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(UPDATED) All for HTC One, HTC One for all?

Posted by WiWavelength, in Author: Andrew J. Shepherd 22 February 2013 · 35,469 views

Sprint HTC One FCC OET
(UPDATED) All for HTC One, HTC One for all? by Andrew J. Shepherd
Sprint 4G Rollout Updates

Friday, February 22, 2013 - 2:55 PM MST


Update:  Many hands on reviews of the HTC One are emerging this week.  Courtesy of Engadget, we can report that the Sprint variant is one of the very first Sprint LTE handsets to include a removable micro-SIM.  Removable SIM cards have long been part of the Network Vision roadmap for 2013, so it looks like that time may have arrived.

S4GRU welcomes you to the first major Sprint handset announcement of 2013.  Earlier this week, the upcoming HTC One was revealed at an event in New York City.  Not to be confused with last year's HTC One X, the HTC One is the new flagship of the line and will be offered by dozens of carriers around the world, including AT&T and T-Mobile in the US.  Last year, Sprint got essentially a customized version of the HTC One X in the HTC EVO 4G LTE.  This year, however, another EVO handset is not currently in the offing, and Sprint is joining its fellow carriers in standardizing around a universal HTC One platform.  The only notable customization is for Sprint's specific CDMA2000 band classes and LTE band.  And that Sprint variant had its authorization documents uploaded to the FCC OET (Office of Engineering and Technology) database earlier today.

If you have followed our series of articles on the EVO LTE, Samsung Galaxy S3, Motorola Photon Q 4G, LG Optimus G, and Samsung Galaxy Note 2, then you know what is at hand.  Here is an RF focused breakdown of the HTC One coming to Sprint:
  • CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800)
  • LTE band class 25 (i.e. LTE 1900; PCS A-G blocks)
  • LTE 5/10 MHz FDD carrier bandwidth
  • LTE UE category 3
  • 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi
  • 802.11n MCS index 7, 40 MHz carrier bandwidth
  • 802.11ac MCS index 9, 80 MHz carrier bandwidth
  • SVLTE support, including SVLTE and simultaneous 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi tether
  • NFC
  • Antenna 0 max RF ERP/EIRP: 20.10 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 850), 23.80 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 1900), 19.23 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 800), 12.30 dBm (LTE 1900)
  • Antenna 1 max RF ERP/EIRP: 13.78 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 850), 13.58 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 1900), 14.27 dBm (CDMA1X/EV-DO 800), 23.63 dBm (LTE 1900)
  • Antenna locations: (see FCC OET diagram below)
  • Simultaneous transmission modes: (see FCC OET diagram below)
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As for analysis of the specs, the HTC One is the world's first handset to include the new 802.11ac Wi-Fi standard.  But let us address right away another potential first that has become the so called elephant in the room.  The Sprint version of the HTC One is limited to band 25 LTE 1900.  It does not support either of Sprint's upcoming LTE bands -- band 26 LTE 800 and band 41 TD-LTE 2600.  One or both of those bands are expected to be incorporated in new handsets sometime this year, but the HTC One will not be the first.

The other notable absence is SVDO support for simultaneous CDMA1X voice + EV-DO data, though its omission is growing less and less notable as time goes on.  SVDO requires separate RF paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO.  The first few Sprint LTE handsets did support SVDO, utilizing separate paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO/LTE.  But the last nine Sprint LTE handsets have foregone SVDO, combining CDMA1X/EV-DO on a single path, so SVDO was likely just a temporary measure or a fringe benefit of the Qualcomm MSM8960 chipset and will not be a common Sprint handset feature going forward.

In its press release earlier this week, Sprint calls its HTC One an "international" smartphone, and that could be interpreted to mean world roaming capabilities.  The FCC authorization documents show no evidence of this, but they are not required to do so, since the FCC is a US authority.  What is lacking, though, is any GSM 850/1900 or W-CDMA 850/1900.  So, if the HTC One is world roaming capable, it will most likely be limited to GSM 900/1800 and band 1 W-CDMA 2100+1900.

Since the HTC One is really the de facto successor to the EVO LTE, a little bit of comparison would be in order.  In our RF rundown article on the EVO LTE last spring, we stated that it "does not look to be a stellar RF performer" based on its low to moderate ERP/EIRP figures.  And our prediction proved quite prescient, as the EVO LTE has not been noted for its performance with weak signals.  The good news is that, on paper, the HTC One looks to be a notable improvement in this regard.

First, the dual antenna system is optimized for CDMA1X/EV-DO on antenna 0 and LTE on antenna 1.  But as long as only one antenna is in use (i.e. SVLTE is not active), the dual antennas can be switched at will to combat an RF fade at one antenna but not the other.  Second, LTE max EIRP has been increased by 4 dB over that of the EVO LTE.  Furthermore, LTE EIRP has been maximized around the 1912.5 MHz center frequency, 5 MHz FDD carrier bandwidth configuration that Sprint is currently deploying nationwide in its PCS G block spectrum.  In short, the Sprint variant of the HTC One has been tweaked specifically for the Sprint LTE network.

Source:  FCC




You the man AJ, thank you very much. Even though I am not fully sold on the htc one, I think I will get it to replace my evo and move my evo over to replace my gnex. If the gs4 lives up to the hype then I will get that one as well to replace my evo.
Thanks for taking a look at the specs, AJ!

I can't wait to get my paw on "One", har har har.
Will have to see the real world tests when they come out as I don't give much claim to the FCC numbers. Nothing against AJ at all and his excellent work. For example, on paper the Note2 looks much worse in the LTE 1900 band category than the Galaxy S3. I've compared these phones together numerous times and every time the Note2 has holds on to the signal longer, picks it up first, and has a usable signal in more places than S3.
As much as I love the looks and specs of this phone, i will be waiting a while before I jump in, I want to see what happens with the Nexus 5 and the Motorola xPhone. I love HTC phones for the most part, I have had all versions of the EVO, but I travel a lot out of the country and have been using an unlocked GNex overseas for the last year and I have fallen in love with the basically instant Android upgrades. It seems to take forever to get upgrades of the Sense skinned phones, or as in the case my Photon, no upgrades. I have been in Australia fort he last couple of months and the GNex has performed very well on both the Telstra and Optus networks.
"The other notable absence is SVDO support for simultaneous CDMA1X voice + EV-DO data, though its omission is growing less and less notable as time goes on. SVDO requires separate RF paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO. The first few Sprint LTE handsets did support SVDO, utilizing separate paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO/LTE. But the last nine Sprint LTE handsets have foregone SVDO, combining CDMA1X/EV-DO on a single path, so SVDO was likely just a temporary measure or a fringe benefit of the Qualcomm MSM8960 chipset and will not be a common Sprint handset feature going forward."

AJ, I'm I reading this correctly, no voice and data at the same time? Why would sprint or Qualcomm pull away from this?

"The other notable absence is SVDO support for simultaneous CDMA1X voice + EV-DO data, though its omission is growing less and less notable as time goes on. SVDO requires separate RF paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO. The first few Sprint LTE handsets did support SVDO, utilizing separate paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO/LTE. But the last nine Sprint LTE handsets have foregone SVDO, combining CDMA1X/EV-DO on a single path, so SVDO was likely just a temporary measure or a fringe benefit of the Qualcomm MSM8960 chipset and will not be a common Sprint handset feature going forward."AJ, I'm I reading this correctly, no voice and data at the same time? Why would sprint or Qualcomm pull away from this?


No voice and 3G at the same time. Voice and LTE will work just fine. SVDO was mainly a stopgap while Sprint built out their LTE network; since they're pretty far along in many places, the inconvenience of not being able to do voice and data on EvDO at the same time is a bit smaller now.

AJ, I'm I reading this correctly, no voice and data at the same time? Why would sprint or Qualcomm pull away from this?


greenvillesc, as Ian explains, SVDO capability affects only simultaneous CDMA1X voice and EV-DO data. It has no bearing on simultaneous CDMA1X voice and LTE data -- that is called SVLTE.

Also, as I explained in the article, SVDO requires separate RF paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO. In Sprint handsets over the last six months, those separate paths have not been present. CDMA1X and EV-DO have shared a path, LTE on the other path, and that has precluded SVDO.

Now, I am not sure why I did not notice this previously, but the SVDO capable handsets almost exclusively utilized the Qualcomm MSM8960, which is a processor and baseband modem rolled into one. Since the transition to a more powerful, standalone dual core or quad core processor plus a separate Qualcomm MDM9615 baseband modem, SVDO has gone away.

So, not to mistake correlation for causation, but the MDM9615 may not support separate RF paths for CDMA1X and EV-DO. And the correlation is quite strong.

AJ
I have to wonder if the aluminum back will interfere with GPS and radios like the Transformer Prime's apparent issue. Presumably HTC has tested it. Damn this is so not in my budget either. :/

I have to wonder if the aluminum back will interfere with GPS and radios like the Transformer Prime's apparent issue. Presumably HTC has tested it. Damn this is so not in my budget either. :/


The problem with Asus' original version of the Transformer Prime is that its back was fully aluminum with no RF window(s). That was changed in the TF700T version, which added a plastic strip across the aluminum back.

As for the HTC One, AnandTech reports that isolated segments of the aluminum back actually are the antennas.

The One uses the top and bottom aluminum strips for antennas, both of which are actively tuned to mitigate unintended attenuation from being held. There’s a plastic insulative strip in-between the two antennas and the main body.


http://www.anandtech.com/show/6754/hands-on-with-the-htc-one-formerly-m7

AJ
The One to rule them all.
i need svdo because there is still way more 3g than 4g on the sprint network. There is only 6 LTE towers live in my city
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Fifth313ment
Feb 25 2013 03:32 AM
I can live without SVDO but why not include the new LTE freqs? I mean if users keep their phones for two years, which most do, they will be missing out big time? Anyone have any ideas?

And thedoctor1971 don't think HTC tested anything and live by that. I realy don't trust HTC and that is truely sad as I love me EVO LTE (and all my other EVO's). I have been burned a bit too much and I'll be waiting on seeing what Samsung has up it's sleeves with the S4 and Google with the new Moto X and Nexus phone. Maybe if the ONE/EVO is as good as many think I'll check it out but just the LTE freq issue is enough for me to leave it. Not to mention that dumb new version of sense with blinkfeedoffmybattery24/7!

EDIT: Also what were they thinking about the button scheme? I mean having top make the menu button the hold on the back button and double tap to bring up app switcher? WTF? What if I don't tap fast enough and end up back at the home screen? What if I tap to slow and end up on Google Search (also mapped to holding home)? What were they thinking? There are so many innovations on the One (front speakers, IR) and they make such as huge mistake that just about every previewer says makes the phone hard to use. I would really love the IR though and I love the new design (minus button layout). The small battery, non removable battery and no expandable memory will probably make me pass on it in the end. I beat a million dollars the new S4 has a removable battery and memory! Arg HTC!
With it only having the 25 LTE 1900 band is that going to affect the the signal or speeds?

i need svdo because there is still way more 3g than 4g on the sprint network. There is only 6 LTE towers live in my city


No one "needs" SVDO, though you may want that feature. If so, you will likely need to hang on to your current handset or stick within the handful of handsets that were released with SVDO last year, as there has not been a new SVDO capable handset in the last six months.

AJ

I can live without SVDO but why not include the new LTE freqs? I mean if users keep their phones for two years, which most do, they will be missing out big time? Anyone have any ideas?


"[M]issing out big time?" Are you asking a question or making an assertion?

I think "missing out big time" is an overreaction. Unless Network Vision deployment picks up dramatically, LTE 800 will likely still be a while in coming, and due to SMR 800 MHz spectrum issues, many markets will not get LTE 800 for years, if ever. So, Sprint needs to focus on finishing LTE 1900 rollout before doubling back for LTE 800.

As for TD-LTE 2600, that is still under Clearwire's control. We may not see TD-LTE 2600 in any devices until the Sprint-Clearwire-Dish wrangling gets sorted out. Even then, TD-LTE may be limited at first to data only devices (e.g. hotspots, cards/sticks) that tend to use greater amounts of data and can actually take advantage of the higher speeds that the bandwidth of TD-LTE 2600 can offer.

AJ
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Fifth313ment
Feb 25 2013 11:12 AM

"[M]issing out big time?" Are you asking a question or making an assertion?I think "missing out big time" is an overreaction. Unless Network Vision deployment picks up dramatically, LTE 800 will likely still be a while in coming, and due to SMR 800 MHz spectrum issues, many markets will not get LTE 800 for years, if ever. So, Sprint needs to focus on finishing LTE 1900 rollout before doubling back for LTE 800.As for TD-LTE 2600, that is still under Clearwire's control. We may not see TD-LTE 2600 in any devices until the Sprint-Clearwire-Dish wrangling gets sorted out. Even then, TD-LTE may be limited at first to data only devices (e.g. hotspots, cards/sticks) that tend to use greater amounts of data and can actually take advantage of the higher speeds that the bandwidth of TD-LTE 2600 can offer.AJ


Thanks Wave, no it was a question and it was exactly what I was asking. :)

"[M]issing out big time?" Are you asking a question or making an assertion?I think "missing out big time" is an overreaction. Unless Network Vision deployment picks up dramatically, LTE 800 will likely still be a while in coming, and due to SMR 800 MHz spectrum issues, many markets will not get LTE 800 for years, if ever. So, Sprint needs to focus on finishing LTE 1900 rollout before doubling back for LTE 800.As for TD-LTE 2600, that is still under Clearwire's control. We may not see TD-LTE 2600 in any devices until the Sprint-Clearwire-Dish wrangling gets sorted out. Even then, TD-LTE may be limited at first to data only devices (e.g. hotspots, cards/sticks) that tend to use greater amounts of data and can actually take advantage of the higher speeds that the bandwidth of TD-LTE 2600 can offer.AJ

the 800 question for most of us is moot...I'll be happy if I have ANY LTE by the end of the year in my area of OC which likely means I'm at least another year plus from seeing 800 if I'm lucky. The handful that are enjoying LTE now (either officially or not) should be happy. Since the release of the ONE will be around the announcing of the GS4, that's when I'll make the decision but leaning towards the sturdy ONE.
I simply do not believe that Sprint has had enough time to test out the new frequencies. That would be my guess as to why LTE 800 and TD-LTE 2600 are not included.

I simply do not believe that Sprint has had enough time to test out the new frequencies. That would be my guess as to why LTE 800 and TD-LTE 2600 are not included.


Yep, as the saying goes, "timing is everything." And the way it goes right now, HTC and Samsung introduce their flagship handsets in the late winter, early spring around the time of Mobile World Congress, which is happening as we speak.

So, if LTE 800 and TD-LTE 2600 were not an option right now due to timing, would those who are disappointed rather have had Sprint pass on the HTC One, thus not likely carry an HTC flagship this year?

AJ
When HTC announced the One I was all in. Then I remembered that Google I/O is in May. I think I'll wait until then to decide. I really like the One but I think it might be time for me to go for a Nexus/Moto X, if the specs are up to par.

When HTC announced the One I was all in. Then I remembered that Google I/O is in May. I think I'll wait until then to decide. I really like the One but I think it might be time for me to go for a Nexus/Moto X, if the specs are up to par.


Agreed, waiting a few months may not be a bad idea. Your options will only expand, not contract. That said, I would not exactly hold out hope for a Google Nexus handset. A CDMA2000/LTE version -- especially a Sprint LTE version -- may not be an option. Much to the delight of 3GPP fanboys, the Nexus trend going forward may omit any CDMA2000 capability.

AJ
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Fifth313ment
Feb 25 2013 10:40 PM

Agreed, waiting a few months may not be a bad idea. Your options will only expand, not contract. That said, I would not exactly hold out hope for a Google Nexus handset. A CDMA2000/LTE version -- especially a Sprint LTE version -- may not be an option. Much to the delight of 3GPP fanboys, the Nexus trend going forward may omit any CDMA2000 capability.AJ

Seconded! Not only the new Nexus/Moto X but the next Samsung Galaxy S4! I recently read a great article about how HTC has complained that due to keeping their phones thin they had to sacrifice removable media and battery however Samsung's phone was thinner and had both! Lol, the SGS4 has me excited and I'm an HTC lover. I guess no more...
Making a handset out of seamless aluminum is more difficult and restrictive than making one out of cheap pieces of plastic that are glued together.

;)

AJ

Agreed, waiting a few months may not be a bad idea. Your options will only expand, not contract. That said, I would not exactly hold out hope for a Google Nexus handset. A CDMA2000/LTE version -- especially a Sprint LTE version -- may not be an option. Much to the delight of 3GPP fanboys, the Nexus trend going forward may omit any CDMA2000 capability.AJ

That's true. I just checked my email and was reminded about the $100 trade in offer. My mind has been set. I'm getting an HTC One.

Agreed, waiting a few months may not be a bad idea. Your options will only expand, not contract. That said, I would not exactly hold out hope for a Google Nexus handset. A CDMA2000/LTE version -- especially a Sprint LTE version -- may not be an option. Much to the delight of 3GPP fanboys, the Nexus trend going forward may omit any CDMA2000 capability.AJ


The word on the street is this new device will not technically be a nexus but a device close to it receiving AOSP updates. It will have features the nexus series does not like MicroSD card slots, CDMA/LTE Support and higher-end feature sets (where it would be impossible to market at Nexus unsubsidized pricing).

I'm excited for it but the reality rarely lives up to the hype.