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Marcelo Claure, Town Hall Meetings, New Family Share Pack Plan, Unlimited Individual Plan, Discussion Thread

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While the lawsuit is garbage, it was an avoidable result. Sprints behavior with alliances to open stores (both the radio shack deal and the Dixon carphone deal) seems fickle at best. Atleast one semi-rural radio shack store here in south Mississippi flipped to sprint cobranding for several months and then went out of business. A big collective "duh" considering most residents in said area wouldn't have had contiguous coverage in said rural area ????????‍♂️

 

 

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While the lawsuit is garbage, it was an avoidable result. Sprints behavior with alliances to open stores (both the radio shack deal and the Dixon carphone deal) seems fickle at best. Atleast one semi-rural radio shack store here in south Mississippi flipped to sprint cobranding for several months and then went out of business. A big collective "duh" considering most residents in said area wouldn't have had contiguous coverage in said rural area ????????‍♂️

 

 

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I'm in South Mississippi right now...LTE roaming on Cspire...barely anything Sprint near me...but I did hit a couple sites

 

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Sprint has just extended its "1 Year of Free Service" Promotion, which was set to expire today, through July 30th.

 

https://www.sprint.com/en/shop/offers/free-unlimited.html?ECID=vanity:1yearfree

 

What do you all think this means?

Either it went well and they wanna keep adding, or it didn't go well enough and they wanna reach goal. I actually signed my dad and brother up for this promo, the actual order process went smoothly but after that things went south. In the email they send you they say once you initiate the number port it will take up to 10 minutes, well instead it took 24 hours. I thought something went wrong and calling in nobody could find an account or even had a clue of the promo, ended up getting passed around like a hot potato. Not a good way to welcome a new customer.

For my brother they kept saying his card was declined when it wasn't, so he told them to just cancel the order. Next day it goes through anyway and they ship him a SIM card. By then he'd already ported to Verizon and washed his hands of Sprint over that ordeal.

 

Also been reading many reports of people porting in then back out sometimes as soon as an hour later because the coverage wasn't up to par.

 

So based on my personal experiences and other similar reports to my own experience have me leaning towards it not going well enough, but who knows (hence me also suggesting it did go well)

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Likely means it's working while saving money on acquisition costs.

I think the plan is genius... It's essentially the same as buying out a contract or paying customers to switch without actually having to spend any money.

 

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I'd argue that this is even better than paying people to switch. By giving out a free year of service, they can spread the acquisition cost over that entire year instead of incurring the large one time cost of paying off a phone or contract. Plus, if people leave before the year of free service is up, Sprint actually saves money since they didn't make a large payout.

 

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Either it went well and they wanna keep adding, or it didn't go well enough and they wanna reach goal. I actually signed my dad and brother up for this promo, the actual order process went smoothly but after that things went south. In the email they send you they say once you initiate the number port it will take up to 10 minutes, well instead it took 24 hours. I thought something went wrong and calling in nobody could find an account or even had a clue of the promo, ended up getting passed around like a hot potato. Not a good way to welcome a new customer.

For my brother they kept saying his card was declined when it wasn't, so he told them to just cancel the order. Next day it goes through anyway and they ship him a SIM card. By then he'd already ported to Verizon and washed his hands of Sprint over that ordeal.

 

Also been reading many reports of people porting in then back out sometimes as soon as an hour later because the coverage wasn't up to par.

 

So based on my personal experiences and other similar reports to my own experience have me leaning towards it not going well enough, but who knows (hence me also suggesting it did go well)

 

My GF switched over. There was trouble at first, because they said her phone was reported as lost/stolen, and it took 2/3 calls to AT&T to get it resolved and made available to Sprint.

 

So not as easy as just sliding a new SIM card in.

 

But she is very happy with her new unlimited data, loves the HD voice calls, and has had no issues with service.

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With this promo it could also mean we should see some leaps and bounds with the network within that year. Sprint throws free service at folks and saves Sprint some money on trying to convince people to try out the network. People bite at the offer and realize the network isn't half bad and bam they stay. Just my take but honestly who knows why they went the free option.

 

 

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So it only took 66.7% of a phone call?

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Very Interesting Article....

 

Commentary: Sprint’s bowing to the cable guys, as it puts T-Mobile deal on hold, looks shortsighted

Sprint is proving more desperate than we thought.

Rather than continue down the road to a logical — and until now, inevitable — strategic merger with Bellevue-based T-Mobile US, the struggling wireless carrier has put that plan on hold in favor of what looks like a financial salve. It may say more about Sprint’s weakness than investors, buoyed by Sprint’s share-price rally last week, would like to admit.

Sprint, which slid to fourth place two years ago behind T-Mobile and burned through billions of dollars trying to stay competitive, is now reportedly in exclusive discussions with cable giants Charter Communications and Comcast, as its regretful Japanese owner Masayoshi Son looks for an out. (That news gave Sprint’s stock a boost on Tuesday.) The messy, almost soap-opera-like story line is only getting messier.

Rather than nail down a deal with T-Mobile first, which shareholders of both companies could easily get behind, Sprint is negotiating with two far more powerful companies that will use its network to their advantage and may not even make an accompanying equity investment in the company.

The Wall Street Journal noted that the cable operators could help Sprint build its next-generation network, which is help that Sprint needs. But a takeover or merger would be a more assured outcome for shareholders than waiting to see what sort of complex agreement Charter and Comcast’s shrewd dealmakers work up.

On the one hand, none of this necessarily precludes an eventual merger with T-Mobile or takeover by either Charter or Comcast later on. Still, Sprint’s challenged financial position has to be driving frustrated parent SoftBank Group’s sudden dealings with Charter and Comcast. They, too, could have opted for T-Mobile, but why when Sprint has far less bargaining power?

Comcast has started to run TV commercials this month for a Comcast wireless service, which is marketed under its less-detested consumer brand Xfinity. The $188 billion juggernaut wants to bundle mobile plans with its cable, internet and wireline phone packages to assert its power over the communications space before the introduction of ultrafast 5G networks that will enhance video-streaming capabilities, among other things.

To this end, Comcast and Charter, which plans to introduce its own wireless offering in 2018, recently formed an alliance, and both have old agreements with Verizon Communications that allow them to resell wireless service using the No. 1 provider’s network in their respective territories as a supplement to their own Wi-Fi hot spots. But it’s not enough to get them where they want to be.

This is where Sprint — which sits on a trove of spectrum — comes in.

Predictably, you have Comcast CEO Brian Roberts on one side pushing for an agreement with Sprint that would be similar to the Verizon accord but with better terms. And on the other side sits billionaire dealmaker John Malone, Charter’s biggest backer, characteristically encouraging a joint outright takeover of Sprint.

It’s an odd pairing as the two have historically employed very different strategies, and rarely is a Malone-led transaction a straightforward one.

The knee-jerk reaction to the Sprint-Comcast-Charter news last week is that T-Mobile is being left out in the cold. But that’s not quite the case.

T-Mobile has no urgent need to sell itself or find a partner — in fact, its successful strategy is what’s caused Verizon and AT&T to scramble to offer competitive unlimited data packages. Of course, T-Mobile would be stronger with Sprint, but that deal is still possible and in the meantime it will probably just keep taking customers.

Everything is fluid. Charlie Ergen and his Dish Network are still out there lurking and, despite outward appearances, likely interested in playing a role in the industry consolidation. It wouldn’t be surprising to see Ergen again try to upset a Sprint or T-Mobile transaction.

And Verizon, whose CEO Lowell McAdam even floated the idea of merging with Comcast before the Charter partnership got announced, could intervene somehow as well.

With this many big and unpredictable personalities involved, a lot could change in the coming weeks and months. It would be way premature to suggest Sprint and T-Mobile have suddenly traded places.

The safer bet is still on the one with the better business, not the desperate seller.



(sorry...Tapatalk is not allowing me to imbed the link)

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Very Interesting Article....

 

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That was a good read, kct1975.

 

My view of the situation is that Charter and Comcast are going to try merging together eventually, and are looking to use Sprint as a way to claim they need to merge in order to help "save" Sprint, or in some way use Sprint's misfortunes/desperate situation to get a merger to go through between the three. Then I expect something may end up happening involving Verizon to mix.

 

The ultimate wireless carrier meets telecommunications meets media entertainment company is a combination between Comcast, Charter, Sprint, and Verizon. Between them, they'd have incredible reach in these industries with bundle packages to rival AT&T. If this happens, which really depends on how pro-big business the Trump FCC Administration is, because this will be Hyuuuggge, if approved.

 

It'll be beautiful, believe me. A big beautiful company that'll offer really great media. Except Trump hates NBC. Go figure, maybe it won't happen. After all, there are those SNL Trump skits. Although, I wouldn't be surprised if the executives apologize to get the deal to go through.

 

Then there is the question of T-Mobile. If they don't go with Sprint, I can envision Dish and AT&T getting involved, in order to compete with the other. We'll see...

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Comcast does so much so well... Toss in charter for more fun? I can't you guys. If sprint becomes "xfinity wireless" I will clutch my rosary and run far, far away forever

 

 

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Comcast does so much so well... Toss in charter for more fun? I can't you guys. If sprint becomes "xfinity wireless" I will clutch my rosary and run far, far away forever

 

 

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in nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti

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I'd rather see Charter buy Sprint and brand its wireless service Spectrum, plus it would keep four wireless providers.  

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I'd rather see Charter buy Sprint and brand its wireless service Spectrum, plus it would keep four wireless providers.

I like the name idea, especially as it could be used well with Sprint's spectrum.

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Just imagine if Sprint wouldnt of pulled out of spectrumco. And actually have deployed it. We would be talking something totally different now.

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in nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti

You forgot to say Amen!  :D

 

Whatever happens to Sprint will take some time to arrange everything on the network. Don't expect any miracles overnight.

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You forgot to say Amen!  :D

 

Whatever happens to Sprint will take some time to arrange everything on the network. Don't expect any miracles overnight.

Thank you for the reminder.

 

Yes, I know things will take awhile getting the networks on the same system. Actually this reminded me back when AT&T Wireless and Cingular Wireless merged together. I was reading HowardForums alot back then (even posted a few times every so often). I remember when this was happening, there were alot of discussion pertaining to the "Blue" Network and the "Orange" Network. At the time, I figured this meant AT&T was "Blue" and Cingular was "Orange", and talk regarding this went on for some time, with people referring to various connection differences between the two.

 

I'm certainly curious about the process if it were to happen between Sprint and T-Mobile, or whichever other carrier may be involved in a merger with Sprint, etc.

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Just imagine if Sprint wouldnt of pulled out of spectrumco. And actually have deployed it. We would be talking something totally different now.

 

Yeah, imagine that! Imagine if they did not spend $35B+ on Nextel + $9B For Nextel Partners + another $9B on Affiliates. Imagine that they had actually merged with Alltel, Metro, Leap and other sundry CDMA providers instead.

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Now you're being facetious.

 

 

Yeah, imagine that! Imagine if they did not spend $35B+ on Nextel + $9B For Nextel Partners + another $9B on Affiliates. Imagine that they had actually merged with Alltel, Metro, Leap and other sundry CDMA providers instead.

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Now you're being facetious.

 

 

 

Nope, Sprint made a lot of very costly mistakes.

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I'd rather see Charter buy Sprint and brand its wireless service Spectrum, plus it would keep four wireless providers.

I like the name idea, especially as it could be used well with Sprint's spectrum.

I mentioned this name theory while back...

I recently read that T-Mobile would rather merge with a cable company (like Dish), thus possibly ending any Sprint-T-Mobile merge, I wonder if a merge with Charter Communications/Spectrum/Time Warner would be a better mix. I'm curious of the pros and cons.

 

On a side note, I always thought a while back that if Sprint were to rename itself, that Spectrum would be a perfect name, butl TWC took it.

 

As for the idea by Arysyn of a combination between Comcast, Charter, Sprint, and Verizon, At first I don't think it will fly. Just looking at the video subscribers alone below, Comcast alone takes up 1/3 of the pie.

Cable_Mergers_2014_and_2015_After_Update

Adding in Charter and Verizon and it may be too big to fly with the feds and that's not even taking into account gobbling up Sprint. But as they say, never say never, being that Verizon was in talks with Charter back in January, it does make you think anything is possible, even a 4 way tie up.

 

​Both cable companies have agreed not to pursue any merge or acquisition with anyone for a year, but that doesn't mean they can't plant the seeds that will sprout out 1 year later. It would be interesting to see

1-a shared spectrum deal with Sprint is announced in 2 months, then to follow

2-with Sprint merging with T-Mobile with Sprint buying them out with the collateral of the shared spectrum deal and Maya putting in the remaining dollars.

3-A year after the Comcast/Charter no merge/buy year agreement is done, they both merge.

4-Then 6 months they merged company announces to buy out Sprint.

 

As Arysyn said, "it'll be huuuuggggeee"

 

Ok, now I'll go back to sleep and dream a bit more.

 

source pic: DailyTech.com

 

 

TS

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Hi TwoSpirits,

 

Hopefully you slept well and didn't have a dream of a boardroom merger battle with Donald Trump and myself yelling out through tense business negotiations, ha!

 

You very well may be right about my idea being too big of a merger for the FCC to approve, but what I'm going by in my thinking is the out of the ordinary nature of the Trump Administration combined with this being one of the most business-oriented administrations in U.S. political history. I'm definitely not expecting any big mergers overnight, but in a step by step process I believe could lead to a two carrier situation.

 

We've been hearing alot on/off about the T-Mobile merger with Sprint. Then suddenly this Charter/Comcast possibility gets announced and seems to captivate Sprint's attention. To me, this means that Charter and Comcast may have given Sprint executives reason to think this would be a bigger and better deal for Sprint both in the short term to their investors and with long term growth potential.

 

Comcast already has a great working business relationship with Verizon, which I doubt they'd want to jeopardize, especially a deal where Comcast technically would have much better reach with their digital entertainment platform with Verizon than they would with Sprint. Hence why there have been the reported statements that Sprint could still merge with T-Mobile in the future, etc

 

Only difference is that I believe it won't be T-Mobile Sprint merges with under the Charter/Comcast deal, but rather Verizon. Also, I think the Spectrum naming idea is a very good idea you mentioned, TwoSpirits. I think that might happen if Charter/Comcast do get this deal to go through, especially since Xfinity Mobile already is in use.

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Comcast already has a great working business relationship with Verizon, which I doubt they'd want to jeopardize, 

 

There is a saying, "money talks, and bullsh1t walks". If the deal is better with Spint/Softbank you can rest assure that Verizon will be dropped like a hot potato. 

 

TS

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There is a saying, "money talks, and bullsh1t walks". If the deal is better with Spint/Softbank you can rest assure that Verizon will be dropped like a hot potato.

 

TS

That is true.

 

I still think Comcast is going to try appeasing both, but we'll see...

 

In the meantime I'm a bit curious why there hasn't been much talk about Dish, regardless of whether they try again with T-Mobile, or make a counter offer for Sprint, etc. I thought they had a deadline coming up soon with the FCC.

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I mentioned this name theory while back...

 

 

As for the idea by Arysyn of a combination between Comcast, Charter, Sprint, and Verizon, At first I don't think it will fly. Just looking at the video subscribers alone below, Comcast alone takes up 1/3 of the pie.

 

 

 

 

TS

I don't get the anti-trust argument against cable companies merging. They dont compete directly. Cable companies are local monopolies who compete with sat. And telephone companies to deliver content.

 

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I don't get the anti-trust argument against cable companies merging. They dont compete directly. Cable companies are local monopolies who compete with sat. And telephone companies to deliver content.

 

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Verizon and AT&T compete directly with the local cable company in many cases.  In my area, I have Verizon FiOS, and Cox is also available (but significantly more expensive for whatever reason).

 

- Trip

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