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Marcelo Claure, Town Hall Meetings, New Family Share Pack Plan, Unlimited Individual Plan, Discussion Thread

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Indeed. How is Best Buy is offering better pricing on this than Sprint?

Sprint and Best Buy have a pretty good relationship.

 

Sent from my Sprint LG G4

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No, that was not the point.

My point is the competition has a family plan with unlimited data, and Sprint does not from what I can see. You pointing out Sprint does not have family plans with unlimited data just repeats what I said.

 

When I went to the Sprint store yesterday they had this big banner advertising Open World

That's great if all potential customers are walking through the doors and all stores are using the banner. I suspect a great many people investigate a carrier via its web site first before taking the drive to the store. Sprint should brag about it as a feature of its plans on the plans page.

 

I have to pay for more high speed data if I want to stream my music from a non authorized T-mobile source, such as from a computer at home. Giving unrestricted access to certain things on the Internet violates the spirit of Net Neutrality, in my opinion.

T-Mo's offer to not meter music traffic from specific sites is no more a violation of net neutrality than me streaming a music service to my home PC all year long. The only difference is T-Mo is the ISP. They're paying for the infrastructure and connection to the backbone. It normally charges for metered traffic but is eating the cost on the unmetered traffic.

 

Voice traffic is normally metered on Sprint. (Means more back in the day when plans were more likely to have monthly allotted minutes.) Calls to Sprint customer service did not count against your minutes. Violation of neutrality? No.

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My point is the competition has a family plan with unlimited data, and Sprint does not from what I can see. You pointing out Sprint does not have family plans with unlimited data just repeats what I said. That's great if all potential customers are walking through the doors and all stores are using the banner. I suspect a great many people investigate a carrier via its web site first before taking the drive to the store. Sprint should brag about it as a feature of its plans on the plans page. T-Mo's offer to not meter music traffic from specific sites is no more a violation of net neutrality than me streaming a music service to my home PC all year long. The only difference is T-Mo is the ISP. They're paying for the infrastructure and connection to the backbone. It normally charges for metered traffic but is eating the cost on the unmetered traffic.Voice traffic is normally metered on Sprint. (Means more back in the day when plans were more likely to have monthly allotted minutes.) Calls to Sprint customer service did not count against your minutes. Violation of neutrality? No.

I think you sorely misunderstand Net Neutrality. Tomorrow if your preferred music service is no longer that, or something better comes along your SOL. This brings balance to the equation, your ISP should never decide what traffic is preferred, thats a dangerous path that could lead to some ugly conclusions.
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My point is the competition has a family plan with unlimited data, and Sprint does not from what I can see. You pointing out Sprint does not have family plans with unlimited data just repeats what I said.

You said Sprint did not include tethering on share plans. But they do. That was the point of the post.

 

T-Mo's offer to not meter music traffic from specific sites is no more a violation of net neutrality than me streaming a music service to my home PC all year long. The only difference is T-Mo is the ISP. They're paying for the infrastructure and connection to the backbone. It normally charges for metered traffic but is eating the cost on the unmetered traffic.

 

Voice traffic is normally metered on Sprint. (Means more back in the day when plans were more likely to have monthly allotted minutes.) Calls to Sprint customer service did not count against your minutes. Violation of neutrality? No.

The point of Net Neutrality is all data is treated equally. See AJ's post.

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You said Sprint did not include tethering on share plans. But they do. That was the point of the post.

Interesting this is being discussed at this current moment because I was wondering the same thing myself.

 

I just changed over our plan from ED 1500 to the 40GB Family Share Pack ($20 /mo cheaper!) . I had put tethering on my phone for $20 /mo on my old plan but they made me take it off when I switched.

 

Does tethering just take the data out of my bucket as if I was using it on my device? Or is it a lower allotment? I wasn't able to find anything on this specifically when I was looking online. (Or I just wasn't looking hard enough lol)

 

Tethering is a really nice option for me to have especially when my internet goes out and I'm working remotely, or decide to go down to the park and work from there. I really hope I still have a decent tethering allotment with this new plan.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Interesting this is being discussed at this current moment because I was wondering the same thing myself.

 

I just changed over our plan from ED 1500 to the 40GB Family Share Pack ($20 /mo cheaper!) . I had put tethering on my phone for $20 /mo on my old plan but they made me take it off when I switched.

 

Does tethering just take the data out of my bucket as if I was using it on my device? Or is it a lower allotment? I wasn't able to find anything on this specifically when I was looking online. (Or I just wasn't looking hard enough lol)

 

Tethering is a really nice option for me to have especially when my internet goes out and I'm working remotely, or decide to go down to the park and work from there. I really hope I still have a decent tethering allotment with this new plan.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It just comes out of your allotment.

 

Sent from my Sprint LG G4

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It just comes out of your allotment.

 

Sent from my Sprint LG G4

Fantastic. Sure as hell beats paying $20 /mo for a paltry 2GB of tethering data as I was previously on ED1500.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Interesting this is being discussed at this current moment because I was wondering the same thing myself.

 

I just changed over our plan from ED 1500 to the 40GB Family Share Pack ($20 /mo cheaper!)

What you do with that 40GB is up to you. Stream videos, check email, listen to music, or tether. It's your data, you paid for it.

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I think you sorely misunderstand Net Neutrality. Tomorrow if your preferred music service is no longer that, or something better comes along your SOL. This brings balance to the equation, your ISP should never decide what traffic is preferred, thats a dangerous path that could lead to some ugly conclusions.

Gratis and preferred are not the same thing. Music streaming traffic is not preferred; it is being provided at no charge. It's like a cab driver turning to you at the end of ride and says "No charge." Outside it being free, there was nothing special or different about the ride.

 

A closer example of a violation of net neutrality would be limiting traffic, say limiting video streaming to 600kbps, and requiring a fee to break the limit.

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uploadfromtaptalk1443147560207.jpg

 

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

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Gratis and preferred are not the same thing. Music streaming traffic is not preferred; it is being provided at no charge. It's like a cab driver turning to you at the end of ride and says "No charge." Outside it being free, there was nothing special or different about the ride.

 

A closer example of a violation of net neutrality would be limiting traffic, say limiting video streaming to 600kbps, and requiring a fee to break the limit.

I think that is a bad analogy because it doesn't include the requirement to use services to get that free ride. The reason this is an issue is because T-Mobile effectively drives users on the network to certain providers of services such as the already mentioned music services. It also plays favorites with the Ookla Speedtest.net App being exempted but others such as Sensorly Speedtest are not. Thus it is no longer neutral in providing bandwidth as it disincentivizes apps that are not exempted and further it raises unfair barriers to entry for new apps that may have otherwise been on even footing aside from established apps having a larger userbase.

 

Sorry but I simply don't buy the 'no harm because it is free!' Line of thought on net neutrality because it is an incomplete line of thinking that assumes no potential harm is being done.

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I think that is a bad analogy because it doesn't include the requirement to use services to get that free ride. The reason this is an issue is because T-Mobile effectively drives users on the network to certain providers of services such as the already mentioned music services. It also plays favorites with the Ookla Speedtest.net App being exempted but others such as Sensorly Speedtest are not. Thus it is no longer neutral in providing bandwidth as it disincentivizes apps that are not exempted and further it raises unfair barriers to entry for new apps that may have otherwise been on even footing aside from established apps having a larger userbase.

 

Sorry but I simply don't buy the 'no harm because it is free!' Line of thought on net neutrality because it is an incomplete line of thinking that assumes no potential harm is being done.

I was pretty sure sensorly was exempted too. I could swear that it didnt count againsts my accounts usage. Ill have to check again. Thats beside the point though that tmobile is prioritizing data. It doesn't give smaller music companies a chance if there not on the music freedon list. People would rather be on the company that doesnt count againsts there data limit

 

Sent from my SM-G925P using Tapatalk

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What's the new URL for network. Sprint.com.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

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What's the new URL for network. Sprint.com.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

 

There isn't one. You have to have a search bookmarked, such as https://network.sprint.com/search/60612

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I was pretty sure sensorly was exempted too. I could swear that it didnt count againsts my accounts usage. Ill have to check again. Thats beside the point though that tmobile is prioritizing data. It doesn't give smaller music companies a chance if there not on the music freedon list. People would rather be on the company that doesnt count againsts there data limit

 

Sent from my SM-G925P using Tapatalk

If you're cynical about it like I am you would just assume they exempted Speedtest apps so users can't tell how slow their connection is when they are being throttled.
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If you're cynical about it like I am you would just assume they exempted Speedtest apps so users can't tell how slow their connection is when they are being throttled.

That's what they did originally. They showed regular speed even when u were being throttled. The FCC made them stop though so now if your throttled then it will show ur throttled speed in the test

 

Sent from my SM-G925P using Tapatalk

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There isn't one. You have to have a search bookmarked, such as https://network.sprint.com/search/60612

Is this information current?

 

Sprint needs to update the formatting of this site and integrate it into: http://www.sprint.com/netdotcom/#!/

 

http://www.sprint.com/netdotcom/#!/ also needs to be readily accessible from the main Sprint home page.

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Is this information current?

 

Sprint needs to update the formatting of this site and integrate it into: http://www.sprint.com/netdotcom/#!/

 

http://www.sprint.com/netdotcom/#!/ also needs to be readily accessible from the main Sprint home page.

 

Yes it's current.

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If you're cynical about it like I am you would just assume they exempted Speedtest apps so users can't tell how slow their connection is when they are being throttled.

Ookla is exempted but other speed tests are not. Opensignal and Sensorly definitely count. I can tell being a T-Mobile user.

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Yes it's current.

Any word on why it's been largely hidden from view?

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Any word on why it's been largely hidden from view?

Same reason every single other carrier doesn't show their cell tower locations on a publicly accessible Web page. Its time has run out.

 

Sent from my Nexus 5

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Same reason every single other carrier doesn't show their cell tower locations on a publicly accessible Web page. Its time has run out.

Sent from my Nexus 5

Apologies, but not sure what you mean by "Its time has run out".

 

Why is this information still publicly available/accessible via search? Is this an oversight by Sprint?

 

Sprint could easily delete it otherwise, right?

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Sprint could be 'formidable' after merger with cable company, CEO says

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/sprint-could-formidable-merger-cable-205130142.html

It makes sense for a partnership in a lot of ways. However I'd much rather it be Charter and Malone while Son retains majority ownership over Sprint. I'm surprised his name isn't getting tossed into T-Mobile and Sprint rumors more.

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It makes sense for a partnership in a lot of ways. However I'd much rather it be Charter and Malone while Son retains majority ownership over Sprint. I'm surprised his name isn't getting tossed into T-Mobile and Sprint rumors more.

Yes, that would make plenty of sense. Charter is still busy digesting TWC I suppose.

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