Jump to content

The Wall

  • entries
    394
  • comments
    5,977
  • views
    4,737,921

Contributors to this blog

HTC EVO 4G LTE tech details revealed in FCC OET filing

WiWavelength

18,253 views

blog-0590528001334261523.jpg

by Andrew J. Shepherd

Sprint 4G Rollout Updates

Thursday, April 12, 2012 - 2:55 PM MDT

 

 

A few weeks ago, S4GRU was the first to bring you the news of the HTC codenamed "Jet" that was recently unveiled as the HTC EVO 4G LTE headed to Sprint this summer. Today, the EVO 4G LTE applications hit the FCC OET (Office of Engineering and Technology) database. S4GRU brings you the technical rundown, including some important revelations.

 

 

  • CDMA1X + EV-DO band classes 0, 1, 10 (i.e. CDMA1X + EV-DO 850/1900/800)
  • LTE band class 25 (i.e. LTE 1900; PCS A-G blocks)
  • LTE 5 MHz and 10 MHz channel bandwidths
  • LTE UE category 3
  • SVDO and SVLTE support, including SVDO or SVLTE and simultaneous 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi tether
  • Maximum RF ERP: 20.43 dBm (CDMA1X 850), 18.74 dBm (EV-DO 850), 22.98 dBm (CDMA1X 1900), 18.44 dBm (EV-DO 1900), 20.01 dBm (CDMA1X 800), 18.75 dBm (EV-DO 800), 19.85 dBm (LTE 1900)
  • Antenna gain: -2 dBi (CDMA1X 850/1900/800), -3.5 dBi (EV-DO 850/1900/800 and LTE 1900)
  • LTE antenna configuration 1x2 (i.e. 2x2 downlink MIMO)

107kgok.png

 

 

Prima facie analysis, no LTE 800 nor TD-LTE 2600 support comes as no surprise. But SVDO is a nice perk, as internal Sprint documents had not indicated its inclusion. Furthermore, SVDO/SVLTE plus simultaneous Wi-Fi tether capability really covers all of the connectivity bases. Most disappointing, however, is the rather low ERP output. While the EVO 4G LTE has a plethora of radio capabilities, it does not look to be a stellar RF performer, perhaps the consequence of the aluminum unibody in place of the polycarbonate unibody used in the more direct members of the HTC One X family of handsets.

 

Source: FCC

  • Like 9


24 Comments


Recommended Comments

For reference with respect to ERP, here is how the 4G LTE compares to the original HTC Evo 4G:

 

OG Evo 4G:

Channel 1013 (824.70 MHz): ERP=20.1 dBm, CDMA
Channel 384 (836.52 MHz): ERP=20.3 dBm, CDMA
Channel 777 (848.31 MHz): ERP=19.0 dBm, CDMA

 

Evo 4G LTE:

Channel 1013 (824.70 MHz): ERP=18.78 dBm H, 12.65 dBm V, CDMA
Channel 384 (836.52 MHz): ERP=20.43 dBm H, 14.16 dBm V, CDMA
Channel 777 (848.31 MHz): ERP=19.55 dBm H, 12.96 dBm V, CDMA

 

Source: https://apps.fcc.gov...html?id=1664039 and https://apps.fcc.gov...html?id=1278132

Share this comment


Link to comment

Doesn't SVDO connectivity mean that the device is capable of using Data and voice simultaneously over 3G?

Share this comment


Link to comment

Doesn't SVDO connectivity mean that the device is capable of using Data and voice simultaneously over 3G?

 

That's correct

Share this comment


Link to comment

So.. does it mean Sprint will upgrade their network to SVDO/SVLTE? I made this thread from http://s4gru.com/ind..._9675#entry9675 and I got different answers from them lol

 

SVDO and SVLTE is a device capability which is based on the SOC chip in the device which for the HTC EVO 4G LTE supports both in the MSM8960. It is not a network capability that is part of Network Vision.

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

So.. does it mean Sprint will upgrade their network to SVDO/SVLTE? I made this thread from http://s4gru.com/ind..._9675#entry9675 and I got different answers from them lol

 

Yeah I for the first time got some poor info from that guy on that part which i relayed in that thread...Guy works directly for Qualcomm and used to be closely associated with Sprint's qualcomm's devices but has since switched over to working on VZ's group and testing those at qualcomm...

 

But for those that want to see the SVDO discussed in the doc its in the main "SAR Test Report" listed there pretty clearly on page 7.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Since theres no support for LTE 800 and only LTE 1900 does that mean when sprint starts using LTE 800 it won't have 4G? Or is both LTE 800 and 1900 going to be used simultaneously. Would all site have both or only certain?

Share this comment


Link to comment

Since theres no support for LTE 800 and only LTE 1900 does that mean when sprint starts using LTE 800 it won't have 4G? Or is both LTE 800 and 1900 going to be used simultaneously. Would all site have both or only certain?

 

In my understanding, not all of the reorganization of the 800mhz block that sprint owns is complete for all areas. Also, the spectrum is not yet allowed to be sectioned into larger blocks required for LTE. (although the FCC is working on it) Sprint is including equipment into their Network Vision program that should essentially allow them to 'throw the switch' and turn on the 800Mhz LTE once all testing and clearances are done. When this happens, they will also be upgrading to LTE Advanced which will allow all bands to be aggregated and allow seamless use to the end consumer. All sites should eventually have both LTE 800 and LTE 1900, with customers that purchase phones now still having 4G, but the newest phones (released after LTE 800) should see much increased speed, building penetration, and coverage especially in rural areas.

Hopefully that helps.

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

For reference with respect to ERP, here is how the 4G LTE compares to the original HTC Evo 4G...

 

Nate, I was hopeful that someone would post that ERP comparison data because it is ripe for discussion (and it saves me some of the work of doing so myself).

 

That said, you posted Cellular 850 MHz ERP figures. (CEL 0384, 0777, and 1013 are all common CDMA1X/EV-DO 850 carrier channel assignments.) Cellular 850 MHz is not particularly illustrative, as the average EVO 4G LTE will spend relatively little of its life roaming on Cellular 850 MHz.

 

If instead we compare PCS 1900 MHz ERP, the original EVO 4G has max ERP of 25.0 dBm (CDMA1X) and 24.9 dBm (EV-DO), while the corresponding figures for the EVO 4G LTE are 22.98 dBm (CDMA1X) and 18.44 dBm (EV-DO). The EV-DO 1900 ERP difference, in particular, is massive.

 

For CDMA1X, EV-DO, W-CDMA, and HSPA mobile uplinks, I generally consider 23 dBm ERP to be standard, <23 dBm to be low, and >23 dBm to be high. In this case, the EVO 4G LTE falls into the low ERP category in all but CDMA1X 1900.

 

In the next day or so, I will follow up with more ERP comparison data from other devices.

 

AJ

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

But for those that want to see the SVDO discussed in the doc its in the main "SAR Test Report" listed there pretty clearly on page 7.

 

Here is the extracted chart:

 

oucrpe.png

 

AJ

Share this comment


Link to comment

For reference with respect to ERP, here is how the 4G LTE compares to the original HTC Evo 4G:OG Evo 4G:

Channel 1013 (824.70 MHz): ERP=20.1 dBm, CDMAChannel 384 (836.52 MHz): ERP=20.3 dBm, CDMAChannel 777 (848.31 MHz): ERP=19.0 dBm, CDMA

Evo 4G LTE:

Channel 1013 (824.70 MHz): ERP=18.78 dBm H, 12.65 dBm V, CDMAChannel 384 (836.52 MHz): ERP=20.43 dBm H, 14.16 dBm V, CDMAChannel 777 (848.31 MHz): ERP=19.55 dBm H, 12.96 dBm V, CDMA

​Source: https://apps.fcc.gov...html?id=1664039 and https://apps.fcc.gov...html?id=1278132

can i get a comparison to the evo 3d, the radio in that thing is horrible

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

Can someone define max ERP? I'm not technically savvy. I wonder if the tech specs of the GNex coming to Sprint are better.

Share this comment


Link to comment

So the final consensus is that the EVO LTE does not support SVDO?

Share this comment


Link to comment

So the final consensus is that the EVO LTE does not support SVDO?

 

Deval:

 

Though the geek talk is a little difficult to sort through, the EVO LTE does support SVDO and SVLTE by all indications from the FCC docs.

 

Robert

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

So the final consensus is that the EVO LTE does not support SVDO?

 

I am puzzled. How did you determine that the consensus was negative? The article states that the EVO 4G LTE supports SVDO. And the table four posts above yours lists all of the simultaneous transmission possibilities.

 

AJ

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment

If I could afford this phone off contract, I would buy it for the SVDO alone. Then I can start bragging that I have voice and data too like those lousy at&t losers. Haha :P

Share this comment


Link to comment

One peculiarity with this phone as compared with all other Sprint ESMR handsets I've noticed. Every other handset has been approved from 817.9 - 823.1 MHz (channels 476 - 684). The HTC EVO LTE was approved only up to 822.75 MHz (channel 670). It would not be capable of using EVDO/1xA (CDMA) channel 676 should Sprint ever deploy a carrier here, although every other ESMR-enabled handset would.

Share this comment


Link to comment

I am puzzled. How did you determine that the consensus was negative? The article states that the EVO 4G LTE supports SVDO. And the table four posts above yours lists all of the simultaneous transmission possibilities.AJ

 

I think some of the confusion is that in previous threads before these tests came out, and based on the parts involved (specifically the MSM8960), everyone was saying that only the Viper, which like some VZW phones has 2 distinct chips with CDMA radios on each, was likely to have simultaneous voice + data on 2/3G (in addition to simultaneous voice + LTE data) and Sprint was unlikely to put much effort into getting future phones to have that feature.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Please help me out here - where is the GPS antenna? :confused:

 

Some FCC OET filings disclose the location of the GPS antenna, but others do not. They are not required to do so, as the GPS antenna is purely Rx, no Tx.

 

You can see from our Samsung Galaxy S3 FCC rundown that its filing does include a block diagram with the location of the GPS antenna. But the EVO LTE's filing does not. I would suspect, though, that the GPS antenna is located under the plastic casing (which likely functions as an RF window) on the upper third of the back of the handset.

 

AJ

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

I was looking around in the reports, but I got lost. What are typical cell phone WiFi transmitted power and antenna gains?

 

NM... Found it....

 

https://apps.fcc.gov/eas/GetApplicationAttachment.html?id=1653623

 

 

 

MODULATION TYPE

CCK, DQPSK, DBPSK for DSSS

64QAM, 16QAM, QPSK, BPSK for OFDM

 

MODULATION TECHNOLOGY DSSS, OFDM

 

TRANSFER RATE

802.11b:11.0/ 5.5/ 2.0/ 1.0Mbps

802.11g: 54.0/ 48.0/ 36.0/ 24.0/ 18.0/ 12.0/ 9.0/ 6.0Mbps

802.11a: 54.0/ 48.0/ 36.0/ 24.0/ 18.0/ 12.0/ 9.0/ 6.0Mbps

802.11n: up to 150.0Mbps

 

OPERATING FREQUENCY 2.4GHz: 2412 ~ 2462MHz

5.0GHz: 5745 ~ 5825MHz

 

NUMBER OF CHANNEL

2.4GHz:

11 for 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n (20MHz)

5.0GHz:

5 for 802.11a, 802.11n (20MHz)

2 for 802.11n (40MHz)

 

OUTPUT POWER 123.59mW for 2412 ~ 2462MHz

76.91mW for 5745 ~ 5825MHz

 

ANTENNA TYPE 2.4GHz: PIFA antenna with -2.94dBi gain

5.0GHz: PIFA antenna with -2.35dBi gain

Share this comment


Link to comment

Good, I am glad that you found the info you were seeking. Antenna gain is not always included because it does not have to be disclosed. The FCC is primarily concerned that the device meets certain RF emission standards. If those standards can be met with a high gain or low gain antenna, then the FCC could not care less. But from my experience, when antenna gain is listed, it is usually in the -5 dBi to 2 dBi range.

 

As for Wi-Fi output power, it is interesting that the HTC One seems to be using the same antenna structure as the EVO LTE. But the HTC One offers considerably higher ERP. See the HTC One figures below:

 

249.459mW for 2412 ~ 2462MHz

280.543mW for 5745 ~ 5805MHz

2.4GHz: PIFA antenna with -2.94dBi gain

5.0GHz: PIFA antenna with -2.35dBi gain

 

AJ

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×