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Network Vision/LTE - New York City Market

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Ok well now I am leaving work and Just got 2mbps down. It says I am now on sector 4098 instead of 4099. Channel 675 instead of 425.

 

Also it is later and everyone has gone home from work. So I don't know what to make of this. There are only two NV antennas on top of this building and there is one legacy antenna still left in the middle.

 

Those two different sectors are on the same site, but on different sectors and channels. Interesting. Keep us posted on the differebt variables.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

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Ok just did one where it was flipped onto 4099 and ch.425 again. (Interesting, when I walk into a certain area of my office, it switches to these sectors/channels). This time I got 2mbps down again. This is the same channel/sector that gave me <200kbps earlier today. Hate to break bad news but really seems like a congestion problem is still happening on this tower despite NV.

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Ok just did one where it was flipped onto 4099 and ch.425 again. (Interesting' date=' when I walk into a certain area of my office, it switches to these sectors/channels). This time I got 2mbps down again. This is the same channel/sector that gave me <200kbps earlier today. Hate to break bad news but really seems like a congestion problem is still happening on this tower despite NV.[/quote']

 

It very well could be. There may not be enough carriers deployed. Monitor it for a week or so. If it continues all on sectors that start with 409, then you know its always the same site. Then call Sprint and complain. Because additional carrier cards can solve this problem if NV backhaul is in place.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

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It very well could be. There may not be enough carriers deployed. Monitor it for a week or so. If it continues all on sectors that start with 409, then you know its always the same site. Then call Sprint and complain. Because additional carrier cards can solve this problem if NV backhaul is in place.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

 

I'm sorry, but I thought that was supposed to be PART OF NV? Or are they so stupid they would like to keep paying people to go back to the same site over and over again, instead of doing it in one shot? Kind of like their "band-aid" fixes. Please tell me why they are adding T-1 lines, only to be ripping them out when NV comes in a few months (years? decades?)

 

Same crap today on 4099, 4098, and 4097. Good in the morning, <200kbps during the day, and back to good when everyone went home. I'm not going to call and complain, because its not like me calling is actually going to make them add a carrier card. This is the last chance I (and many others) are giving them, they can get NV right or they will lose me as a customer. I was so happy when I saw the new antennas, but man did they let me down. So far, I'm not impressed with "Network Vision"...

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I'm sorry, but I thought that was supposed to be PART OF NV? Or are they so stupid they would like to keep paying people to go back to the same site over and over again, instead of doing it in one shot? Kind of like their "band-aid" fixes. Please tell me why they are adding T-1 lines, only to be ripping them out when NV comes in a few months (years? decades?)

 

Same crap today on 4099, 4098, and 4097. Good in the morning, <200kbps during the day, and back to good when everyone went home. I'm not going to call and complain, because its not like me calling is actually going to make them add a carrier card. This is the last chance I (and many others) are giving them, they can get NV right or they will lose me as a customer. I was so happy when I saw the new antennas, but man did they let me down. So far, I'm not impressed with "Network Vision"...

 

Well you also can take into account that the tower you are connected to is the only one in that area that has been upgraded so that tower has to take on all the connections by itself, once they surround that tower with other network visión towers they will be able to better distribute the bandwidth between the towers and you will see better speeds... I hope.

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I'm sorry, but I thought that was supposed to be PART OF NV? Or are they so stupid they would like to keep paying people to go back to the same site over and over again, instead of doing it in one shot? Kind of like their "band-aid" fixes. Please tell me why they are adding T-1 lines, only to be ripping them out when NV comes in a few months (years? decades?)

 

Same crap today on 4099, 4098, and 4097. Good in the morning, <200kbps during the day, and back to good when everyone went home. I'm not going to call and complain, because its not like me calling is actually going to make them add a carrier card. This is the last chance I (and many others) are giving them, they can get NV right or they will lose me as a customer. I was so happy when I saw the new antennas, but man did they let me down. So far, I'm not impressed with "Network Vision"...

 

Let's just say for the sake of argument that the new NV backhaul is hooked up and you are getting your results (which we don't even know). You do realize they have yet to light up a 5x5mhz chunk of spectrum on LTE(which is more efficient than EVDO?) which you will be riding on once it goes live. Realistically, that is a decent chunk of capacity(~37mb/s) that will be added and I think you're being premature and dramatic in your assessment. And obviously outside of that, more EVDO carriers can be added via NV and we don't even know if the new hardware is broadcasting.

Edited by Boosted20V
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Let's just say for the sake of argument that the new NV backhaul is hooked up and you are getting your results (which we don't even know). You do realize they have yet to light up a 5x5mhz chunk of spectrum on LTE(which is more efficient than EVDO?) which you will be riding on once it goes live. Realistically, that is a decent chunk of capacity(~37mb/s) that will be added and I think you're being premature and dramatic in your assessment. And obviously outside of that, more EVDO carriers can be added via NV and we don't even know if the new hardware is broadcasting.

 

Well it's listed as complete and also the pings are very low, which I think is something that is typically seen on the nv equipment ?

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Well it's listed as complete and also the pings are very low, which I think is something that is typically seen on the nv equipment ?

 

In that case, then you're absolutely correct that current carrier capacity is maxed out there. However, as I stated before, much relief will be because of the additional 10 mhz of spectrum used for LTE. Backhaul obviously isn't the limiting factor in all cases, in a city as dense as NY, I imagine all carriers have issues keeping every served.

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Look, the bottom line is if there are not enough carriers to handle the load, Sprint needs to know so they can add more. This is an easily fixable problem in most instances.

 

You are not being realistic. Sprint is adding additional carriers in Network Vision in places where they are needed. However, they cannot determine how much usage will occur on a site after its starts running well. They can only make an educated guess. They may even have to add more carriers than they anticipated. People start using their devices more and more when data returns, and usage skyrockets.

 

I don't know if you realize, but even Verizon adds EVDO carriers to sites based on feedback it gets from customers. The Verizon site near my house dropped to 200k downloads. My friend complained to Verizon several times, but they eventually added another carrier and speeds are back above 1mbps.

 

Wireless networks and specific site performance is dynamic. Every carrier will experience capacity issues and need to add carriers.

 

That being said, all the other points made about additional sites coming online and LTE are true and will help 3G capacity and performance as well.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

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This pattern has been pretty consistent..

 

th_Screenshot_2012-09-07-12-12-401.png

 

 

Look, the bottom line is if there are not enough carriers to handle the load, Sprint needs to know so they can add more. This is an easily fixable problem in most instances.

 

You are not being realistic. Sprint is adding additional carriers in Network Vision in places where they are needed. However, they cannot determine how much usage will occur on a site after its starts running well. They can only make an educated guess. They may even have to add more carriers than they anticipated. People start using their devices more and more when data returns, and usage skyrockets.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

 

How am I not being realistic? It is not my job as a Sprint customer to monitor their network performance for them. That is something they should be doing themselves. Your telling me they have no way of knowing a tower is overburdened besides customers calling and complaining?

 

I guess I'll just wait and see what LTE brings.

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This pattern has been pretty consistent..

 

 

How am I not being realistic? It is not my job as a Sprint customer to monitor their network performance for them. That is something they should be doing themselves. Your telling me they have no way of knowing a tower is overburdened besides customers calling and complaining?

 

I guess I'll just wait and see what LTE brings.

 

I didn't say they do not have any way. The new network is very immature and just starting to be deployed. What I did say is that leaving Sprint will not relieve you of the burden of ever having to report an overburdened carrier. Networks are dynamic and loads ebb and flow. On all networks. Period.

 

With 38,000 sites, Sprint will have a hard time monitoring the network to the degree many people would like. And Sprint will likely eventually discover that the site is overburdened and needs new carriers on its own. However, you would likely speed up the process by reporting it and get a ticket opened up. But if you want to wait until it works itself out, that's fine.

 

I was stuck at <3Mbps speeds on Verizon LTE for my hot spot for two weeks on one specific tower. After two weeks, I called them and reported it. The problem has been addressed and speeds are up to 9Mbps. I don't even know what they did, because I know they didn't add a LTE carrier.

 

I guess I could say that Verizon has a new state of the art LTE network and they just need to figure it out or I'm leaving. Or I can be realistic and report the issue. The choice is yours.

 

Some people are victims of their circumstances and run around and complain and throw up their arms. Others are victors over their circumstances and try to do something about it. Since you are a member of S4GRU, you have a lot of information to help you. What you choose to do with it is up to you.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

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This pattern has been pretty consistent..

 

th_Screenshot_2012-09-07-12-12-401.png

 

 

 

 

How am I not being realistic? It is not my job as a Sprint customer to monitor their network performance for them. That is something they should be doing themselves. Your telling me they have no way of knowing a tower is overburdened besides customers calling and complaining?

 

I guess I'll just wait and see what LTE brings.

 

quite frankly, and based purely on my hundreds of phone calls to Sprint, they seem to know very little about what their equipment is doing at any given time. every device my wife and I own, including our friends in this neighborhood, all get atrocious data speeds. every call to Sprint is met with an unflinching, "everything is working perfectly." it's not until hours are spent on the phone arguing with Sprint that they'll acknowledge a problem exists and even then the subsequent results are dubious. one of the biggest hurdles between Sprint and its customer's satisfaction is that it can be extremely difficult for the customer to actually get his point across in a way that will lead to any action.

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I've been complaining for years about poor data and dropped calls in my neighborhood.

It doesn't seem much ever gets done to improve the quality of service on the netwrok.

The only solution Sprint has for you is a free Airrave, the netowrk has only gotten worse over the years.

I wonder to myself sometimes how could they have let the sites be so neglected and overwhelmed?

Things like that don't just happen overnight, it's not just since the addition of the iPhone either.

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I've been with Sprint for over 12 years but they keep erroding all the nice perks they used to offer and keep nickel and diming customers. I truly hope NV will be the saving grace it's promised to be. T-Mobile is looking pretty attractive lately.

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I've been with Sprint for over 12 years but they keep erroding all the nice perks they used to offer and keep nickel and diming customers. I truly hope NV will be the saving grace it's promised to be. T-Mobile is looking pretty attractive lately.

 

I must admit T-Mobile is good but I think that their HSPA Network will slow down much like Sprint did when the EVO came out. Either that or I think that hey will go back to throttling LTE speeds and giving you unlimited HSPA because they don't want to constantly have to upgrade their network when the most data heavy users are slowing it down.

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I've been complaining for years about poor data and dropped calls in my neighborhood.

It doesn't seem much ever gets done to improve the quality of service on the netwrok.

The only solution Sprint has for you is a free Airrave, the netowrk has only gotten worse over the years.

I wonder to myself sometimes how could they have let the sites be so neglected and overwhelmed?

Things like that don't just happen overnight, it's not just since the addition of the iPhone either.

 

I think Sprint put a lot into the Wimax deployment done by Clearwire, which helped in areas where you could get a signal. Unfortunately, their network didn't receive the attention it needed. They are now trying to correct the issue. NV is a huge project that should resolve the data issues in most cases. I believe NV will also give Sprint more proactive monitoring of their towers performance so hopefully they can fix issues before people notice.

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...How do I do that?

 

While I realize there are a million towers here, the fact that I can see this particular tower out my window, (i.e. I am 100ft away from it), makes me doubt I would be connected to a different one. It was also down the other day (probably related to NV), which resulted in me only having 2 or 3 bars, as opposed to full signal which I have now (although I realize this displays 1X not Evdo signal).

 

It would think it should be illegal to say iphone 5 lte (provided iphone 5 does have lte) without explicitly telling people that lte isnt built until whenever in a person area.

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It would think it should be illegal to say iphone 5 lte (provided iphone 5 does have lte) without explicitly telling people that lte isnt built until whenever in a person area.

 

So nearly all of Sprint's phones are "illegal" because they are called 4G or 4G LTE?

 

I highly doubt that they will even call the iPhone LTE. They might go the way of the iPad and just call it "iPhone"

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It would think it should be illegal to say iphone 5 lte (provided iphone 5 does have lte) without explicitly telling people that lte isnt built until whenever in a person area.

 

Why? The device is LTE capable and works on LTE if the device goes into LTE coverage.

 

Robert via Samsung Galaxy S-III 32GB using Forum Runner

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So nearly all of Sprint's phones are "illegal" because they are called 4G or 4G LTE?

 

I highly doubt that they will even call the iPhone LTE. They might go the way of the iPad and just call it "iPhone"

 

Same can be said for Verizon and AT&T as well.

 

The network is coming, we know it, Sprint knows it, Apple knows it, hell, there was an announcement just made yesterday that lists NYC.

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I live in Yonkers NY just north of the bronx. I've been following the forums and on Sundays I check like every 15 minutes for updates. Thanks Robert. I just checked my S3 and EVO LTE and for the first time my network type changed to eHRPD. Very happy to see progress over here. Can I assume the antennas have been upgraded? Is this a sign that Backhaul has also been completed?

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Its nice to finally hear that we are showing signs of life for the deployment, this thread has become somewhat stagnant..As far as I know that is just in preparation of LTE..not necessarily meaning that its close to roll out, but progress nonetheless. What area of Yonkers did you receive the signal? I'm in the Bronx and have yet to see any eHRPD.

Edited by nexgencpu

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Same here. I've been receiving fast 3G Evdo but no eHRPD.

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I haven't been so lucky with my speed, im still getting sub par performance here in the BX, 200-400KB/s, pings all over the map from 70-500ms :td:

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It seems like the lte roll out in NY is moving a bit slow. I'm hoping to see the weekly numbers start increasing soon.

Here is the location where I'm getting eHRPD.

 

 

 

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

uploadfromtaptalk1348371326959.jpg

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      Here is the same view with the battery and cover installed. Notice that the SD card slot is covered by the
      battery cover.
       

      The opposite side has two switches. The one on the left is a WPS setup button while the one on the right is a slider to mute the unit.
       

       
      The unit sits nicely in the cradle and looks to me to be a solution to help keep the USB port for the charger/interface cable from failing. This has been a major issue with the prior Hotspots. The case of the unit also helps support the USB port to take some of the load off of the circuit board.
      It took quite a bit of digging on the Sierra Wireless site to find out that the antenna ports are for the 4G WiMax band only. The cradle contains 2 5dbi omnidirectional antennas to allow full use of the WiMax network architecture.
       
      Initial testing

      The initial testing of the unit looks promising. The antennas in the cradle for 4G WiMax actually seem to get 3 – 5dBm gain in all conditions tested. The new unit has the ability to search the other bands for signals while staying connected. This allows less downtime between band changes. I notice a lot less disruption when switching bands.
      This unit has better reception on 3G and 4G WiMax than the previous hotspots and even the U600 USB modem I use as well. 4G WiMax is able to connect quickly even at 10% and the cradle has improved stability of WiMax and decreased ping times. For a short time I had access to Sprint 4G LTE as they were testing the towers in my area. The speeds were incredilbly faster. A 10% 4G LTE signal averaged 8.12Mbps download and 1.85Mbps upload. An 80% signal was able to get 35.8Mbps down on my best test and 22.1Mbps up.
      The upload speeds was very unexpected, and much higher than Sprint LTE smartphone devices have reported. This is likely due to much stronger transmit capabilities of the hotspot. I also discovered that when the modem is tethered the cable limits the bandwidth to approximately 20Mbps total speed. It will be interesting to see how it works in the 12 to 14 hour days of hot Houston Weather.
       
      First week in the field
      The Tri Band Modem got pressed into service a little quicker than planned, as my main unit went down with a bad transmission and the U600 USB modem with a Cradlepoint that was in this unit appears to have been damaged by the wrecker’s radio which runs on the edge of the WiMax frequency at 5 watts. The units have been sent in to determine cause of failure and for repairs but I think next time I will make sure all electronics are powered off before getting that close to a transmitter (OUCH!!).
      I am running the same routes in a rental van with the Tri-Band Modem that I normally use the other units on. There is less downtime in the signal gaps I am familiar with and areas where I have had signal problems in both 3G and 4G WiMax are much improved. I have yet to encounter any more 4G LTE signals but am looking forward to the service coming online soon. The unit seems to be running hotter than I would like with a fully charged battery but is actually cooler that the previous Hotspots. The temperature is supposed to soar over the next few days without the cloudiness we have had this past week. So it will be interesting to see if the overheating problems of previous models still occur.
       
      Week 2 – The True test
      The unit is getting worked really hard this week with temperatures outside up near 100 degrees. The GPS is useless with this kind of sun load as the unit will overheat if left in direct sunlight (as the instructions state) in about 20 minutes. The good news is that this is about twice as long as my original Hotspot will last. How anyone can make a unit that requires a clear view of the sky for GPS but can’t handle sunlight is beyond comprehension. A quick check of the Tri-Band’s temperature specs shows that the unit is only rated for 95 degrees. The prior Hotspot was rated well above the century mark but couldn’t even handle 90 degrees for any length of time. The crappiest laptop on the market will handle 105 degrees plus all day long. The true test will be my afternoon calls when the temperatures are high. Battery life has been about 8 to 9 hours which is far better than the prior Hotspots.
      The unit started overheating one afternoon. I can’t say I’m a bit surprised at that, but what is surprising is that it will run steadily as long as the air temp is below 98 degrees. This is a first for Hotspots as they always overheated well before the rated temperature spec. The bad news is the crappy overheat shutdown doesn’t turn off the unit before damage starts to occur, nor does it turn the unit off completely.
      Removing the battery cover seems to help air circulation and overheating some. The button lights are flickering after one overheating but the unit seems to be working fine other than this. It will be interesting to see what happens when it really gets hot here.
      According to the specs 4G LTE takes the least amount of wattage to run so it may not overheat as fast when using 4G LTE. I had the chance to try the modem in the old school 3G EVDO mode as one of my locations is 40 feet underground and that is all that is available at this location. I shut the unit down after 30 minutes as the unit was so hot you could barely handle it even though the temperature underground is around 70 degrees. I would not recommend trying to use this for any length of time if you want the Tri-Band to not overheat!!
       
      My Opinion
      Although Sierra Wireless has made some major improvement in the 3rd generation Hotspot, this is still a unit for the casual user. It is not designed to handle heavy use or outdoor summer temperatures for any length of time. It will be going in my climate controlled cabinet to protect it from the heat next week. I will let you know how it works when the temperature stays below 85 degrees. The improvements in connectivity, reception and stability are worth the investment. As long as you know and adjust your usage for the limitations of the unit.
    • By pyroscott
      Sprint Nextel revealed their second quarter 2012 corporate earnings in a conference call to their investors today and S4GRU was covering for news on Network Vision.
      Network thinning of the iDEN network is complete, taking 1/3 of Nextel towers off air. The Nextel network was built to support 20 million subscribers, but was only supporting 4.4 million subscribers, so it could easily be thinned without [much] noticeable change in street coverage. Sprint also converted 60% of the Nextel subscriber loss into their Sprint subscriber base. Interestingly, they stated that Verizon has been the biggest poacher of subscribers leaving Nextel, grabbing 50% of former subscribers in the last 4 1/2 years. In that same timeframe, Sprint has grabbed 25%, AT&T 20% and T-Mobile 5%.
       
       
      On the Network Vision topic:
      4 additional cities will launch, including Baltimore, by the end of August.*Edit* Cities were disclosed VIA press release following the conference call. They are:
      Baltimore, MD Gainesville, GA Manhattan/Junction City, KS Sherman-Denison, TX  
      Over 2,000 sites are currently online with 12,000 sites to be online by the end of the year
      Network Vision towers are seeing 10-20% additional voice minutes usage per tower, overnight after activating Network Vision. This will equal roaming savings for Sprint, and ESMR will only increase that savings.
      CEO Dan Hesse confirmed that Sprint will be releasing the Motorola Photon Q "in the very near future." It will be a QWERTY slider "with robust business and consumer features." It will also be sporting world phone capability.
      Several hundred Network Vision sites are waiting for backhaul, and will turn on when the backhaul is installed, several hundred more sites have birds nesting on them and Sprint won't be able to turn them on until the birds leave, according to the conference call.
      Sprint sold 1.5 million iPhones during the quarter, even though other carriers saw slowing of sales with rumors ramping up that the new iPhone would support LTE. 40% of the iPhone sales were to new customers. They also stated that iPhone customers require less customer support and are expected to churn less than customers on other phones.
      Mr. Hesse confirmed that Sprint is not looking to change plans in the near future.
      Things are looking up for Sprint. This quarter saw their highest ARPU and their lowest churn rate to date. They posted a larger loss than Q1, but beat their revenue goals for Q2. For more detailed financial information, check the source link below.
       
      Source: http://investors.spr...spx?iid=4057219
      http://finance.yahoo...-141200985.html -Thanks to S4GRU sponsor marioc21 for finding this link!
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