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Band 25 Pico Cells (Samsung)

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Samsung Outdoor Pico eNB 1.9 Ghz


 


This is the Samsung Outdoor Pico eNB small cell for LTE 1900 that will be deployed by Sprint. Outdoor small cells are utilized to providie additional capacity and coverage mainly in areas where there is a high population density such as major malls, major streets with lot of busineses, train stations, airports, and the like. 


 


Small cells are mostly PnP where you just plug everything in and fire it up and it will auto configure itself by downloading parameters and additional information from the network. Utilizing the latest advances in small cell technology, these pico cells would also over time optimize itself based on feedback from UE and neighboring small cells and macro cells.


 


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Diagrams


 


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Samsung LTE 1.9 Ghz Indoor Pico Cell


 


Front


 


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Back


 


 


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Above


 


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I know this is WIP... but...

 

What kind of antennas are likely to be used with this?  Are these just for 1.9 GHz?

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I know this is WIP... but...

 

What kind of antennas are likely to be used with this?  Are these just for 1.9 GHz?

 

omnis and this one is strictly for 1.9

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I have seen one site with this

Unless you are Chicago you haven't. Sprint small cells only exist in fits until deployment which will not happen til summer.

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Unless you are Chicago you haven't. Sprint small cells only exist in fits until deployment which will not happen til summer.

Oh ok, then maybe I havent, I might be mistaking with another carrier (at&t has small cells out here). sorry for bad reporting.

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Looks interesting! When can I buy one? :D I kid, I kid.

 

-Anthony

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Looks interesting! When can I buy one? :D I kid, I kid.

 

-Anthony

EBay.

 

I'm not lying btw. You can find sprint vendor equipment with the cascade ID's and such on eBay for sale.

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EBay.

 

I'm not lying btw. You can find sprint vendor equipment with the cascade ID's and such on eBay for sale.

Hmmm... Interesting...

 

-Anthony

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So these are coming up in Chicago now? Or, have they already been there.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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So these are coming up in Chicago now? Or, have they already been there.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Only in FITs and somewhere in Chicago. 

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Isn't B25 saturated in most populated areas?  Why not deploy B41 small cells?

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Isn't B25 saturated in most populated areas?  Why not deploy B41 small cells?

I was going to say.. why would they bother to use these instead of small cells that can do both 1900 & 2500/2600?

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Isn't B25 saturated in most populated areas?  Why not deploy B41 small cells?

 

Increasing site density increases network capacity which decreases saturation... Adding additional bands isn't the only way to increase data speeds. Sprints site density is abysmal in many many markets compared to the other three.  

 

They do have B41 small cells. Different project, same phase. Ericsson has their 1.9 FDD pico and Nokia has their 2.6 Flexi Zone. 

 

I was going to say.. why would they bother to use these instead of small cells that can do both 1900 & 2500/2600?

 

Does not yet exist. 

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What do you mean these are "plug-and-play?" Just power? How do they connect to the network? Or, do they just act as repeaters. Is there a lengthy permit process with these?

 

 

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What do you mean these are "plug-and-play?" Just power? How do they connect to the network? Or, do they just act as repeaters. Is there a lengthy permit process with these?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

You plug in the power line, you plug in the ethernet Cat 5e/Cat 6 or Fiber Optic backhaul, and have the green light showing and the job of the installer is done. Most of the prep work is done at the warehouse. 

 

Unlike macro sites you don't need different individuals and crews in order to get a site live. No need for integration and comissioning techs or acceptance techs that do site inspections and the like. Nada. 

 

Upon power up the small cells will automatically discover and authenticate itself into the Sprint network, download the preset configuration parameters from the network after authentication and authorization, and then optimize itself by adjusting parameters based on feedback from its surroundings via its own readings and information sent back from UE that are connected to it. 

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Seems simple, but where is this fiber/Ethernet cable going? Say they decide to put one of these on busy Michigan Avenue in Chicago on a light post, where does it go? Seems like quite a project.

 

 

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Seems simple, but where is this fiber/Ethernet cable going? Say they decide to put one of these on busy Michigan Avenue in Chicago on a light post, where does it go? Seems like quite a project.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

When there is a will, there is a way. 

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This is just data correct? So plug and play like a big ass wap. ☺

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This is just data correct? So plug and play like a big ass wap. ☺

 

 

Yep!

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They do have B41 small cells. Different project, same phase. Ericsson has their 1.9 FDD pico and Nokia has their 2.6 Flexi Zone. 

 

I hope I don't derail this Samsung thread too much, but is the ALU equivalent their Metro Cell Outdoor (B25) ?  As far as B41 support I can't find anything from ALU.  The closest thing is the Metro Radio Outdoor for B38.  Know of anything else?

 

Here's where I got that info from:

http://wireless.fcc.gov/workshop/OVERVIEW%20-%20Milind%20Buddhikot%20-%20Alcatel%20Lucent.pdf

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Major carriers partner to bring LTE to Chicago's subway

 

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has announced that the city has reached a deal with Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile to bring 4G LTE from all four carriers to the Chicago Transit Authority's subway system. The network, which will replace the decade-old system currently in Chicago's subways, will provide continuous coverage for 22 miles.

 

The deal is worth $32.5 million with all four carriers agreeing to fund the entire upgrade related to the design and construction of a next generation distributed antenna system.  The upgrade is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2015.

 

Source: City of Chicago

 

 

Will Sprint be utilizing these 1900 LTE Pico Cells for Chicago's subway? 

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Will Sprint be utilizing these 1900 LTE Pico Cells for Chicago's subway?

You would think they would use leaky coax and run down through the tunnels for continuous coverage. The small cells would provide more capacity, but would have a lot of handoffs. Leaky coax will provide more seamless coverage and less handoff issues. And probably less expensive with less nodes.

 

Leaky coax capacity should not be a problem as there would rarely be more than 1-2 trains per node at any given moment in a tunnel. Most likely the existing 3G/voice solution in the tunnels is leaky coax or DAS.

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Major carriers partner to bring LTE to Chicago's subway

 

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has announced that the city has reached a deal with Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile to bring 4G LTE from all four carriers to the Chicago Transit Authority's subway system. The network, which will replace the decade-old system currently in Chicago's subways, will provide continuous coverage for 22 miles.

 

The deal is worth $32.5 million with all four carriers agreeing to fund the entire upgrade related to the design and construction of a next generation distributed antenna system.  The upgrade is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2015.

 

Source: City of Chicago

 

 

Will Sprint be utilizing these 1900 LTE Pico Cells for Chicago's subway? 

"The contract with Aldridge, based in Libertyville, is a key part of a $27 million project to improve the subway cellular network, consisting of about 111/2 miles of underground passage on the Blue and Red lines. The network, which the CTA licenses to six wireless service providers, generates $1.8 million a year to the transit agency, officials said.

Aldridge will use the CTA's existing fiber-optic cable, power sources and other equipment to minimize the upgrade's cost, officials said."

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2014-07-09/news/ct-cta-subway-wireless-upgrade-met-0710-20140710_1_cta-riders-subway-cellular-network-cta-board

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