT

 

Update: Sprint has scheduled an exclusive Samsung event for the evening of June 12 in Boston. It looks like the Samsung Galaxy S3 coming out party has been set.

 

Just as the HTC EVO 4G LTE is setting up for its delayed national street date tomorrow June 2, it may sooner than expected be getting another high profile cousin in Sprint's burgeoning line up of Network Vision ready, LTE capable devices.

First, word leaked this afternoon that Sprint is prepping landing and pre-order web pages for its version of the Samsung Galaxy S3. Then, this evening, S4GRU uncovered the Samsung SPH-L710 (aka Galaxy S3) exhibits that had hit the FCC OET (Office of Engineering and Technology) database earlier today. So, the ball seems to be rolling toward an imminent launch for the Galaxy S3. And, as we did with the EVO 4G LTE a few weeks back, here is an RF focused technical rundown of the upcoming Samsung flagship Sprint handset:

  • CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800)
  • LTE band 25 (i.e. LTE 1900; PCS A-G blocks)
  • LTE 5 MHz carrier bandwidth
  • LTE UE category 3
  • SVDO and SVLTE support, including SVDO or SVLTE and simultaneous 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi tether
  • Maximum RF ERP: 17.78 dBm (CDMA1X 850), 20.77 dBm (EV-DO 850), 24.05 dBm (CDMA1X 1900), 23.85 dBm (EV-DO 1900), 17.21 dBm (CDMA1X 800), 17.56 dBm (EV-DO 800), 22.01 dBm (LTE 1900)
  • NFC antenna integrated into battery
  • LTE antenna configuration: 1 Tx, 2 Rx (i.e. 2x2 downlink MIMO)

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All in all, the Galaxy S3 does not present any really big technical surprises. As RF capabilities go, it follows very closely in the footsteps of the EVO 4G LTE. One of the few notable differences is that the Galaxy S3, like its Galaxy Nexus sibling, supports only 5 MHz x 5 MHz LTE carriers, while the EVO 4G LTE can do both 5 MHz x 5 MHz and 10 MHz x 10 MHz LTE bandwidths. However, Sprint has no definite plans to deploy 10 MHz x 10 MHz LTE during the typical lifespan of either of these handsets. And, otherwise, the Galaxy S3 does appear to have the general edge in RF transmit power.

 

Sources: FCC, Inside Sprint Now

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Will this have HD Voice capability like the Evo 4G LTE?

 

I know this is something I want to know!

 

Robert

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You would think that this would get mentioned in the press release if it was going to have it but hey it would not be the first time they overlooked something either!

 

The real question is who is returning there EVO for the S3?

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I would also like to know if the US versions will still have the Wolfson DAC I keep hearing so much about.

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I wonder if this is significant? How much of a hit will the performance take because of the difference in CPUs?

 

http://www.popherald.com/galaxy-s-3-release-date-price-watch-17515/

 

"In Europe and Asia, the Samsung Galaxy S3 is powered by quad-core Exynos chip, the company’s newest chipset that offers buttery smooth user interface and better application support. But here in United States, the S3 variants are expected to ship with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon S4 CPU due to LTE and HSPA+ compatibility issues. Either way, the S4 Krait and the Exynos chips are both “screamers” that will show Android’s latest development."

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Does Google Maps require a 4/3G or LTE to run on either the GSI or HTC? If I am out of Sprint range will Maps work?

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Does Google Maps require a 4/3G or LTE to run on either the GSI or HTC? If I am out of Sprint range will Maps work?

 

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking. However, on a Sprint device you will need to have a 3G, 4G, LTE or WiFi connection to run Google Maps. You can also sort of use it with a 1x connection, but results vary wildly. Especially with Google Maps Navigation.

 

In the case of you losing signal because you travel out of coverage, newer version of Google Maps may still work if your device cached the maps in advance it would need when going into a no coverage area and you do not change your route.

 

I recently had a three hour trip here in New Mexico where I used Google Maps Navigation and drove in and out of coverage. At one point I was out of coverage for over an hour and still was able to use Navigation. Since the device already plotted my whole route in advance, it knew which maps to get for me in advance.

 

So when I traveled out of coverage, it kept getting info from the GPS radio and updating my course on the maps it downloaded. However, if I deviated my route any, it would not have the maps on the new route in the non coverage area. Worked pretty good.

 

I hope this answers your question.

 

Robert

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Does Google Maps require a 4/3G or LTE to run on either the GSI or HTC? If I am out of Sprint range will Maps work?

 

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking. However, on a Sprint device you will need to have a 3G, 4G, LTE or WiFi connection to run Google Maps. You can also sort of use it with a 1x connection, but results vary wildly. Especially with Google Maps Navigation.In the case of you losing signal because you travel out of coverage, newer version of Google Maps may still work if your device cached the maps in advance it would need when going into a no coverage area and you do not change your route.I recently had a three hour trip here in New Mexico where I used Google Maps Navigation and drove in and out of coverage. At one point I was out of coverage for over an hour and still was able to use Navigation. Since the device already plotted my whole route in advance, it knew which maps to get for me in advance. So when I traveled out of coverage, it kept getting info from the GPS radio and updating my course on the maps it downloaded. However, if I deviated my route any, it would not have the maps on the new route in the non coverage area. Worked pretty good.I hope this answers your question.Robert

 

There are apps like navigon, and maverick that use a predownloaded map file for what state you are traveling to. I posted a blurb about copilot here http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/271-copilot-app-gives-free-offline-maps-for-navigating-off-the-beaten-path/page__hl__navigation__fromsearch__1 which uses maps predownloaded to the phone.

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