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Marcelo Claure, Town Hall Meetings, New Family Share Pack Plan, Unlimited Individual Plan, Discussion Thread

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But there's no back button... If it wasn't for that I'd agree with you (but I'd still prefer Android even if iOS had a back button).

lol. so, in other words, the back button is not really a concern for you.  I have 2 lines on IOS already and they seem to love it more than Android.  The back button never seemed to be an issue for anyone in my family that uses IOS. 

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lol. so, in other words, the back button is not really a concern for you.  I have 2 lines on IOS already and they seem to love it more than Android.  The back button never seemed to be an issue for anyone in my family that uses IOS. 

 

It's a concern because I have an iPhone for work, and it's my #1 problem with the platform. There are other features on Android that I like that makes me prefer it for my personal phone, and when I'm up for upgrade at work in a couple of months I'll be picking the Pixel or a Note 8 (if the Note 8 is offered).

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But there's no back button... If it wasn't for that I'd agree with you (but I'd still prefer Android even if iOS had a back button).

There's actually a "back button" in Safari. Swipe right from the left side of the screen.

 

To go "forward", swipe left from the right side of the screen.

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There's actually a "back button". Swipe right from the left side of the screen.

I know there's a back button on Iphone screen.  I was thinking he didn't like Iphone because there's not a "physical" back button. 

 

The only reason I didn't like apple products in the past because they are overpriced.  Now Android products cost the same price, it's time for me to go to Iphone. 

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There's actually a "back button" in Safari. Swipe right from the left side of the screen.

 

To go "forward", swipe left from the right side of the screen.

 

Lots of individual apps have back buttons or gestures, but usually they're in the top left corner of the phone. With the Plus models of iPhones it's a tough reach, and you have to resort to double tapping the home button to reach or using 2 hands. It's the permanent back button--software, capacitive, or clicky-- that irks me.

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I know there's a back button on Iphone screen.  I was thinking he didn't like Iphone because there's not a "physical" back button. 

 

The only reason I didn't like apple products in the past because they are overpriced.  Now Android products cost the same price, it's time for me to go to Iphone. 

While I discourage making design changes for the sake of making changes (hears lookin at you Google) and being 

consistent is great and all, Apple just takes this to a whole nother level with iOS design.

This is even worse than the single button mouse...

 

W394kUPm.jpg

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I'm in a meeting right and audibly LOLed. Not good.

 

Thanks for the bright moment in an otherwise boring day.

 

I have chuckled in several meetings glancing through S4GRU over the past 5+ years.   :blush:

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I'm in a meeting right and audibly LOLed. Not good.

I have chuckled in several meetings glancing through S4GRU over the past 5+ years.   :blush:

 

S4GRU.  Costing millions in lost productivity since 2012.

 

giphy.gif

 

AJ

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It's definitely Virgin Mobile USA.

 

Dow Draper, CEO of Virgin Mobile USA, tweeted this recently: https://twitter.com/DowDraper/status/877409795984179201

 

It's on the website too: https://www.virginmobileusa.com

I think this was a good decision. It helps to further separate Virgin Mobile and Boost Mobile.

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Marcelo was on stage with Masa in front of SoftBank employees in Tokyo.

 

https://twitter.com/marceloclaure/status/877626944766054402

 

One slide said "Future of Sprint".

 

This has a whole "next chapter" feel to it.

Hope next chapter is more LTE in more places.

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A GMO here in Missouri was just converted to a full tri-band site recently. Band 26 just came online today. Adding more evidence that work is being done on the network now in case anyone is still skeptical. 

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One of the things I've written alot about here on S4GRU, is my dislike for wireless retail stores in general, and one of the biggest reasons for some of my past switching between carriers, was due to a bad experience/situation involving some error made at the store level when I'd sign up for wireless service in a store. Nowadays, I've pledged that I'll only buy online or over the phone, as typically things work out better that way. I would hope though that the negatives in wireless and home internet would get fixed, especially from my experiences, which I believe would more likely happen if more resources would be dedicated to the technical issues and less towards physical retail, focusing more online.

 

However, I do believe there is a need for some retail stores, where carriers could either go more elaborate with additional offerings to draw people in, or simplify to just the basics to make retail as inexpensive as possible, while still providing a physical presence for people to go to if they really want to try out devices in person, or simply prefer not to order online.

 

Either way a carrier decides to go, its important to make a store look presentable. All carriers have stores that look good and those that look really bad. In the case of Sprint, most of the stores I've been too don't look very good, in my opinion. However, I went into the store on Roosevelt Road yesterday (here in the Chicago suburbs), which probably is the smallest Sprint store I've ever seen, yet definitely the best appearence that looked nothing like any other carrier store.

 

I wish I would have taken a photo to post here, and I may go back sometime and get one. I think if Sprint is set to expand retail as they've announced, they'd be smart to model them after that store, as it was very compact, yet well designed so customers are right near access to the devices, unlike these new huge stores carriers have in expecting customers to walk all around from one area to another just to look at stuff.

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One of the things I've written alot about here on S4GRU, is my dislike for wireless retail stores in general, and one of the biggest reasons for some of my past switching between carriers, was due to a bad experience/situation involving some error made at the store level when I'd sign up for wireless service in a store. Nowadays, I've pledged that I'll only buy online or over the phone, as typically things work out better that way. I would hope though that the negatives in wireless and home internet would get fixed, especially from my experiences, which I believe would more likely happen if more resources would be dedicated to the technical issues and less towards physical retail, focusing more online.

 

However, I do believe there is a need for some retail stores, where carriers could either go more elaborate with additional offerings to draw people in, or simplify to just the basics to make retail as inexpensive as possible, while still providing a physical presence for people to go to if they really want to try out devices in person, or simply prefer not to order online.

 

Either way a carrier decides to go, its important to make a store look presentable. All carriers have stores that look good and those that look really bad. In the case of Sprint, most of the stores I've been too don't look very good, in my opinion. However, I went into the store on Roosevelt Road yesterday (here in the Chicago suburbs), which probably is the smallest Sprint store I've ever seen, yet definitely the best appearence that looked nothing like any other carrier store.

 

I wish I would have taken a photo to post here, and I may go back sometime and get one. I think if Sprint is set to expand retail as they've announced, they'd be smart to model them after that store, as it was very compact, yet well designed so customers are right near access to the devices, unlike these new huge stores carriers have in expecting customers to walk all around from one area to another just to look at stuff.

Funny my thinking is the opposite..

 

Stores.... Generally have what you need in stock

Face to face contact (harder for someone to pull something)  and you can get "most" times the same person to fix what was screwed up...

 

Online/over the phone... wait for shipping, HOPE the next guy you talk to, to activate or change/switch devices speaks english

read the prior about WHO you talk to 

Changing websites way to often.. (and the change usually sucks more then the previous one) 

 

 

This last switch back to sprint, I did online/email/over phone.... To begin with FANTASTIC.... After.. I have had a few bumps that have turned to freaking Mount Everest because people truly dont know their shit... AND my sales guy has been a no show, and I am Pissed. I have asked for a new one.. Nothing yet..

 

Only saving grace of the email/online thing.... I have a better saved paper trail...

 

Real quick.. Had someone in my group want to do a BYOD (trying to save money)  changed his mind and went with the LG g6 50% off.....The sales guy said we could do it.. week later no phone...   OH MY BAD ONLY FOR SWITCHED LINES THAT SWITCH RIGHT THEN (he had switched but changed his mind a few weeks later.... Anyway worked around that.. (new line which he is crediting me)  got the phone, called in to switch the 2 numbers around.  His line to the new Phone, new number to his old phone....  Dude on the phone SCREWED UP 4 LINES DOING THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!  THEN ARGUED WITH ME ABOUT IT!!!!!  Almost 2 hours for something as simple as a swap around.....

 

Just an example...

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Certainly not everything over the phone is perfect.

 

For example, my mother and I have been dealing with a sudden very odd loss in my Xfinity home internet download speed, while the upload speed has been just fine/the same 30mbps it has been since getting the service some months ago after realizing AT&T's home internet offerings in this area weren't going to be fast enough for 4k streaming, otherwise we would have kept it along with the AT&T wireless bundle we had.

 

We spent several hours on the phone with Xfinity the other day trying to fix this problem, and they are incredibly difficult to deal with, and nothing has been resolved about it so far. My mother had a different issue with them some years ago, but with the same frustrations over the phone. So, she went into one of their local tech dispatch offices to complain, and got the issue taken care of right away.

 

This is where having retail does still have value, in providing a place for customers to at least discuss issues with someone in person. Problem is though, most carriers haven't been training these salespeople in tech support knowledge like they use to, and now going into stores for that is becoming more often useless. I definitely support a return of in-store helpful tech support as giving more purpose to these places than as just a sales outlet.

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A GMO here in Missouri was just converted to a full tri-band site recently. Band 26 just came online today. Adding more evidence that work is being done on the network now in case anyone is still skeptical.

^^^ can corroborate. I've seen a couple of permits to do this around Charlotte. (At least one was canceled but still it's progress.)

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I have signal detector logs and SCP that say B41 is wide spread on the western part of the state. 70% of Newtown and Monroe area is covered. 90% of the interstate between Waterbury and Tunxis Community College is covered with B41 not "small spots". 100% LTE coverage the last time I went into West CT since I started a massive signal detector logs collection. Which I was in the Monroe area and up to past Tunxis Community College. A lot of B41 sites around Bridgeport. West Haven had the first B41 3rd carrier in ALU markets. Windsor Locks has a decent network the last couple years I have worked up there 4 or 5 weeks a year.

 

The maps are sponsor level different color pins for different tech.

Conn coverage is unacceptable. You are giving us spots- yes there is b41 in Ct considering it was there years ago now it's isn't on par with the other 2(3) companies. I drive it on the reg and it's spotty. Spotty as in some here and some there. 91 corridor isn't that bad, but there are way to many place people go with iffy coverage. Let's not forget it's a small state in a major market so why so long to get coverage together? It baffles me how some cities like Chicago have all deployment but here where there are major cities in such close proximity they haven't deployed like Chicago for example.

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One of the things I've written alot about here on S4GRU, is my dislike for wireless retail stores in general,

My main gripe with Sprint retail stores is that most of them are 3rd party, which makes them useless for almost everything. If you have a billing issue or need a phone issue resolved, their first solution is to sell you a new phone. Their second solution is to send you to a corporate store.

 

Sprint should find a way to get an Assurion agent in each store for phone repairs or technical guidance.

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My main gripe with Sprint retail stores is that most of them are 3rd party, which makes them useless for almost everything. If you have a billing issue or need a phone issue resolved, their first solution is to sell you a new phone. Their second solution is to send you to a corporate store.

 

Sprint should find a way to get an Assurion agent in each store for phone repairs or technical guidance.

Having a wireless insurance agent in each store is a great idea. I don't even mind the idea of Sprint, or any carrier stores for that matter, deciding against an all-in-one training approach in favor of specialists, so long as it doesn't require having to hire too many employees bringing up the cost of retail.

 

The other issue I have with carrier stores, is the huge size of these stores nowadays in terms of wasted space. Verizon and AT&T seem to be the worst in this regard, while Sprint is a bit better. T-Mobile stores I think do the best in terms of maximizing space and make it easy to navigate between areas with device counters.

 

Still, while I like the concept of having a store serve multiple purposes, so long as the physical space is compact enough with easy navigation, my visit to the Roosevelt Road Sprint store yesterday made me rethink the possibility for Sprint to make an example for all the wireless carriers not go down this ridiculous "lifestyle center" route AT&T and Verizon have been doing lately with their large stores.

 

Everything in the Sprint store I went to yesterday was very compact, yet still had enough walking space to get around. It didn't have the drab grey appearence I've seen in so many Sprint stores I've seen elsewhere around here. Instead, it had a stylish black and yellow design scheme, with a lowered square strip pattern with attached lighting, which was a few feet away/under from the above ceiling. It was very stylish, with a massive register counter. It almost looked like a fancy sports shop kind-of appearence. I really like the store, and I'm pretty sure it was corporate too.

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My main gripe with Sprint retail stores is that most of them are 3rd party, which makes them useless for almost everything. If you have a billing issue or need a phone issue resolved, their first solution is to sell you a new phone. Their second solution is to send you to a corporate store.

 

Sprint should find a way to get an Assurion agent in each store for phone repairs or technical guidance.

every service and repair Corp store has Assyrian employees

 

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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Having a wireless insurance agent in each store is a great idea. I don't even mind the idea of Sprint, or any carrier stores for that matter, deciding against an all-in-one training approach in favor of specialists, so long as it doesn't require having to hire too many employees bringing up the cost of retail.

 

The other issue I have with carrier stores, is the huge size of these stores nowadays in terms of wasted space. Verizon and AT&T seem to be the worst in this regard, while Sprint is a bit better. T-Mobile stores I think do the best in terms of maximizing space and make it easy to navigate between areas with device counters.

 

Still, while I like the concept of having a store serve multiple purposes, so long as the physical space is compact enough with easy navigation, my visit to the Roosevelt Road Sprint store yesterday made me rethink the possibility for Sprint to make an example for all the wireless carriers not go down this ridiculous "lifestyle center" route AT&T and Verizon have been doing lately with their large stores.

 

Everything in the Sprint store I went to yesterday was very compact, yet still had enough walking space to get around. It didn't have the drab grey appearence I've seen in so many Sprint stores I've seen elsewhere around here. Instead, it had a stylish black and yellow design scheme, with a lowered square strip pattern with attached lighting, which was a few feet away/under from the above ceiling. It was very stylish, with a massive register counter. It almost looked like a fancy sports shop kind-of appearence. I really like the store, and I'm pretty sure it was corporate too.

what you are describing is the brand new store model which is rolling out. there is some stores near me slated for it later this year which is pretty cool.

 

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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every service and repair Corp store has Assyrian employees

 

Are the insurance claim forms written in cuneiform?

 

AJ

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Are the insurance claim forms written in cuneiform?

 

AJ

ducking autocorrect lol

 

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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Looks like Sprint picked Samsung to be its preferred vendor for Massive MIMO: http://www.rcrwireless.com/20170620/news/sprint-and-samsung-set-to-roll-out-massive-mimo-tag4/amp

 

......

 

Roll out planned for next year

Saw said Sprint plans to roll out massive MIMO next year in the U.S., deploying Samsung radios with up to 128 antenna elements at cell sites that need more capacity. He said that because the antenna elements are so small, they can be tightly integrated with the radios, meaning that the carrier will not purchase separate antennas from other vendors.

 

“We are expecting to get the fully equipped system from vendors like Samsung,” said Saw. Sprint also works with infrastructure vendors Nokia and Ericsson, and has conducted massive MIMO tests with Nokia. But Saw said Samsung has a unique advantage.

 

“Samsung is unique because not only do they provide the infrastructure, but they also have some really cool handsets,” said Saw. Samsung’s Galaxy S7 phones were the first to leverage 4×4 MIMO. Smartphones that are equipped with multiple antenna elements should benefit the most from massive MIMO, although the technology is expected to boost capacity for all users.

 

.....

 

This was also interesting:

 

Sprint wants to use wireless backhaul for its small cells, and said that the Magic Box units will employ user equipment relay. According to Saw, Sprint intends to use massive MIMO for UE relay for all its small cell deployments.

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  • Posts

    • Because you simply have to plug it in to a power outlet near a window. 
    • Except for a soft hand off to thw macro network. It can't do that, but other than that, there exactly the same. 
    • Because public WiFi has an ongoing maintance cost, plus the cost to set it up and properly isolate it from your network. The magic box is just easier. You aren't responsible for it. The magic box (via LTE) also has vastly superior QoS so that one person won't bog it down.

      My parents house is one place where a magic box works amazingly. Their only internet option is 3 mbps DSL. B26 only on phones, and that's upstairs only. The magic box latches on to b25 and provides 15-30 Mbps consistently. They actually use it now with a Sprint mobile broadband plan. For some people, the magic box is a better solution than an Airave or wifi calling (which won't work well on 3 mbps DSL if someone is using the internet). For businesses, it's a $0 cost, easy deployment to help customers. And they aren't responsible for what people do on it.

      Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

    • Because if you're not offering public WiFi, why would you go out of your way to set up a Magic Box??
    • I really don't see why it is that you think that if you don't have public wifi then you wouldn't use an MB. The MagicBox is a repeater for Sprint's network requiring essential zero exposure or expenditure for the retail provider beyond electricity. It is also zero maintenance or setup. It's a highly superior solution in my view.
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