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ingenium

What is the difference between Sprint APNs?

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So it seems there are at least 3 Sprint APNs: n.ispsn, r.ispsn, and x.ispsn.

I remember seeing n.ispsn on some of my older devices. I have a hotspot from Calyx (via Mobile Citizen) that has a Sprint account that I can log into, and it's using r.ispsn. My Pixel 2 XL is using x.ispsn.

Does anyone know what the difference is between them? My only guesses are that n.ispsn is "native", and r.ispsn is "reseller". Or perhaps n.ispsn is NATed via CGNAT and r.ispsn is "routed" meaning a public IP? I have confirmed that the hotspot that uses r.ispsn is assigned a public, routable IP. But that doesn't answer what x.ispsn is. My phone with x.ispsn is assigned a NATed IP.

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R=routable, N =Non routable X not sure. r.ispsn devices receive a routable ivp4 address.

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R=routable, N =Non routable X not sure. r.ispsn devices receive a routable ivp4 address.
Do you know if you can change a device with n.ispsn to r.ispsn to get a routable IP with it?

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

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4 minutes ago, ingenium said:

Do you know if you can change a device with n.ispsn to r.ispsn to get a routable IP with it?

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

I believe that would take a plan or SoC change, this is a great question but I am not sure. 

I know you can add a public IP address but that is not necessarily routable as you will hit that carrier NAT.  I have noticed there were some n.ispsn routers handed out over the last year; I believe they were the newer 910 hotspot but they were recently switched over to r.ispsn on the mysterious "backend" we are here trying to learn about. It caused quite the nasty outage for some folks for a few days.

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