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MacinJosh

S4GRU Staff
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Everything posted by MacinJosh

  1. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    I've noticed that plus my Franklin R910 has had a worse time reconnecting to LTE in the last 2 weeks as well. It's been crazy. Drives me nuts. What is ORNL?
  2. I replaced my WiFi Connect router with the ASUS RT-AC1750, which is basically the AC66U-B1. Added benefit is the included USB 3.0 port.
  3. MacinJosh

    Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 7.0 for Sprint

    by Josh McDaniel Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Sunday, August 25, 2013 - 2:30 AM MDT On August 21, Samsung received approval from the FCC OET (Office of Engineering and Technology) for a Sprint variant of the Galaxy Tab 3 7.0, model number SM-T217S (Wi-Fi versions of the Galaxy Tab 3 7.0 are SM-T210 & SM-T211). According to the FCC authorization docs, the Galaxy Tab has a dual core 1.7 GHz processor and may come in a 16 GB storage size if the picture on the FCC label page is accurate. Specs for the Wi-Fi only version are 3 MP rear camera with a 1.3 MP front facing camera, 1 GB RAM, up to 64 GB of microSD storage, and 7” screen with 1024 x 600 display. (All specs are subject to change before official release, as the processor on the Wi-Fi only model is 1.2 GHz dual core and it only comes with 8 GB storage.) Here is the antenna diagram: CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800) LTE band 25 (i.e. LTE 1900; PCS A-G blocks) LTE 3, 5, 10 MHz FDD channel bandwidths 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi with hotspot mode on 2.4 GHz only (LTE, EV-DO, and CDMA1X) Maximum RF ERP/EIRP: 22.10 dBm (CDMA 850), 27.11 dBm (CDMA 1900), 24.96 dBm (CDMA 800), 28.30 dBm (LTE 1900, 5MHz FDD with QPSK), 27.20 dBm (LTE 1900, 5MHz FDD with 16QAM) Although this tablet has a fairly strong uplink LTE EIRP, it is pretty weak on specs with only a dual core processor, 1 GB RAM, low screen resolution, and only single band LTE. For these reasons, this Galaxy Tab should be a budget device. Source: FCC
  4. by Josh McDaniel Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Friday, January 31, 2014 This year is shaping up to be an interesting one for Sprint handsets. In 2012, 15 LTE devices were released on the then brand new Sprint LTE 1900 network, while last year saw a 100 percent increase to 30 devices. And this year could be just as big of a year as last. So, what better way to start 2014 off right than with a tri-band LTE phone? We present S4GRU's first FCC OET authorization article of 2014, the LG LS740, a midrange LG tri-band LTE handset not yet announced but presumably headed to Sprint. RF stats are pretty high for a midrange device, as you can see below. CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800) LTE bands 25, 26, 41 (i.e. LTE 1900/800, TD-LTE 2600) band 25 LTE 3/5/10 MHz FDD carrier bandwidth band 26 LTE 1.4/3/5/10 MHz FDD carrier bandwidth band 41 LTE 10/15/20 MHz TDD carrier bandwidth LTE UE category 4 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi 802.11n MCS index 7 (single spatial stream, 20 MHz carrier bandwidth, 400 ns guard interval) SVDO and SVLTE support absent RF ERP/EIRP maximum: 22.121 dBm (CDMA1X 800), 21.081-22.621 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 850), 23.14 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 1900), 25.06-26.82 dBm (LTE 1900), 22.901-25.211 dBm (LTE 800), 24.9-26.29 dBm (TD-LTE 2600) NFC Antenna locations: notably absent from this article as LG has an on again/off again attitude about when it releases antenna diagrams Simultaneous transmission paths: (see FCC OET diagram below) According to the FCC OET docs and Sprint UA profile, system specs for this device are as follows: Qualcomm MSM8926 (aka Snapdragon 400) 4.7 in screen 540 x 960 screen resolution Android 4.4 KitKat Bluetooth 4.0 2 GB RAM 32 GB ROM microSD slot absent 1.3 MP front camera 8 MP rear camera with full HD (1920 x 1080) video recording sealed battery Expect this device to have a mid to late spring release, and it might be the replacement to the LG F3 (LS720) Sprint released last year. Source: FCC OET, Sprint UA Profile
  5. MacinJosh

    Sprint & T-Mobile Roaming Agreement

    Thanks! I coudn't find that on the allfor5g website when I looked a little bit ago.
  6. MacinJosh

    Sprint & T-Mobile Roaming Agreement

    Do you have a link to the slides? I've been working all day and haven't had a chance to see much.
  7. by Josh McDaniel Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 4:45 PM MDT Samsung and Sprint are planning to re-release the Galaxy S III in a Sprint tri-band LTE edition. According to the Sprint UA profile, the SPH-L710T has mostly the same specs as the original GS3, except the inclusion of tri-band LTE, and an upgrade to Android 4.4.2. Plus, in a nice twist, Samsung didn't make confidential the antenna diagram for this phone, so I include it for your viewing pleasure. Remember, as with all other Sprint tri-band LTE handsets, this phone is not capable of supporting SVLTE because the single transmit path is shared among CDMA1X, EV-DO, and LTE. But the phone is open to be another Sprint Wi-Fi calling capable device based on the fact that Samsung made sure to include this phrase in the simultaneous transmission scenarios section: "Pre-installed VOIP applications are considered." Also included is 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi with support for 40MHz 802.11n carriers. Unfortunately, in hotspot mode, all 5 GHz Wi-Fi is disabled. Source: FCC, Sprint UA Profile
  8. MacinJosh

    LG G2 mini: A Day Late and a Dollar Short?

    by Josh McDaniel Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Friday, June 13, 2014 - 10:59 AM MDT Earlier this year, rumors began circulating that Sprint and LG were going to release the LG G2 mini, a smaller version of the G2. The model number of the phone was even listed as LGLS885. Earlier this week, LG received FCC OET approval for that very model number. But is this phone too late to market, as the release of the LG G3 is rumored to be early this summer? No, it couldn't come at a more perfect time. The phone is to have the following specs (according to the Sprint UA profile): Qualcomm MSM8926 1280 x 720 HD resolution 4.7” screen Android 4.4.2 build LS885Z03 KitKat on board with an update already in the works to build LS885ZV2 (Android 4.4.3?) 1 GB RAM 8 GB internal flash storage 32 GB compatible microSD card slot 8 MP rear camera 1.3 MP front camera The authorization docs indicate the G2 mini to be potentially the first VoLTE capable Sprint phone to pass through the FCC. The key is "potentially." Authorizations for other G2 mini variants also include notation of VoLTE capability, so that may be just boilerplate at this point. Below you will find a screenshot documenting such language. Could this mean that this year's flagships prior to the G2 mini won't get VoLTE? Who knows? They could receive OTA updates, but Samsung and HTC aren't obligated. Of course, being tri-band, this phone isn't SVDO nor SVLTE capable. We remind you of this every time because some still ask if they can talk and surf the Web at the same time on Sprint tri-band LTE phones. No, only on Wi-Fi. However, if VoLTE is enabled for use on the G2 mini, then it could allow voice and data at the same time. But until Sprint clarifies its VoLTE stance, we can't be sure such a feature will be activated any time soon. “QoS” could be the deciding factor. As for RF performance, it appears that LG and Sprint have purposely optimized this phone for TD-LTE on band 41. EIRP levels for band 41 are around 5-7 dB higher than EIRP for band 25 and ERP for band 26. Why is that? One explanation is to help camp users on band 41 as the primary LTE band and use band 25 and band 26 only where band 41 LTE isn’t available. A date for release has not been mentioned, but my personal projection is for the G2 mini to be available before the end of the summer. Sources: FCC OET, Sprint UA Profile
  9. MacinJosh

    LG G3 4G: It's a G thang.

    by Josh McDaniel and Tim Yu Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Thursday, July 31, 2014 - 11:59 PM MDT On June 5, 2014, LG received FCC OET approval for the LG LS990, otherwise known to handset consumers as the Sprint variant LG G3. Then, just two weeks later, on June 19, the device received a Class II Permissive Change filing that appears to show slightly improved radio capabilities. The LG G3 has a strong spec/feature list: Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 MSM8974 Android 4.4.2 KitKat 5.5” QHD display (1440 x 2560 pixel resolution) 3 GB RAM 13 MP back camera 2.1 MP front camera 32 GB internal storage 64 GB microSD support As expected, the FCC docs show that this phone does not support SVDO nor SVLTE, as it is a tri-band, single radio handset. It does include support for Wi-Fi calling. Unfortunately, LG didn’t include the antenna diagram with this flagship, opting to make that diagram a permanently confidential item. Included in the documentation is also the testing certification for QI wireless charging, which has become prevalent on many flagship devices. Though it is not included in the actual retail device, which comes with a standard non wireless charging back cover, a wireless charging cover is apt to be available for retail sales soon after release of the handset. On LTE, the G3 supports the following carrier bandwidths: Band 25 3/5/10 MHz FDD Band 26 1.4/3/5/10 MHz FDD Band 41 10/15/20 MHz TDD Radiated power levels for each LTE band show middle of the road performance, lower than that of some of the mid-range tri-band LTE devices available and/or coming to the market. For review, here is a summary of the radiated power levels: CDMA BC0 (850) 21.03 dBm CDMA BC1 (1900) 23.08 dBm CDMA BC10 (800) 22.75 dBm LTE Band 25 (1900) 21.28 - 22.9 dBm LTE Band 26 (800) 17.49 - 20.51 dBm LTE Band 41 (2500/2600) 20.37 - 22.87 dBm While the publicly available FCC docs do not include the aforementioned antenna diagram, they do divulge the peak antenna gain structures for each of the supported bands/band classes. For best RF performance in an internal antenna flagship smartphone, we expect to see around -4 dBi for below 1 GHz, around 1 dBi for 1-2 GHz, and around 3 dBi for above 2 GHz. In those regards, the LG G3 is a disappointment, and that may account for its middling radiated power levels. For reference, below is the peak antenna gain table: But as always these don't show the whole story as some devices that show higher power level actually perform worse than those which show lower power levels. It varies by device but it is an unknown until users run thorough tests against the previous LG G2 flagship and other flagships (Samsung Galaxy S5, HTC One M8, etc.). The LG G3 was announced to be in stores starting July 18, 2014, but in a surprise move by Sprint, it was launched July 11, the same day that AT&T launched its LG G3 variant. Sources: Android Authority Phone Arena FCC OET FCC OET C2PC
  10. by Josh McDaniel Sprint 4G Rollout Updates Friday, September 11, 2015 - 9:45 AM MDT As most of nearly the entire world is aware, Apple announced the iPhone 6S, 6S Plus, and a number of other devices earlier this week. Most notably, iPhone 6S/6S Plus debuts 3D Touch, which is an enhanced version of Force Touch on Apple Watch. However, for most S4GRU readers here, there was one burning question that was not answered in the keynote. As iPhone models have progressed on Sprint from the iPhone 5 in 2012 with Band 25 LTE to the iPhone 5S in 2013 with dual Band 25/26 LTE to the iPhone 6 in 2014 with Triband 25/26/41 LTE, Apple has oft been half to a full generation behind in supporting the latest Network Vision enhancements. Last year's iPhone 6, for example, did feature the inclusion of Band 41 LTE but not quite full compatibility with CCA/RRPP bands. And Band 41 LTE 2x CA on Android handsets was just a few months around the corner. Well, this year's iPhone 6S includes Band 12 LTE for full CCA/RRPP support and Band 41 LTE 2x CA on Sprint! Now the latest iPhone is fully up to date with all Sprint bands and current technology initiatives that are currently released. Notable Specs & Sprint Interband 2x Carrier Aggregation Yes, that's right, iPhone users now get to enjoy 2x Carrier Aggregation on the Sprint network! This will lead to a doubling in B41 performance in Sprint Spark markets that have CA deployed. Up to 150Mbps in the most ideal signal and network conditions. All you wireless enthusiasts who want to know about radio performance, read further for RF testing information. The rest of the notable specs on the new phones are listed below: A9 processor 2 GB RAM (just like iPad Air 2) 12 MP iSight (rear) camera with 4K video recording 5 MP FaceTime camera with Retina Flash and 720p video recording 7000 Series aluminum body Rose Gold color option Only 1/10 of a cm taller, wider, and thicker than last year's iPhone 6/6 Plus And now for an RF testing sidebar from S4GRU's technical editor... As always, the usual caveats about lab testing versus real world performance and uplink versus downlink apply. The figures represent my best averaged and rounded estimates of maximum uplink ERP/EIRP test results provided to the FCC OET (Office of Engineering and Technology) in the authorization filings for the device(s). These ERP/EIRP figures are specific to the A1688 and A1687 models, which are the Qualcomm Snapdragon X7 LTE (MDM9635) Category 6 and CDMA2000 equipped iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus, respectively. Separate Band 30 enabled models exist for AT&T, and while those models are disclosed to use the same antenna arrays, they were RF tested separately in the authorization filings, thus may possess different ERP/EIRP figures. So, this data and analysis should not be extrapolated to cover any other iPhone 6S models. Since this article covers two different iPhone 6S models with two different antennas each, I have put together a table for easier viewing and comparison. (Click to Enlarge) To provide further analysis, the green shaded cells represent the maximum figures for each LTE band across both handsets and both antennas. As we can see, the LAT -- with one or two possibly anomalous exceptions -- is the primary antenna on both handsets, possessing greater maximum ERP/EIRP and/or higher maximum antenna gain. Both iPhone 6S sizes look to be at least good to possibly great LTE performers -- especially in their high band output. For the uninitiated, 30 dBm equals a full 1 W. Mid band is good, and low band is at least average. Hopefully, this expected solid LTE performance plays out in the real world and is not compromised by carrier bundle firmware, as some S4GRU users have reported previously. For a comparison of the two sizes, bigger, apparently, is not always better for RF. Somewhat of a surprise, the smaller iPhone 6S is the superior RF performer of the two. It generally has greater maximum ERP/EIRP and higher antenna gain -- as evidenced by the greater number of green shaded cells. Moreover, the LAT to UAT consistency is much better on the iPhone 6S, with relatively less drop off between the two antennas and always higher UAT maximum ERP/EIRP than that of the iPhone 6S Plus. This means the RF "death grip" loss on the iPhone 6S could be much smaller when it has to shift between LAT and UAT. And now for the best part, you could win a new iPhone 6S... S4GRU is in currently in the throes of a Start of Autumn Promotion to help raise money for the site. We are currently planning to raffle off a new iPhone 6S to one lucky winner who donates a minimum of $10 to support the site. All donations go toward S4GRU Sponsor status and future upgrades. However, S4GRU Membership is not required. Click on this link for more details. It's a Win-Win-Win for everyone! You get to support the leading Sprint/Wireless Enthusiast site on the internet, you get a chance to win a brand new iPhone 6S and your donations count toward Sponsor membership upgrades. Support S4GRU today!
  11. MacinJosh

    Happy birthday

    Happy Birthday Robert!
  12. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    I don't have AirPods yet. Don't have the extra funds to do so at this time.
  13. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    I love the OLED too. Definitely a nice screen.
  14. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    Well, I'm still setting up my phone, but so far, I love it.
  15. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    Well, I did it. I ordered an iPhone X from Best Buy this afternoon. I'll have it by Friday. I'm excited.
  16. Model: Apple A1688 (iPhone 6S) / A1687 (iPhone 6S Plus) Processor: A9 chip with 64-bit architecture Display: Retina HD display 4.7 inches / 1334 x 750 / 326 PPI (iPhone 6S) 5.5 inches / 1920 x 1080 / 401 PPI (iPhone 6S Plus) Cellular Bands: CDMA EV-DO Rev. A (800, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz) UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1700/2100, 1900, 2100 MHz) TD-SCDMA 1900 (F), 2000 (A) GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz) FDD-LTE (Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29) TD-LTE (Bands 38, 39, 40, 41) Wireless: 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi with MIMO Bluetooth 4.2 wireless technology NFC Battery life: iPhone 6S Up to 14 hours 3G talk time Up to 10 hours 3G or LTE internet usage Up to 11 hours WiFi internet usage Up to 10 days standby time iPhone 6S Plus Up to 24 hours 3G talk time Up to 12 hours 3G, LTE, or WiFi internet usage Up to 16 days standby time Notes: Sprint Band 41 Carrier Aggregation Full Sprint RRPP capability Wi-Fi calling No Sprint VoLTE capabilities No SVLTE (Spark devices don't support SVLTE)
  17. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    Works great for me
  18. MacinJosh

    Apple Watch Poor LTE Performance

    I haven't experienced any issues yet, but then again I've only used my Watch for one call, and that was in an area where I get decent LTE.
  19. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    Hopefully soon. Although since 11.2, my phone has a harder time staying connected to my WiFi Connect router in right outside my bedroom than it used to. It appears whatever is affecting WiFi Calling has affected my WiFi in general.
  20. MacinJosh

    Apple Watch Poor LTE Performance

    On Wednesday I contacted a friend at a Sprint store in Vegas and asked if they had the Series 3 Nike+ model in stock. Well, they did. I wasn't able to get in that day, but the next morning, they still had it in stock. So Thursday about 4pm I got it. I am a happy person! Now most likely I don't get LTE at my house, but as long as I get it in town, I'm happy. I may or may not keep the cellular plan, but I a little while to decide.
  21. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    ##873283#
  22. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    Weird. I turned it back on and it's not working at all for me at the moment. Update: I did a service update, and it's back up and running.
  23. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    It's certainly a weird and wacky issue, that's for sure.
  24. MacinJosh

    iPhone 8, 8+, X announced

    It's quite sporadic for me. Part of the day it works, and even that is hit and miss. And I'm on the 7 Plus.
  25. On September 7, Apple released the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. With it's A10 Fusion Quad-core processor and 2GB or 3GB RAM (7 or 7 Plus respectively), it's an extremely powerful smartphone. Fortunately for Sprint users, the 7 & 7 Plus include all of Sprint's LTE bands including 3xCA downlink on Band 41. Also included is 2xCA uplink on Band 41, yet Sprint has not announced any plans to release uplink Carrier Aggregation on Band 41 yet. Hopefully soon. LTE Bands included are: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 38, 39, 40, 41
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