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Well, with all the spectrum sprint has on b41 I was expecting all the pico cells to utilize b41. Verizon, to my knowledge, doesn't have a single band with that much spectrum depth.

 

 

 

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And is not sprint band 25 coverage is not like Swiss cheese in a lot of markets?

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And is not sprint band 25 coverage is not like Swiss cheese in a lot of markets?

Yup, but why not fill the gap with b41? With CA active they have similar propagation, at least that is what sprint is always saying and what i have experienced in Phoenix.

If the goal is to win root awards then that means pushing as much traffic on b41 I would think.

 

 

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Yup, but why not fill the gap with b41? With CA active they have similar propagation, at least that is what sprint is always saying and what i have experienced in Phoenix.

If the goal is to win root awards then that means pushing as much traffic on b41 I would think.

 

 

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Small cells help increase capacity AND coverage.

 

Small cells are used at the edge of cell signals and in between sites to increase coverage. From 2t2r or SIMO/SISO small cells setups, band 25 will propagate much farther than 41.

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Are b41 small cells going to be 2t2r? Or will they be 8t8r?

 

 

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Are b41 small cells going to be 2t2r? Or will they be 8t8r?

 

 

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The hype was through the roof in the small cell industry when Nokia Networks unveiled their 4t4r Flexi Zone 2 band 41 small cell last year...

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The hype was through the roof in the small cell industry when Nokia Networks unveiled their 4t4r Flexi Zone 2 band 41 small cell last year...

Ah... Ok. Will the be capable of CA?

 

 

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Ah... Ok. Will the be capable of CA?

 

 

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The hype was through the roof when Nokia Networks unveiled the first carrier aggregation capable small cell unit two years ago with their Nokia networks flexi zone band 41 pico cell running 200 Mbps on the downlink on band 41.

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Now, don't over hype this...

 

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This is under construction right in front of my office. Doesn't look like the Sprint pictures earlier. Maybe AT&T? AFiFMI4.jpg

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This is under construction right in front of my office. Doesn't look like the Sprint pictures earlier. Maybe AT&T? AFiFMI4.jpg

Coordinates?

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This is under construction right in front of my office. Doesn't look like the Sprint pictures earlier. Maybe AT&T?

 

You might want to check the Samsung thread, since you're in San Francisco.

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So is it Sprint or Verizon in the pics?

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Verizon

 

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I found out a little more about these. They're actually less of mini macros and more of cascaded antennas. The fiber from the RRHs ties into nearby macro sites.

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I found out a little more about these. They're actually less of mini macros and more of cascaded antennas. The fiber from the RRHs ties into nearby macro sites.

Any idea how much coverage that site provides?

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Any idea how much coverage that site provides?

 

Band 25:

 

2016-05-04-5A0D7.png

 

Band 26:

 

2016-05-04-5A8C5.png

 

The three red dots are the satellites for that site. Last time I visited them, they were SISO and 3G-only, and I had to toggle airplane mode to connect to them. That is to say, if they were actually broadcasting LTE, either I couldn't connect to it, or it was using the same GCI/PCI as the parent site.

 

One more nearby with two satellites. Band 25:

 

2016-05-04-5A0DE.png

 

Band 26:

 

2016-05-04-5A8BE.png

 

Those two are actually in a location where the LTE map layer shows fair coverage (although band 41 from the site to the north with the green dot covers it well):

 

2016-05-04-westwego-marrero-lte.png

 

The other three, I'm not really sure about. They're definitely within a large gap between sites, but it shows good coverage:

 

2016-05-04-marrero-harvey-gretna-lte.png

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The three red dots are the satellites for that site. Last time I visited them, they were SISO and 3G-only, and I had to toggle airplane mode to connect to them. That is to say, if they were actually broadcasting LTE, either I couldn't connect to it, or it was using the same GCI/PCI as the parent site.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for taking the time to add all of that detail!

 

It's interesting that the second site satellites are within the B25 coverage.  Is there a topographical reason for that?

 

Also, may I ask, how are you getting the individual sector coverage info?  (I'm assuming that's what black polygons are.)

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It's interesting that the second site satellites are within the B25 coverage.  Is there a topographical reason for that?

Doubtful. This is New Orleans, everything is flat and sinking.

 

Also, may I ask, how are you getting the individual sector coverage info?  (I'm assuming that's what black polygons are.)

CellMapper. Keep in mind the polygons aren't the complete extent of coverage for that site -- just the stronger parts of what has been observed.

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I found out a little more about these. They're actually less of mini macros and more of cascaded antennas. The fiber from the RRHs ties into nearby macro sites.

 

Ah. C-RAN is it? Fascinating!

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Ah. C-RAN is it? Fascinating!

I don't think it would be Cloud RAN, insofar as I believe it's just tied into a standard Ericsson RBS cabinet at the base of the macro site. It might even be a second cabinet -- some of the NOLA permits called for 4 rather than 2 for some reason; and the CDMA cell ID is different.

 

It's more of an ODAS. This is the XD -> XB relationship I brought up in the town hall thread. There is an XB cascade ID at the location of the macro, and each antenna has an XD cascade ID associated with the XB ID.

 

EDIT: I'm pretty sure it's just one of these outdoor configurations. These went up shortly before Sprint retired the RRUS 11 B25, which would explain why we didn't see it more often.

 

YC1B5M6.png

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It's more of an ODAS. This is the XD -> XB relationship I brought up in the town hall thread. There is an XB cascade ID at the location of the macro, and each antenna has an XD cascade ID associated with the XB ID.

 

Exactly.

 

Last year, David Koeller found some unexpected GCIs near West Campus at the University of Kansas.  Later, I determined that it was DAS.  Now, this is a public thread, so I will not post full Cascade IDs.  But here are partially redacted Cascade IDs of two of the several DAS RRUs:  ****XD472 and ****XD474.

 

Then, at the Plaza Storage macro site about a mile away, I discovered a second base station, a second Cascade ID:  ****XB470.  Note the alphanumerical relationships.  Bingo.  There is where the DAS interfaces with the macro network.

 

AJ

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It's more of an ODAS. This is the XD -> XB relationship I brought up in the town hall thread. There is an XB cascade ID at the location of the macro, and each antenna has an XD cascade ID associated with the XB ID.

 

 

I just came across several of these XD/XB sites in the LA Metro market.

 

So, if there's an XB, should there be some XD satellites?

 

Unfortunately it's the areas that are served by these sites that tend not to be mapped on Sensorly.  (And forget the Sprint.com maps -- that's useless as far as hunting sites in this market.)

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Then, at the Plaza Storage macro site about a mile away, I discovered a second base station, a second Cascade ID:  ****XB470.  Note the alphanumerical relationships.  Bingo.  There is where the DAS interfaces with the macro network.

 

We found this one a few years ago during the earlier part of NV deployment:

 

fq_das_nodes.png

 

fq_das_head.png

 

So, if there's an XB, should there be some XD satellites?

 

It's the other way around: If you see XD, you know there's a corresponding XB.

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