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[Teaser] Life's Good with the V30

lilotimz

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Tim Yu
Sprint 4G Rollout Updates
September 5, 2017 - 6:45 PM PDT

It is that time of the year for flagship phablets and LG has returned to us with their brand new V30 smartphone. Unlike the LG G6, LG was not conservative with the specifications on this one.

Many other tech sites and forums have already broken down the V30 but here at S4GRU we are more interested in network technologies and the V30 is definitely no slouch in this regard.

Supported Technologies
GSM 850 / 1900
WCDMA Band: 2 / 4 / 5
LTE Band: 2 / 4 / 5 / 12 / 13 / 17 / 25 / 26 / 41

4x4 MIMO on Band 25 and Band 41 up to 10 streams
256 / 64 QAM DL-UL

HPUE 

2xCA B25
2xCA B41
3xCA B41

4xCA B41

That is right.

The LG V30 is the first device confirmed to support 4 carrier aggregation on Band 41.

No other device out there, including the ever more popular Galaxy S8 or Note 8, are confirmed to at least technologically support 4 carrier aggregation for Band 41 (though maybe a re-certification & software update can fix that). In addition, the LG V30 is also a "Gigabit Class" device that supports 4x4 MIMO over Band 41 for up to 10 total MIMO streams which the Galaxy S8 and Note 8 does not support (the GS8 and Note 8 are not "Gigabit Class" devices on Sprint).

Furthermore, note the inclusion of LTE Band 13. One may think this mean LTE roaming on Verizon may be in the cards, but recently Sprint consummated a partnership with Open Mobile based in Puerto Rico who holds Band 13 750 MHz spectrum. As the Puerto Rico market lacks SMR 800 spectrum needed for CDMA 1x 800 and LTE 800 Band 26, it seems likely that it may be a boutique Sprint market that will utilize 10x10 Band 13 750 MHz for low band coverage. An interesting development.

So network wise, the V30 sure seems like one heck of a device that supports just about every technology Sprint is poised to utilize right now in select markets and most of the network in the near future. A potentially splendid device for the Sprint network enthusiast.

FCC ID: LS998

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My next phone... Do we get Calling Plus is the big question. :)

I doubt we will see it from the get-go but hopefully not too long after its release.

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