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iOS 5.1 confirms next generation iPhone supporting LTE

JustAGeekHere

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Danny Bullard

Sprint 4G Rollout Update

Saturday, March 24, 2012 - 10:44 AM MDT

 

 

According to iDownloadBlog, the iPhone 5, or whatever Apple decides to call it, will reportedly pack 4G LTE according to iOS 5.1 code strings. Until now, all the other LTE iPhone rumors have just been speculation and wishful thinking. The code strings says:

 

Enabling 4G will end your phone call. Are you sure you want to enable 4G?

 

We can gather that this line in iOS5.1 must be created for use in the new iPhone, because the new iPad cannot make phone calls. Although it seems odd that the Apple iPhone would not support simultaneous voice and LTE. The new LTE Android devices from Sprint have been confirmed to handle SVLTE. Perhaps it just cannot be enabled while a call is in process? Or maybe it is not compatible with one or more carriers in the world?

 

So, if the new iPhone packs LTE connectivity with a faster processor, bigger display and the rumored aluminum casing, will you buy one on Sprint's LTE network? Assuming Sprint gets a LTE iPhone, of course. Sound off in the comments.

iPhone-4S-Verizon-LTE.jpg

 

Photo Courtesy of BGR.com

 

Source:

iDownloadBlog



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VZW LTE handsets are able to support SVLTE (and some SV-DO, too) because they utilize two separate modems: one for CDMA1X/EV-DO and one for LTE. The two modems are required for simultaneous connectivity (e.g. CDMA1X + LTE or CDMA1X + EV-DO).

 

Upcoming Sprint LTE handsets will almost certainly do likewise. For example, consider the HTC Jet. We know that it utilizes the Qualcomm MSM8960 CPU + modem chipset. That is the modem that will likely be used for LTE, but the Jet will also have to incorporate a second modem for CDMA1X/EV-DO connectivity.

 

Apple may not be willing to incorporate that redundancy because of iPhone size and power consumption concerns.

 

AJ

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VZW LTE handsets are able to support SVLTE (and some SV-DO, too) because they utilize two separate modems: one for CDMA1X/EV-DO and one for LTE. The two modems are required for simultaneous connectivity (e.g. CDMA1X + LTE or CDMA1X + EV-DO).Upcoming Sprint LTE handsets will almost certainly do likewise. For example, consider the HTC Jet. We know that it utilizes the Qualcomm MSM8960 CPU + modem chipset. That is the modem that will likely be used for LTE, but the Jet will also have to incorporate a second modem for CDMA1X/EV-DO connectivity.Apple may not be willing to incorporate that redundancy because of iPhone size and power consumption concerns.AJ

 

In Sprint LTE FIT reports, they specifically mention that the GNex, Viper and HTC "Jet" all support SVLTE, and they were tested and passed. It will be a significant marketing disadvantage for Apple and their carriers if they do not support SVLTE. That's my two cents, for what it's worth!

 

Robert

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In Sprint LTE FIT reports, they specifically mention that the GNex, Viper and HTC "Jet" all support SVLTE, and they were tested and passed. It will be a significant marketing disadvantage for Apple and their carriers if they do not support SVLTE. That's my two cents, for what it's worth!Robert

 

I would have to agree. AT&T has marketed simultaneous voice and data for some time now, and for a high end handset like the iPhone to not support that now that the CDMA carriers finally have SVLTE would be a huge step backwards for the iPhone. Apple would be wise to find a way to fit it in there.

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I'm starting to wonder if that should have been the headline and slant of the story..."Does the upcoming iPhone LTE not support Simultaneous Voice/LTE Data?"

 

Robert

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Guys, I will let you in on a dirty little secret from the GSM/W-CDMA side of things. As far as I know, no GSM/W-CDMA/LTE device supports the equivalent of SVLTE. Now, let that sink in. Discuss among yourselves, and I will be back later to follow up with some important ramifications.

 

AJ

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Guys, I will let you in on a dirty little secret from the GSM/W-CDMA side of things. As far as I know, no GSM/W-CDMA/LTE device supports the equivalent of SVLTE. Now, let that sink in. Discuss among yourselves, and I will be back later to follow up with some important ramifications.AJ

 

Hmmm...I think I've always just assumed that GSM could easily support SVLTE for two reasons. 1. LTE is considered the upgrade path for GSM. 2. AT&T pushes simultaneous voice/data so hard as a marketing differentiator, that I assumed it was a foregone conclusion.

 

Perhaps this is a future AJ article for S4GRU, and tying in the iPhone SVLTE issue?

 

Robert

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Well, I will continue to tease this a bit. AT&T LTE handsets, as with all AT&T 3G/4G handsets, do support simultaneous voice/data. But, as stated previously, I do not know of any GSM ecosystem LTE devices that support the equivalent of SVLTE. Do you note the subtle distinction? Again, discuss, and I will return to clarify and/or string this along a bit more. ;)

 

AJ

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Well, if you are implying that LTE in itself will not support LTE and voice, like in the instance of VoLTE, then I can see what you are referring to. It would take several MIMO antennas to pull that off.

 

However, I can see a SVLTE with GSM happening in the same way it does with CDMA/LTE.

 

Robert

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No, this has no real connection to VoLTE, other than that VoLTE does allow for simultaneous voice/data, though not through MIMO. MIMO is just a way of increasing throughput, a special type of spatial reuse, and simultaneous VoLTE/data does not require MIMO nor separate antennas. In LTE, everything is packetized, and the packets get sorted out via addressing and potentially QoS.

 

As for a GSM ecosystem version of SVLTE using two separate modems (a la CDMA1X SVLTE), it might be possible. But I am not certain that there is a GSM ecosystem set standard for dual modems, nor do I know of any such devices.

 

Also, keep in mind that several VZW handsets now support SV-DO, but the iPhone 4S is not one of them.

 

And the mystery lingers... ;)

 

AJ

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@ AJ

 

This discussion may be out of my league but are you saying that no at&t lte phone can do lte and voice at the same time?

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Yes, muffinman. I will stand to be corrected, but I know of no LTE handset, not AT&T nor otherwise, that is capable of LTE simultaneous voice/data (outside of VoLTE handsets, of course). That said, AT&T LTE handsets are still capable of simultaneous voice/data. It is a bit of a paradox, and I made this same distinction above, but no one seems to have seized on it yet. So, I am still waiting for an explanation... ;)

 

AJ

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And if I am being too coy, feel free to call me out it. Otherwise, if you are enjoying the game, we will let it play on...

 

AJ

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Okay now im lost....The MSM8960 clearly supports SVLTE & 1X Advanced...

Why will devices using this chipset need another modem chip to support it?

 

page5-6 i think

www.qualcomm.com/documents/files/snapdragon-s4-processors-system-on-chip-solutions-for-a-new-mobile-age-white-paper.pdf

 

as far as the iPhoneLTE version I'm going to guess it will be the exact same chipset used in the iPad A5X with the MDM9600 being added in there for the LTE connectivity...Less they make a jump to the MDM9615...

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Sgt., unless circumstances have changed with the release of the Qualcomm S4 SoCs, SVLTE and SV-DO always require two radio pathways, hence dual modems. If the MSM8960 can actually support SVLTE and SV-DO without a second modem, then that will be a very nice development toward greater simplicity and lower power consumption.

 

AJ

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Sgt., unless circumstances have changed with the release of the Qualcomm S4 SoCs, SVLTE and SV-DO always require two radio pathways, hence dual modems. If the MSM8960 can actually support SVLTE and SV-DO without a second modem, then that will be a very nice development toward greater simplicity and lower power consumption.AJ

 

Well you have me there the more I think about it the more I want to question my own thought...

It seems you could infer that the stating the chip "supports" the feature doesn't mean it can do it and all the others at the same time on its own...

 

If that is the case I would expect the MSM8960 devices to also have the MDM9615 chip along side so they can handle the features...

 

Now you got me questioning too much. lol

 

guess we wont know till the JET or whatever is released. lol

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Sgt., for a relatively recent parallel (that admittedly may or may not apply until we get the final world on the S4 MSM8960), VZW's HTC Rezound uses the S3 MSM8660 for its CPU + modem chipset and the MDM9600 for its second modem.

 

In the case of the Rezound, the MDM9600 handles LTE duties, since the MSM8660 lacks LTE capability. If Sprint's HTC Jet requires a second modem, however, the roles could be reversed, with the MSM8960 taking the LTE lead.

 

AJ

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I love our comment threads on our articles. Contrast these with the comments on articles on most other sites!

 

Robert

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Oh, by the way, the MSM8960 does natively support TD-LTE, not that the HTC Jet will likely take advantage of that capability, however.

 

snapdragon-s4-details.jpg

 

AJ

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Given that we know that MSM8960 supports TD-LTE, and now that we know Sprint can add the additional antennas based on USCC's new Samsung LTE device, the only thing that seems to be stopping Sprint from having the HTC Jet support TD-LTE 2500 is sheer desire.

 

Robert

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Given that we know that MSM8960 supports TD-LTE, and now that we know Sprint can add the additional antennas based on USCC's new Samsung LTE device, the only thing that seems to be stopping Sprint from having the HTC Jet support TD-LTE 2500 is sheer desire.Robert

 

I missed where they got extra antennae's in their device...

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Sgt., an upcoming USCC Samsung handset supports CDMA1X/EV-DO 850/1900 + LTE 700/850/1900/2100+1700 (i.e. AWS).

 

296p5b5.png

 

AJ

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LTE Bands 2, 4, 5, 12....

Thats a pretty wide variety of LTE bands there....would make it seem that getting 800MHz and 2.5GHz LTE support is trivial now...

 

Take it thats the Aviator then there in the pic too...

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Sgt., an upcoming USCC Samsung handset supports CDMA1X/EV-DO 850/1900 + LTE 700/850/1900/2100+1700 (i.e. AWS).296p5b5.pngAJ

Where's the 2nd Rx antenna for EVDO diversity on 850 & 1900? Maybe it shares the LTE 2nd Rx antenna for that? The antenna spacing (and space allowed for such) will be a significant issue for compact handsets for some time to come.

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I have always been a loyal Android fan, and usually think that it offers far more than the Apple products... but now with a larger screen, siri and LTE, I would be a fool not to consider it.

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I have always been a loyal Android fan, and usually think that it offers far more than the Apple products... but now with a larger screen, siri and LTE, I would be a fool not to consider it.

As long as you like the OS that is just one giant app drawer....

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